Latest News

NIH awards $4 million grant to psychologists researching suicide prevention

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Catholicism

Notre Dame psychologists Theodore Beauchaine and Kristin Valentino have received the Transformative Research Award from the National Institutes of Health to research two promising new interventions to reduce the risk of suicide among vulnerable youth. Part of the NIH High-Risk, High-Reward Research program, the award supports individuals or teams proposing transformative projects that are inherently untested but have the potential to create major scientific breakthroughs by challenging existing paradigms.

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Congresswoman Liz Cheney to speak at Notre Dame on the future of democracy, hosted by Center for Citizenship and Constitutional Government

Author: Soren Grefenstette

Categories: General News

Congresswoman Liz Cheney will visit the University of Notre Dame on Oct. 14 (Friday) to deliver a lecture titled Saving Democracy by Revering the Constitution. “The center strives to bring a diverse array of speakers to Notre Dame, including our nation’s most consequential political leaders,” said Vincent Phillip Muñoz, director of the Center for Citizenship and Constitutional Government and the Tocqueville Associate Professor of Political Science. “We are honored to host a leader with a distinguished record of public service and hope that Congresswoman Cheney’s visit will encourage thoughtful conversation about the future of American republicanism and the kind of political character necessary to sustain it.”

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Psychology professor Alison Cheng runner-up for 1st Source Bank’s Commercialization Award for her AI-powered platform that provides personalized STEM education

Author: Olivia Poole

Categories: Research and Faculty News

Adapta’s main product is an adaptive diagnostic assessment platform covering high school and introductory college math curricula. It allows teachers to create customized assessments, such as quizzes, homework, and exams, in a straightforward manner, which enables competency-based grading with a diagnostic report for each student. Reports help teachers and students quickly identify their strengths and weaknesses and determine where additional clarification or practice is needed. 

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New prison education initiative unites Notre Dame efforts to offer opportunities for liberal arts education to incarcerated individuals

Author: JP Shortall

Categories: General News and Centers and Institutes

A new prison education initiative will bring five local, state and national prison education programs together in one effort to be housed at the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns. Notre Dame Programs for Education in Prisons (NDPEP) will offer opportunities for liberal arts education to people incarcerated in Indiana, create the infrastructure to support NDPEP participants as they re-enter their home communities, and provide faculty and student opportunities for education and research on issues related to incarceration.

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Restoring God’s Creation: How a theology professor integrates environment and economics in Uganda

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Catholicism

As a child, Emmanuel Katongole went into the forest near his home in Uganda to draw water from the spring and collect firewood for cooking. Now a diocesan priest who has taught theology and peace studies for a decade at Notre Dame, he has worried upon every return home about the intense deforestation destroying his native land. In a country where more than half the population is under age 20, he knew that young people moving to the cities lacked opportunities and needed firewood, leading to rampant tree cutting.

But it wasn’t until reading Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato si’ that Katongole envisioned a solution that uses education to address both problems — protecting the environment and providing economic opportunities. He joined with several colleagues and the local Catholic Church to found Bethany Land Institute (BLI) in a rural area 25 miles north of the capital city of Kampala.

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Notre Dame philosopher and psychologist team up to study whether intellectual humility is a virtue — and if it’s helpful or harmful to the marginalized and oppressed

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Intellectual humility — being free to think and listen without being concerned with the need to “be right” — could be an antidote for some pressing personal and societal problems. An interdisciplinary group of philosophers and psychologists, led by Laura Callahan and supported by a John Templeton Foundation grant, are hoping to identify how the characteristic can be used by individuals to improve their lives and how it can be more inclusive.

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In new book on global Catholicism, Provost John McGreevy explores modern history, current challenges of the Church

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Catholicism

In his newest book, historian and Notre Dame Provost John McGreevy examines the Church’s complex role in modern history as it both shaped and followed the politics of nation-states. Through a series of compelling vignettes and detailed analyses, McGreevy traces the events and trends that gave rise to the modern-day Catholic Church, one marked by an unwavering concern for social justice, unprecedented vibrancy in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia and increasing global connections — and one that has significantly expanded the organizational and symbolic reach of the papacy.

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Notre Dame launches BIG Lab to address global poverty and economic inequality

Author: Katie Jamieson

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Even the most effective poverty alleviation programs in low-income countries can leave some people behind. Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies have a big idea on how to bridge that gap. The new Building Inclusive Growth (BIG) Lab, led by Notre Dame economists Taryn Dinkelman, Lakshmi Iyer, and Joseph Kaboski, will bring some of the world’s best researchers together to develop innovative, long-lasting solutions to help vulnerable populations in developing countries.

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Historian’s book on influential 20th-century French priests wins four awards

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Catholicism

Notre Dame historian Sarah Shortall’s debut book, Soldiers of God in a Secular World: Catholic Theology and Twentieth-Century French Politics, which chronicles an influential French theological movement that reimagined the Church’s role in the public sphere, has now earned four awards in the 10 months since it was published. The assistant professor of history has received the Giuseppe Alberigo Junior Scholar Award from the European Academy of Religion, the Best Book Award from the College Theology Society, the Laurence Wylie Prize in French Cultural Studies from New York University, and the first place Book Award for History from the Catholic Media Association.

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Political scientist Karrie Koesel to testify before Congressional-Executive Commission on China

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Faculty News

The associate professor will discuss the People’s Republic of China’s strategies for asserting party control over religion, especially through sinicization, which calls on religious believers to integrate party loyalty into all aspects of religious life. She'll offer recommendations for how Congress and the Biden administration can effectively advocate for freedom of religion in China.

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Two-day gathering to celebrate Afro-Latinx poetry with acclaimed poets and scholars through talks, conversations, and performances

Author: Institute for Latino Studies

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Arts

A renowned group of 12 poets and scholars from across the country will convene at the University of Notre Dame from Sept. 27–28 for a dynamic cultural event featuring talks, conversations, and performances that will showcase the vitality and diversity of contemporary poetry.

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‘The best decision I ever made’: How being among the first classes of women at Notre Dame prepared Ann L. Combs ’78 to thrive in corporate boardrooms and the nation’s capital 

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: General News and Alumni

As an undergraduate at Notre Dame in the 1970s, Ann Combs was often the only woman in her classes. But that didn't faze her — in fact, it prepared her for a successful 40-year career in public policy affecting retirement and health care benefits. Combs served in the Department of Labor under three presidents, culminating in being appointed assistant secretary for employee benefits security by President George W Bush. She also worked in the private sector, helping trade associations and private companies navigate Washington, D.C. Throughout it all, the skills she developed and knowledge she gleaned from her Notre Dame liberal arts education served her well in her career. 

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Political science professor’s book on Islamic law wins two International Studies Association awards 

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Internationalism, and General News

Emilia Justyna Powell, a Notre Dame professor of political science and concurrent professor at The Law School, has won two International Studies Association (ISA) awards for her 2020 book, Islamic Law and International Law: Peaceful Resolution of Disputes. Lauded for its originality, significance, and rigor in international law and religion and international relations, the book covers differences and similarities between the Islamic legal tradition and international law.

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Political scientist Jeff Harden co-authors book detailing how government transparency benefits special interest groups, not citizenry

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research and Faculty News

“There are more groups that register to lobby in states with open meetings and they donate more to incumbent politicians," said the Andrew J. McKenna Family Associate Professor of Political Science. "This leads to an ironic conclusion: The laws don’t make citizen representation better, they make it better for interest groups, which aren’t representative of the general public. Because citizens are not fulfilling their role in that relationship, lobbyists are coming in.”

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Theology professor Ulrich Lehner elected to prestigious Academy of Europe 

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, General News, and Catholicism

Ulrich L. Lehner, a leading expert on early modern Catholicism and the William K. Warren Foundation Professor in the Department of Theology, has been elected a member of Academia Europaea, also called the Academy of Europe. He’s in excellent company — 75 Nobel Prize recipients are among its members, including the three 2021 laureates in physics. The academy promotes research, advises governments and international organizations, and furthers interdisciplinary and international research.

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Video: The classics major at Notre Dame

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News and General News

What is the classics major like at Notre Dame? “If you like history or poetry or art history or literature, you can find your own path in classics. I wouldn't want to have been anywhere else,” said student Nicholas Mungan. Classics majors pursue their passions while developing skills such as critical thinking, analysis, writing, and problem solving, then go on to top graduate and professional schools and work in a variety of professions and industries.

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With Getty Scholar Grant, art history professor will bring image of Central America into sharper focus

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Arts

For generations, North Americans have seen media images of poverty, disease, civil war, and crime in Central America, including photographs and videos of Central Americans fleeing violence and of children, some just 2 or 3 years old, kept in cages at immigration detention camps. Even when well-intentioned, the images can feed into negative stereotypes, said Tatiana Reinoza, an assistant professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Design. Reinoza has won a competitive Getty Scholar Grant that will support her effort to more fully represent the seven-country region, its people, and their stories with her book project, tentatively titled “Retorno: Art and Kinship in the making of a Central American Diaspora.”

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Sociologist wins European book award for research on how pockets of government in developing countries thrive 

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, and Faculty News

The European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS) has presented Notre Dame sociologist Erin Metz McDonnell with its 2022 Book Award for her original contribution to the knowledge about organizations, organizing, and the organized. In her award-winning book, Patchwork Leviathan: Pockets of Bureaucratic Effectiveness in Developing States, McDonnell argues that while corruption and ineffectiveness may be expected of public servants in developing countries, “some spectacularly effective state organizations thrive amid institutional weakness and succeed against impressive odds.” 

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A&L faculty win NEH grants for book about history of red hair and philosophy of revelation project

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News and Centers and Institutes

White’s book juxtaposes cultural history with genomic discoveries to analyze how redheads — who carry the genetic variant MC1R — have been alternately abused, glorified and discriminated against through a wide range of times and locations, from ancient Egypt to the present-day United States. Betz will co-direct a project to create a critical edition of F.W.J. von Schelling’s original 1831-32 Munich lectures on the philosophy of revelation, which represent a profound attempt to wrestle with the nature and significance of religion and specifically with claims of divine revelation — or moments of divine self-disclosure.

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Video: Why learn a language?

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, and General News

Learning a second, or third, language is transformative for Notre Dame students. Developing the ability to read, speak, and comprehend Arabic, Chinese, or any of the other 15+ languages that Notre Dame offers, improves memory and problem-solving skills. It also deepens appreciation of cultures, enhances travel experiences, boosts confidence, and expands understanding of the world. 

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