Saturday Scholar Series

A different game plan for autumn weekends

Fall 2015 Schedule

Saturday Scholars 2015

Come back to campus! You are invited to experience an intimate discussion with Notre Dame’s most engaging faculty speakers on some of the most pressing and fascinating issues of our times.

Each lecture and Q&A is presented in the Snite Museum’s Annenberg Auditorium at noon (unless otherwise noted) on a “home game” Saturday. All lectures are free and open to the public.

More information about other “home game” events on campus is available on the GameDay website.

9.5.15 (vs. University of Texas)

Game at 7:30 p.m.; lecture at 4 p.m.

“The Changing American Voter in 2016 and Beyond”

Luis Fraga, Arthur Foundation Endowed Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership; Professor, Department of Political Science; Co-Director, Institute for Latino Studies

9.19.15 (vs. Georgia Institute of Technology)

“Sparkle: Contemporary Girls’ Media Culture”

Mary Celeste Kearney, Associate Professor, Department of Film, Television, and Theatre; Director, Gender Studies Program

9.26.15 (vs. University of Massachusetts)

“What’s Posterity Ever Done for Us?: Literature and the Future”

John Sitter, Mary Lee Duda Professor of Literature, Department of English

10.10.15 (vs. U.S. Naval Academy)

“Father Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C., Among the Notre Dame Presidents”

Notre Dame’s 17 presidents, from Father Edward Sorin to Father John I. Jenkins, have advanced what was initially a regional preparatory school into an internationally recognized Catholic university. This session will examine the legacy of Father Ted Hesburgh among Notre Dame’s presidents.

Panel:
Father Thomas Blantz, C.S.C., Professor Emeritus, Department of History
Dr. Nancy Haegel, Materials Science Center Director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Father Edward A. “Monk” Malloy, C.S.C., President Emeritus

Moderator:
Timothy Matovina, Professor, Department of Theology; Co-Director, Institute for Latino Studies

10.17.15 (vs. University of Southern California)

Game at 7:30 p.m.; lecture at 4 p.m.

“How Our Siblings Shape Us: Evidence from Economics”

Are big families better for children? Is there an advantage to being the oldest? This discussion will explore the many ways that the number and composition of one’s siblings affect development and long-term well-being.

Kasey Buckles, Brian and Jeannelle Brady Associate Professor of Economics

11.14.15 (vs. Wake Forest University)

“1916: Screening the Irish Rebellion”

The 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin is not only a seminal historical event in Irish history but one which had reverberations around the globe, inspiring future freedom movements in places as far flung as India and Africa. The Rising itself was globalized from the start. Without the support of the Irish diaspora in the U.S., the Rising would never have happened. This talk will examine the complexities of these events and the experience of translating them into a documentary series for television.

Bríona Nic Dhiarmada, Thomas J. and Kathleen M. O’Donnell Professor of Irish Studies, Department of Irish Language and Literature; Concurrent Professor, Department of Film, Television, and Theatre.

Arts and Letters News

  • CEC Director to Deliver Inaugural Law & Justice Lecture at University of Florence

    O. Carter Snead

    Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture director and professor of law Carter Snead will deliver the inaugural University of Florence “Law and Justice Lecture” on May 30 in Florence, Italy. His lecture, “Three Regulatory Models for Stem Cell Research,” will analyze and contrast the U.S. government’s federal funding policies under Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama as a means of exploring the complexities of American governance of science, medicine, and biotechnology in the name of ethical goods. Read More >

  • Philosophy Major Wins Naughton Fellowship to Conduct Research in Ireland

    campus_dome

    Michelle Kim, a philosophy major, has won a 2016 Naughton Fellowship, which allows students with a background in, or aptitude for, STEM fields to experience international research and educational opportunities through a funded exchange program involving the University of Notre Dame and some of Ireland’s leading research universities. With the award, Kim will complete undergraduate research at Trinity College Dublin. Read More >

  • How Studying Philosophy Guides Alumna’s Work as a Hollywood Film Director

    Anne Hamilton

    Anne Hamilton ’04 didn’t always know she wanted to be a filmmaker. She majored in philosophy in the College of Arts and Letters, but plans change, and now Hamilton is one of Hollywood’s up-and-coming directors. She recently signed with William Morris Endeavor after the successful world premiere of American Fable, a feature film she wrote, directed, and co-produced. The film made its debut at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, in March and received a string of excellent reviews. Read More >

  • Nature and Nurture Are Both Important, Anthropologist Argues in New Journal Article

    Agustín Fuentes

    Evolutionary science stresses the contributions biology makes to our behavior. Some anthropologists try to understand how societies and histories construct our identities, and others ask about how genes and the environment do the same thing. Which is the better approach? Both are needed, Notre Dame biological anthropologist Agustín Fuentes argues in a forthcoming paper in the journal Current Anthropology. Read More >