Latest News

To tackle climate change, Environmental Humanities Initiative embraces ecology, ethics, and the arts

Author: Jon Hendricks

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, and Catholicism

Notre Dame’s Catholic character and commitment to the humanities endow the University with unique perspective, and role, in leading an international conversation about addressing the global crisis of climate change, said Roy Scranton, an associate professor of English who directs the Initiative.

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A match made in music: Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition at Notre Dame celebrates 50 years

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: General News and Arts

“As an institution committed to both education and the arts, Notre Dame is proud to host the Fischoff Competition and partner with organizers to promote music education around the globe,” said Tim Sexton, associate vice president for public affairs at Notre Dame. “Fischoff introduces hundreds of young musicians to Notre Dame each year, providing innumerable benefits — social, cultural, economic — to campus and the surrounding community. We congratulate them on 50 years and look forward to the next 50.”

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Ph.D. candidate from the UK takes road less traveled to ND, launches Medieval Institute podcast

Author: Eric Heath

Categories: Graduate Students and Centers and Institutes

When Will Beattie reflected on conversations he was having with his fellow cohort members about teamwork and collaboration, one day inspiration struck. He would launch a podcast about the work of his colleagues — scholars doing the meticulous, and sometimes invisible, work of medieval studies. His plan was to invite medievalists onto the show to tell listeners what it was like to track down a long-forgotten manuscript or to gain access to the world’s most restrictive libraries.

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How senior thesis research led an American studies and FTT major to a career working alongside her professional inspiration, Katie Couric

Author: Hailey Oppenlander

Categories: Research, General News, and Alumni

Adriana Fazio ’19 went from watching her idol on TV every day to working alongside her. A fan of The Today Show since childhood, it was no surprise that the American studies and film, television, and theatre major chose to explore the career of Katie Couric for her senior thesis. By studying Couric’s career, Fazio set her own in motion — the opportunity to interview the famed journalist ended up leading to a job with Katie Couric Media, where she’s worked across a variety of media projects.

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Classes for the Curious: Cinema of Portugal and Lusophone Africa

Author: Liam Price

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, General News, and Faculty News

For senior film, television, and theatre major Kiera Russo, taking Cinema of Portugal and Lusophone Africa was a highlight of her sophomore spring semester. Despite not knowing Portuguese, she relished being able to engage in deep discussions with classmates about cinematic productions from Portugal, Angola, Mozambique and Cape Verde. In this Q&A, she discusses what the class' most thought-provoking moments, the strong relationship she developed with the professor, and how it changed her understanding of film.

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In memoriam: Notre Dame Trustee and A&L alumnus Robert M. Conway

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News

Robert M. Conway, a member of the University of Notre Dame’s Board of Trustees for more than three decades, died Sunday (Jan. 15) in New York City. He was 78. “Bob was an accomplished business leader, a generous benefactor, a Trustee and loyal alumnus of Notre Dame and, above all, a true gentleman,” University President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., said. “He was also to many of us a dear friend, whom we will miss deeply.”

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First-generation college student Karyme Grosso '23, a design major, embraces opportunities to grow academically and personally

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Undergraduate News

“As I create art and share it with those around me, I am provided with a great support system that provides both feedback and connections with people who may be in the hunt for creative services that I can offer,” said Grosso, who is an resident advisor, dances with Ballet Folklorico Azul Y Oro, and has served as a minister at the Latino First Year Retreat.

 

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Anthropology alumna Fauvé Liggans-Hubbard named 2023 Rangel Fellow

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

“Living abroad for the past five years, I was often the first Black and/or American my foreign students met, so I believe it is important for U.S. diplomats abroad to reflect the diverse American population,” said Fauvé Liggans-Hubbard. “These experiences, along with many others, solidified my passion for cultural exchange, and I couldn’t be more proud to be a part of a program that aims to increase diversity in the U.S. Foreign Service.”

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Notre Dame economist Jing Cynthia Wu wins Richard Stone Prize in Applied Econometrics 

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Notre Dame economist Jing Cynthia Wu’s paper that details a new model to examine economic effects of unconventional monetary policy in the Euro area has won the Richard Stone Prize in Applied Econometrics from the Journal of Applied Econometrics. The journal awards the prize every two years for the best paper with substantive econometric applications. Econometrics uses economic theory, mathematics, and statistical inference to quantify economic phenomena.

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de Nicola Center hosts expert roundtable discussion on caring for women and children in a post–Roe world

Author: Kenneth Hallenius

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

The de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture at the University of Notre Dame will mark the 50th anniversary of Roe v. Wade in Washington, D.C., on Thursday with an expert roundtable discussion on how best to care for and protect mothers, babies, and families in the wake of the Dobbs v. Jackson Supreme Court decision. “Building a Civilization of Love” will bring together experts in law, medicine, social science, public health, and social service to discuss the most important opportunities for and challenges to protecting the intrinsic equal dignity of every member of the human family following the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Dobbs

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Q&A: History Ph.D. student Grace Song Swihart examines visual culture to better understand U.S.-Korea relations

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, and General News

For Grace Song Swihart, learning helps her understand life’s complexities. She’s used photographs, flags, and other visual sources in her research, teaching, and an internship at Notre Dame’s Snite Museum of Art to show how cultural representations have impacted foreign relations between the U.S. and Korea, as well as Americans’ understanding of Koreans. Comprehending the cultural history of the U.S-Korea relationship is necessary to contextualize Korean culture and people, said Swihart, who grew up in Koreatown in Los Angeles then earned a B.A. in history and an M.A. in historical studies at The New School. In this interview, she discusses her research and how it has helped her better understand her own family and begin the process of healing after recent anti-Asian violence in America.

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Anthropologist wins prestigious NEH fellowship to explore toll of climate change in Sierra Leone

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Notre Dame anthropologist Catherine “Cat” Bolten has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to support the writing of her book that examines links between food insecurity, human population growth and wildlife depletion, land politics and degradation, and climate change in Sierra Leone. The associate professor of anthropology and peace studies is one of 70 scholars — from among more than 1,030 applicants nationwide — to be awarded the competitive fellowships. 

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How majoring in political science and Arabic prepared Erin Hayes ’18 for a job in Egypt and grad school in England

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

"I feel like Notre Dame helped me with seizing opportunities to go abroad," said Hayes, who now is attending Officer Candidate School and plans to join the U.S. Navy. "I had never left the country, other than to go to Canada. And then [at Notre Dame], I saw there were study abroad experiences and grants to go abroad. That really gave me the travel bug."

 

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Modern American History journal to be based at Notre Dame and co-edited by Dochuk, expanding opportunities for graduate students

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, General News, and Faculty News

Notre Dame historian Darren Dochuk has started his five-year term as co-executive editor of Modern American History, the go-to journal for researchers exploring any facet of 20th-century United States history. He is prioritizing the journal’s commitment to graduate students and new Ph.Ds, he said, as their scholarship is often the most innovative and path-breaking and their need to be published is critical. Ph.D. students at Notre Dame will have opportunities to work as editorial assistants, as the University is serving as MAH’s host institution during Dochuk’s five-year term.

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Morrell, Berends again achieve Edu-Scholar ranking for doing most to shape educational practice, policy

Author: Theo Helm

Categories: Research, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

“Our selection shows the national impact that Notre Dame has on the K-12 education landscape in the United States,” Mark Berends said. “As we look to the new year, we and the talented faculty we represent at Notre Dame seek to continue to improve educational opportunities for all children.”

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Q&A: Three Notre Dame students share why they're majoring in psychology

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Q and A, and Centers and Institutes

Sophia Alvarez's favorite class is CogSci Goes to School, which examines how cognitive science informs educational practices; it includes tutoring in area schools. Ryan Van Kirk enjoyed Childhood Maltreatment Practicum, which involves mentoring a child in the foster care system. For Chris Walsh, Drunk on Film fostered meaningful discussions about the normalization of binge drinking in our culture.

 

 

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Notre Dame faculty experts reflect on life, legacy of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes and Catholicism

“Joseph Ratzinger’s death in some ways marks the end of the post-Vatican II era,” said John McGreevy, the Charles and Jill Fischer Provost. “He was the last living major figure from the council, which is now sliding from living memory into history. Working with his friend and patron, Pope John Paul II — his predecessor — before his own election in 2005, he helped set the agenda within the Church and sometimes within the wider world for a full 35 years.”

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John Wetzel '15, an industrial design and mechanical engineering major, has created lofts, T-shirts, and companies

Author: Melanie Lux

Categories: Alumni

Wetzel was attracted to Notre Dame's Reilly Dual Degree program because he could pursue his interests in industrial design and mechanical engineering. As a student, he started a pop-up business and built lofts for peers in residence halls. And in 2012, he created the winning design for The Shirt that students and fans wear to football games. Today, he's a senior product manager at ChartHop.

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Camping in Wyoming: Merit scholars connect with nature, and each other, before beginning classes at Notre Dame

Author: Oliver Ortega

Categories: Undergraduate News and Centers and Institutes

In Bridger-Teton National Forest last summer, nine incoming Notre Dame merit scholars camped for four nights as part of an excursion sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies. The newest group of Latino Studies merit scholars, also known as LSSP 6, hiked 3-6 miles a day. "Overall, it was the bonding experiences between my fellow scholars that I most appreciated," said Johanna Jimenez, a pre-health major from Minneapolis.

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Q&A: How Notre Dame’s Summer in Berlin Program re-energized an economics major’s academic pursuits

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Internationalism and General News

Junior Nick Huls gained knowledge, confidence, and perspective taking part in the six-week Summer in Berlin Program offered by the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures, which resumed operation in 2022 after being halted for two years due to COVID-19. In addition to taking two courses, the economics major enjoyed traveling; attending plays, concerts, and art exhibits; and sampling food from across the region. “No matter how much you think you know or how many places you go, there are always more perspectives to be appreciated,” he said.

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