Latest News

Common Good Initiative Unites Campus and Global Community

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Catholicism

Graduate students across the University will now be able to participate in an experiential learning course previously offered only to master’s in divinity students in Notre Dame’s Department of Theology. The Common Good Initiative program (CGI), formerly called the Pastoral Leadership Practicum, combines direct involvement in disenfranchised and impoverished communities with coursework in Catholic social teaching and multidimensional poverty analysis.

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Philosopher Anjan Chakravartty Joins University of Notre Dame

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Anjan Chakravartty, a distinguished philosopher of science and metaphysics, is joining the University of Notre Dame as a professor in the Department of Philosophy and the John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values. “This is a signal hire for the Notre Dame philosophy department, the History and Philosophy of Science graduate program, and the Reilly center,” says Don Howard, director of the center and a a professor of philosophy. “Chakravartty is a rapidly rising star who brings not only a distinguished record of scholarship but also a record of academic leadership.”

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History Alumna Inspires New Generation of College Students

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News and Alumni

Notre Dame Department of History alumna Nicole Farmer Hurd ’92 was recently featured on NBC Nightly News With Brian Williams for her efforts to help disadvantaged high school students enter the world of higher education. Hurd is the founder and executive director of the National College Advising Corps (NCAC), a program that strives to increase the number and graduation rate of low-income, underrepresented, and first-generation college students. NCAC is housed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where Hurd also serves as a clinical assistant professor in the School of Education.

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Arts and Letters Students Explore the World of Business

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Alumni, and Centers and Institutes

They won’t hear a drill sergeant shouting orders. They won’t crawl in the mud. And they won’t be scaling tall walls. At this boot camp, a select group of Notre Dame students in the College of Arts and Letters will instead learn to navigate the business world, analyze corporate data, and propose solutions to key management problems. Held in Chicago during spring break each year, the four-day Arts and Letters Business Boot Camp allows liberal arts students to meet and network with employers and successful Chicago-area alumni.

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David Campbell Receives Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

David Campbell, John Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C., Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, and Robert Putnam of Harvard University are the 2011 recipients of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for their book American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us. The American Political Science Association awards the prize annually to the best book from the past year on government, politics, or international affairs.

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FTT Internships Offer Inside Look at Industry Careers

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Arts

Meet the Press. Steppenwolf Theatre Company. NBCUniversal. MTV. National Geographic. The Jimmy Kimmel Show. CNN. Entertainment One. NFL Films. Television stations from coast to coast. These are just some of the places where students in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) intern as undergraduates, developing industry experience, making invaluable contacts, and getting exposure to a wide variety of career opportunities.

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Ph.D. Student Analyzes Religion’s Influence on War and Peace

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Catholicism

No one would dispute that religious convictions can lead to conflict—even violence and war. Yet how is it that so often adversaries use their faith to justify opposing stances in the same dispute? That’s the question that intrigues Christopher Morrissey, a doctoral candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology.

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Doctoral Student Researches Violence in Guatemala

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

For the first time since their discovery in 2005, archival records chronicling police violence during the Guatemalan Civil War have been made available to academic researchers. And Ph.D. candidate Christopher Sullivan has become one of the first scholars to investigate the collection of more than 80 million documents at the National Police Archives in Guatemala City.

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Graduate Student Examines History of Native American Policies

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News and Research

Although talk of extinction is often focused on plant and animal life, graduate student Myles Beaupre is researching what it means when extinction applies to an entire race of people. Beaupre, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History, is studying government policies on Native Americans throughout the development of the United States—from the British Empire-controlled colonies to the mid- to late-1800s of the newly formed country.

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Political Scientist David Campbell Receives Book Award

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us has been named the Best Nonfiction Book by the Religion Communicators Council (RCC). David Campbell, John Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C., Associate Professor of Political Science at Notre Dame, and his co-author, Robert Putnam of Harvard University share this 2011 Wilbur Award for “excellence in the communication of religious issues, values, and themes in the secular media.”

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Undergrad Brings Euripides Into Modern Era

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News

Notre Dame undergraduate Josef Kuhn has set out to show how the human struggles depicted in ancient Greek literature are just as pressing today as they were thousands of years ago. After studying Euripides’ well-known tragedy The Bacchae, the senior Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) major decided to write a novel based on the classic but set in modern times.

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Candida Moss Receives International Award for Theological Promise

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Candida Moss, assistant professor in the Department of Theology, is one of only 12 scholars in the world to receive the 2011 John Templeton Award for Theological Promise. Awarded in collaboration with the Research Center of International and Interdisciplinary Theology at the University of Heidelberg in Germany, the John Templeton Foundation’s prize honors up-and-coming academics based on their doctoral dissertation or first post-doctoral book on the topic of God and spirituality.

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Notre Dame Senior Makes Documentary on Fan Influence and Pop Culture

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News and Arts

Television plays a role in the daily lives of most Americans—but its impacts can be even greater among the fan groups that spring up around popular shows. To explore the interplay between one television director’s work and the fan culture it inspires, Notre Dame senior Stephanie DePrez recently traveled to Southern California to research and film a short documentary.

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Love of Appalachian Literature Inspires Student Research

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Research

Pride in his cultural heritage and a love of literature prompted Matthew Coyne—a Notre Dame senior majoring in English—to delve into the origins of the Appalachian literary journal Cold Mountain Review. “My professors encouraged me to study what I love,” says Coyne, who was raised in Parkersburg, W.Va., a small town located in the heart of Appalachia. “So I did—and I haven’t looked back since.”

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