Latest News

Through history Ph.D. program, students develop innovative lines of research

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Research

Looking through new lenses, a Ph.D. candidate and two recent alumni of Notre Dame’s Ph.D. program in history have developed innovative lines of research that are adding depth to the topics of British imperialism, comparative colonialism, and human connections to animals. All three have obtained either tenure-track faculty positions or fellowships, and two finished their degrees in five years — a lofty goal set by the department and College of Arts and Letters and incentivized through the 5+1 Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

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Spanish major hones language skills to prepare for career in medicine

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

In summer 2016, Notre Dame senior Andrew Grose studied abroad in Spain — taking a headfirst dive into a language and culture he loved and had studied for years. The experience confirmed for him that whatever path he takes after graduation, Spanish will be a part of it. Grose, a Spanish and preprofessional studies major, is planning a career in medicine and knows his language skills will be a valuable asset — a fact that was underscored in a course on Latin America he took last fall.

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Notre Dame economic policy club wins national fiscal competition — on first try

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

A new Notre Dame student club focused on macro-scale economics and fiscal policy won the first national contest it entered, knocking off Harvard University, the defending champion. Notre Dame’s six-person Fiscal Challenge team — which features five Arts and Letters students — developed a plan to stabilize the United States’ debt-to-GDP ratio at current levels through 2046. Notre Dame’s team was chosen as one of three finalists, along with Harvard and Northeastern University, to present its plan live and take questions from a panel of judges.

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PLS and theology professor wins award for research on influential Catholic thinker

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

An examination of one of the 20th century’s most important Catholic theologians has garnered a significant honor for Jennifer Newsome Martin, an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies. She is one of 10 people worldwide to receive the 2017 Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise, presented by the University of Heidelberg’s Forschungszentrum für Internationale und Interdisziplinäre Theologie for outstanding doctoral or first post-doctoral works in the area of God and spirituality.

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Four Arts and Letters faculty members win ACLS fellowships

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Four faculty members in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have been awarded 2017 fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. The pre-eminent representative of American scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, the ACLS offers up to a year of funding for in-depth exploration of a topic that expands the understanding of the human experience. Three historians — Mariana Candido, Deborah Tor, and Evan Ragland — were among the 71 ACLS fellows selected from a pool of nearly 1,200 applicants. Katherine Brading, a professor of philosophy, is a member of one of nine teams to win a collaborative research fellowship.

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Notre Dame International Security Center begins significant expansion with new hires, paper series, and conference planning

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

The first pieces in the expansion of the Notre Dame International Security Center (NDISC) are in place, as the once-small program builds toward its long-term goal as a thought leader in American grand strategy. Led by Director Michael Desch, a professor in the Department of Political Science, NDISC recently hired three new faculty members and brought on board three postdoctoral fellows. 

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Psychology undergraduates thrive through research experiences, building connections with faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Research

For Katie Paige and Laura Heiman, research hasn’t just shaped their undergraduate experiences—it’s shaped their futures, as well. The two senior psychology majors have both gained significant research experience throughout their time at Notre Dame, writing senior theses and working closely with faculty members as they study topics ranging from depression to childhood development.

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Historian Darren Dochuk exploring American oil and religion with support from NEH

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Darren Dochuk, associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of History, will spend a year exploring the connection between religion and the oil industry with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The NEH has offered Dochuk both a fellowship and a Public Scholar Award for the project, which will allow him to complete his book, Anointed With Oil: God and Black Gold in America’s Century.

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Department of Political Science adds experts in American and comparative politics to faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science added two new faculty members this year, growing its roster of experts in American and comparative politics. Assistant Professor Jeff Harden, previously an assistant professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, studies American politics, including political representation, public policy diffusion, and state politics. Assistant Professor Michael Hoffman studies Middle East politics and democratization.

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Hope and Optimism project funds philosophical research, awards playwrights and video producers

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

An interdisciplinary research collaboration between the University of Notre Dame and Cornell University has awarded more than $344,000 to seven projects in the final year of the program that explores the theoretical, empirical, and practical dimensions of hope and optimism, as well as related states such as pessimism, anxiety, and despair. The project, Hope and Optimism: Conceptual and Empirical Investigations, also announced the winners of its Hope on Stage and Hope on Screen contests, which challenged artists to create both original plays and original films that explored the concept of hope.

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Program of Liberal Studies associate professor wins fellowship to further research on Renaissance intellectual

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Robert Goulding, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Program of Liberal Studies and the History and Philosophy of Science program, has won a yearlong fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, where he will finish a book on Renaissance thinker Thomas Harriot. About 200 scholars from around the world are chosen each year to work with 28 permanent faculty at the IAS.

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Spanish major uses Fulbright grant to develop youth program for at-risk teens in Chile

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

After spending part of an undergraduate study abroad trip working with struggling teen mothers in Chile, Lauren Antosz ’16 left with the nagging feeling there was more she could do. She’ll get the chance with a grant from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, helping to develop a program that supports at-risk youth achieve higher outcomes. Antosz, who majored in Spanish, is one of a record 29 Notre Dame Fulbright Scholars for the 2016-17 year.

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The Experience Project awards $650,000 in second round of research funding

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

More than $650,000 has been awarded to 15 projects in the second year of a research collaboration aimed at building new understanding about how religious and transformative experiences occur and shape lives. The Experience Project, a $5.1 million project supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation, aims to answer questions about how religious experiences affect a person’s concept of God; how transformative experiences can affect a person’s identity, values, belief system and behaviors; and how religious and other types of transformative experiences differ.

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Two key figures honored for career contributions to Department of Film, Television, and Theatre

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Arts, and Faculty News

Two faculty members and former chairs who were instrumental in the development of the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre are taking their final bows. Mark Pilkinton, who expanded the department in the 1980s and pushed for the building of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, retired this summer. Donald Crafton unified the department during his tenure as chair and expanded it to include film and television studies. He will retire after the fall semester.

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Anthropologist wins ACLS fellowship to digitally analyze Brazilian indigenous language

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

When the Wauja people tell a story about their history and culture, the words they choose convey a deep meaning about the indigenous Brazilian tribe’s interconnectedness to its landscape. Christopher Ball wants to delve into that relationship between language and place. Funded by an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship, the assistant professor of anthropology is exploring how the Wauja people use words to create an identity that ties their culture to a nearby river and chronicling that meaning for future generations.

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English professor wins ACLS fellowship to study medieval marginalia

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton studies medieval texts, many of them on sheepskins and fragile after hundreds of years in conditions not always suited for preservation. The Notre Dame Professor of English studies the margins of these medieval texts, which contain thoughts scrawled by some of the brightest minds of the time. They are a layer of interaction and understanding that Kerby-Fulton will spend the next year studying, supported by a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. 

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Scholar of Portuguese language, Brazilian culture joins Arts and Letters faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Marcio Bahia is coming to Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures with his eyes focused squarely on Brazil. A scholar of Brazilian culture and language, Bahia will join the College of Arts and Letters faculty this fall with a focus on accelerating the growth of the Portuguese program.

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Historian Wins Phi Beta Kappa Award for Book on Philology

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Phi Beta Kappa

For his book pulling together the complex history of philology and how Western humanistic learning split into the modern humanities that we know today, Notre Dame historian James Turner has received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award. The honor is given for books in literary scholarship or criticism and is named for a distinguished Princeton University scholar, teacher, and dean. Turner’s book, Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities, looks at how learned researchers once included languages, history, and texts in a single broad field of study that came to be known as philology.

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Guggenheim Foundation awards fellowships to two Arts and Letters professors

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Notre Dame seal

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has awarded two of its prestigious 2016 fellowships to faculty in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters. The fellowships, which fund a diverse group scholars, artists, and scientists, will go to Anjan Chakravartty, a professor in the Department of Philosophy, and Stephen Fallon, the Rev. John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities in the Program of Liberal Studies and the Department of English.

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Why Majoring in English Made Patrick Lyons ’08 a Better Doctor

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News and Alumni

Patrick Lyons Icon

Dr. Patrick Lyons ’08 doesn’t ask his patients if they have questions when he’s finished talking with them about a diagnosis. There’s a good chance they’ll say no. Instead, he asks what questions they have. Looking at how he practices medicine now, especially in his interactions with patients, Lyons realizes his time as an English major had a profound effect on how he communicates. “English prepared me well because I have the ability to think critically and organize and analyze the information in front of me,” he said. “Word choice and the way you’re addressing patients can be really powerful.”

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Two Arts and Letters faculty win ACLS fellowships

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Notre Dame seal

Two faculty members from Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have won 2016 fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, the Notre Dame Professor of English, will pursue a book project that explores the notes that medieval readers made in the margins of historic texts and books in order to rediscover sophisticated early reading practices for understanding the self. Christopher Ball, an assistant professor of anthropology, will spend time with an indigenous tribe in Brazil studying local history and culture through connections between language and nearby rivers.

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Theology Professor Wins Fellowship to Spend Year Researching in Jerusalem

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Gary Anderson

Gary Anderson, Hesburgh Professor of Catholic Theology at Notre Dame, will spend a year in Jerusalem working with an international group of scholars to better understand how early Jews, Christians, and Muslims read, understood, and interpreted the stories told in the Bible’s early chapters. Anderson is part of a team of scholars from North America, Israel, and Europe accepted this fall to conduct research at the Israel Institute for Advanced Studies at Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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Music Professor Named Honorary Member of Irish Musicology Society

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

susan_youens_icon

Susan Youens, J. W. Van Gorkom Professor of Music in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, has been named an honorary member of the Society for Musicology in Ireland, a distinction awarded for extraordinary contribution to musicology in that country. Youens, widely considered one of the world’s foremost authorities of German song, particularly the work of Franz Schubert and Hugo Wolf, said the honor was especially sweet because of a long-standing relationship she’s had with a group of Irish musicologists dedicated to Schubert’s work.

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Urban Sociologist Joins Arts and Letters Faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Robert Vargas

Robert Vargas, an urban sociologist whose research focuses on violence and health care, is joining Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology this fall as an assistant professor. Vargas, who will also be a faculty affiliate in the Institute for Latino Studies at Notre Dame, was previously on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a fellow at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation at Harvard University. Vargas’ first book, Wounded City: Violent Turf Wars in a Chicago Barrio (Oxford University Press), will be released May 1. In it, Vargas argues that competition among political groups contributes to the persistence of violence just as much as the competition among street gangs.

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Anthropologists’ New Books Illuminate Challenges of Human Migration That Span Centuries

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Donna Glowacki and Maurizio Albahari

Their subjects are separated by hundreds of years and thousands of miles, yet two recent books by Notre Dame anthropologists have striking similarities on the driving forces behind human migration. Living and Leaving: A Social History of Regional Depopulation in Thirteenth-Century Mesa Verde, by Associate Professor Donna Glowacki, untangles the web of reasons why an entire culture simply packed up and left the Four Corners region nearly 800 years ago. Crimes of Peace: Mediterranean Migrations at the World’s Deadliest Border, by Assistant Professor Maurizio Albahari, examines why African and Middle Eastern migrants and refugees risk their lives attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea. The books have played a major role in establishing Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology as a source of insight and perspective on significant social issues.

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ESTEEM Program Inspires Arts and Letters Majors to be Innovative Entrepreneurs

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Alumni

ESTEEM icon

Take the skills liberal arts majors already have — analysis, communication, creative collaboration, critical thinking. Now add intensive training in business and entrepreneurship. That’s a recipe for success, according to College of Arts and Letters alumni who have gone on to Notre Dame’s Engineering, Science & Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Master’s program (ESTEEM). The 11-month professional master’s degree program has primarily trained students with STEM backgrounds in business and entrepreneurship to spur the launch of startup companies. It is now also actively recruiting Arts and Letters majors.

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German Professor Wins Article Prize for Analysis of 1959 Oscar-Winning Documentary

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Tobias Boes

There was this old German documentary that played on television all the time in the 1980s. Tobias Boes often watched it as a child. A few years ago, he decided to revisit the film, Serengeti Shall Not Die. This time, he saw something different—something that prompted him to write an article that won him the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Article Prize for best article published in the journal German Studies Review in 2013-2014. He received the award at the annual meeting of the German Studies Association late last year.

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Washington Program Kickstarts Political and Policy Careers for Notre Dame Students

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Alumni, and Centers and Institutes

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Through the Washington Program, a semester-long immersion into national politics and policy, Notre Dame students head to the nation’s capital for coursework and organized visits with policymakers, journalists, and leaders in a variety of governmental and non-governmental offices. Participants also complete internships at the White House, congressional offices, major media outlets, non-governmental organizations, and nonprofits.

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Political Science Alumna Translates Service Experience to Career at Facebook

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Centers and Institutes

Kaitlin Sullivan

Before the rigors of post-college life set in—before mortgages, family, a career, and all the other responsibilities that come with setting off into the world—Kaitlin Sullivan ’10 wanted to devote at least one year of her life to service. Sullivan remembers talking with professors and fellow students at Notre Dame about how the purpose of their education wasn’t just learning for the sake of learning, but to help them to go out and do good in the world. It’s a perspective she carried into her service experience—and in her professional career as a product policy manager for Facebook.

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Professor, Cushwa Center Director Begins Leadership of American Catholic Historical Association

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Kathleen Sprows-Cummings

Pope Francis has ignited increased public interest in the future of the Catholic Church, and Kathleen Sprows Cummings hopes she can use that to remind people of the Church’s past. Cummings, an associate professor of American studies and history and the William W. and Anna Jean Cushwa Director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at Notre Dame, begins her term this month as vice president/president-elect of the American Catholic Historical Association.

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