Saturday Scholar Series

A different game plan for autumn weekends

Fall 2015 Schedule

Saturday Scholars 2015

Come back to campus! You are invited to experience an intimate discussion with Notre Dame’s most engaging faculty speakers on some of the most pressing and fascinating issues of our times.

Each lecture and Q&A is presented in the Snite Museum’s Annenberg Auditorium at noon (unless otherwise noted) on a “home game” Saturday. All lectures are free and open to the public.

More information about other “home game” events on campus is available on the GameDay website.

9.5.15 (vs. University of Texas)

Game at 7:30 p.m.; lecture at 4 p.m.

“The Changing American Voter in 2016 and Beyond”

Luis Fraga, Arthur Foundation Endowed Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership; Professor, Department of Political Science; Co-Director, Institute for Latino Studies

9.19.15 (vs. Georgia Institute of Technology)

“Sparkle: Contemporary Girls’ Media Culture”

Mary Celeste Kearney, Associate Professor, Department of Film, Television, and Theatre; Director, Gender Studies Program

9.26.15 (vs. University of Massachusetts)

“What’s Posterity Ever Done for Us?: Literature and the Future”

John Sitter, Mary Lee Duda Professor of Literature, Department of English

10.10.15 (vs. U.S. Naval Academy)

“Father Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C., Among the Notre Dame Presidents”

Father Thomas Blantz, C.S.C., Professor Emeritus, Department of History; Nancy Haegel, Distinguished Professor, Department of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School; Father Edward A. “Monk” Malloy, C.S.C., President Emeritus; Timothy Matovina, Professor, Department of Theology; Co-Director, Institute for Latino Studies

10.17.15 (vs. University of Southern California)

Game at 7:30 p.m.; lecture at 4 p.m.

“How Our Siblings Shape Us: Evidence from Economics”

Kasey Buckles, Brian and Jeannelle Brady Associate Professor of Economics

11.14.15 (vs. Wake Forest University)

“1916: Screening the Irish Revolution”

Briona Nic Dhiarmada, Thomas J. and Kathleen M. O’Donnell Professor of Irish Language, Department of Irish Language and Literature

Arts and Letters News

  • Theologian Describes Pope Francis’ South American Journey as Renewal of Acquaintances

    Peter Casarella

    Pope Francis’ July 5-13 journey to South America will take him through countries and among people who already knew him well before he became the leader of all the world’s Catholics, according to Peter J. Casarella, an associate professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame who just returned from a year sabbatical in Chile at the Pontifical Catholic University of Santiago. Read More >

  • Two Romance Languages and Literatures Graduates Receive Fulbright Awards to Study Global Nutrition

    Christina Gutierrez and Claire Donovan icon

    Two recent Notre Dame graduates are tackling global health issues with support from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. French and Francophone studies major Claire Donovan will work with UNICEF in Togo to examine women’s adherence to micronutrient supplement programs. Christina Gutierrez, who majored in Romance languages and literatures and political science, will pursue a master’s degree at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy and conduct research on and pilot a food co-op concept there. Read More >

  • Theatre Alumnus Jack Blakey Appointed to Federal Judgeship

    U

    When Jack Blakey was studying theatre at Notre Dame in the 1980s, he never dreamed he would one day be hearing legal disputes on the federal bench. But his liberal arts courses were preparing him for it nonetheless. Blakey was formally installed this spring as a judge of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, following his nomination by President Barack Obama and confirmation by the U.S. Senate last year. Read More >

  • LEO Receives $435,000 NIH Grant to Study Impact of Community College Intervention Program

    leo_icon

    Notre Dame’s Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities has received a $435,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health for a two-year study of Stay the Course, a program designed to keep low-income community college students on the path to academic success. Participants are paired with a case manager who offers guidance and support on how to stay on track to graduate or transfer to a four-year college. They are also directed to affordable child care or other social services that will aid them in their pursuit of an education. Read More >