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Two Arts and Letters faculty win ACLS fellowships

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, and General News

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Two faculty members from Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have won 2016 fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, the Notre Dame Professor of English, will pursue a book project that explores the notes that medieval readers made in the margins of historic texts and books in order to rediscover sophisticated early reading practices for understanding the self. Christopher Ball, an assistant professor of anthropology, will spend time with an indigenous tribe in Brazil studying local history and culture through connections between language and nearby rivers.

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Theology Professor Wins Fellowship to Spend Year Researching in Jerusalem

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Catholicism, Research, and General News

Gary Anderson

Gary Anderson, Hesburgh Professor of Catholic Theology at Notre Dame, will spend a year in Jerusalem working with an international group of scholars to better understand how early Jews, Christians, and Muslims read, understood, and interpreted the stories told in the Bible’s early chapters. Anderson is part of a team of scholars from North America, Israel, and Europe accepted this fall to conduct research at the Israel Institute for Advanced Studies at Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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Music Professor Named Honorary Member of Irish Musicology Society

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

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Susan Youens, J. W. Van Gorkom Professor of Music in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, has been named an honorary member of the Society for Musicology in Ireland, a distinction awarded for extraordinary contribution to musicology in that country. Youens, widely considered one of the world’s foremost authorities of German song, particularly the work of Franz Schubert and Hugo Wolf, said the honor was especially sweet because of a long-standing relationship she’s had with a group of Irish musicologists dedicated to Schubert’s work.

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Urban Sociologist Joins Arts and Letters Faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Robert Vargas

Robert Vargas, an urban sociologist whose research focuses on violence and health care, is joining Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology this fall as an assistant professor. Vargas, who will also be a faculty affiliate in the Institute for Latino Studies at Notre Dame, was previously on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a fellow at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation at Harvard University. Vargas’ first book, Wounded City: Violent Turf Wars in a Chicago Barrio (Oxford University Press), will be released May 1. In it, Vargas argues that competition among political groups contributes to the persistence of violence just as much as the competition among street gangs.

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Anthropologists’ New Books Illuminate Challenges of Human Migration That Span Centuries

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, and General News

Donna Glowacki and Maurizio Albahari

Their subjects are separated by hundreds of years and thousands of miles, yet two recent books by Notre Dame anthropologists have striking similarities on the driving forces behind human migration. Living and Leaving: A Social History of Regional Depopulation in Thirteenth-Century Mesa Verde, by Associate Professor Donna Glowacki, untangles the web of reasons why an entire culture simply packed up and left the Four Corners region nearly 800 years ago. Crimes of Peace: Mediterranean Migrations at the World’s Deadliest Border, by Assistant Professor Maurizio Albahari, examines why African and Middle Eastern migrants and refugees risk their lives attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea. The books have played a major role in establishing Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology as a source of insight and perspective on significant social issues.

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ESTEEM Program Inspires Arts and Letters Majors to be Innovative Entrepreneurs

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Alumni, General News, and Graduate Students

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Take the skills liberal arts majors already have — analysis, communication, creative collaboration, critical thinking. Now add intensive training in business and entrepreneurship. That’s a recipe for success, according to College of Arts and Letters alumni who have gone on to Notre Dame’s Engineering, Science & Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Master’s program (ESTEEM). The 11-month professional master’s degree program has primarily trained students with STEM backgrounds in business and entrepreneurship to spur the launch of startup companies. It is now also actively recruiting Arts and Letters majors.

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German Professor Wins Article Prize for Analysis of 1959 Oscar-Winning Documentary

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

Tobias Boes

There was this old German documentary that played on television all the time in the 1980s. Tobias Boes often watched it as a child. A few years ago, he decided to revisit the film, Serengeti Shall Not Die. This time, he saw something different—something that prompted him to write an article that won him the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Article Prize for best article published in the journal German Studies Review in 2013-2014. He received the award at the annual meeting of the German Studies Association late last year.

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Washington Program Kickstarts Political and Policy Careers for Notre Dame Students

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Alumni, Undergraduate News, and General News

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Through the Washington Program, a semester-long immersion into national politics and policy, Notre Dame students head to the nation’s capital for coursework and organized visits with policymakers, journalists, and leaders in a variety of governmental and non-governmental offices. Participants also complete internships at the White House, congressional offices, major media outlets, non-governmental organizations, and nonprofits.

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Political Science Alumna Translates Service Experience to Career at Facebook

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Alumni, and General News

Kaitlin Sullivan

Before the rigors of post-college life set in—before mortgages, family, a career, and all the other responsibilities that come with setting off into the world—Kaitlin Sullivan ’10 wanted to devote at least one year of her life to service. Sullivan remembers talking with professors and fellow students at Notre Dame about how the purpose of their education wasn’t just learning for the sake of learning, but to help them to go out and do good in the world. It’s a perspective she carried into her service experience—and in her professional career as a product policy manager for Facebook.

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Professor, Cushwa Center Director Begins Leadership of American Catholic Historical Association

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Kathleen Sprows-Cummings

Pope Francis has ignited increased public interest in the future of the Catholic Church, and Kathleen Sprows Cummings hopes she can use that to remind people of the Church’s past. Cummings, an associate professor of American studies and history and the William W. and Anna Jean Cushwa Director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at Notre Dame, begins her term this month as vice president/president-elect of the American Catholic Historical Association.

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Economics Department Adds Faculty Experts in Education, Energy, Sovereign Debt, Consumer Markets

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

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Notre Dame’s Department of Economics added expertise in education, energy, sovereign debt, and consumer market behavior with the appointments this fall of four new faculty members. The fast-growing department is continually looking to add faculty who best fit with its mission and the University’s mission, said William Evans, the Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Economics and chair of the department, which often leads to new hires with varying research and teaching interests. That’s exactly the case with new assistant professors Christiane Baumeister, Chloe Gibbs, and Zachary Stangebye and assistant teaching professor Forrest Spence.

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Historian Receives NEH Public Scholar Grant to Examine ‘Bible Wars’

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

Linda Przybyszewski

Notre Dame historian Linda Przybyszewski has been selected as one of the first winners of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ new Public Scholar Grant Program, which aims to bring the humanities to larger audiences and make scholarship relevant to contemporary life. Her forthcoming book will tell the story of the Cincinnati Board of Education’s decision to stop Bible reading in public schools and the ensuing court battles that riveted the nation in the late 1860s and early 1870s.

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Hope and Optimism Project Awards Nearly $2 Million to 18 Research Projects

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

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An interdisciplinary research collaborative between the University of Notre Dame and Cornell University has awarded nearly $2 million to 18 projects in five countries. The researchers will examine the theoretical, empirical, and practical dimensions of hope and optimism. The project, Hope and Optimism: Conceptual and Empirical Investigations, is funded through a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation and additional money from Notre Dame and Cornell.

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The Experience Project Awards $1.7 Million to 22 Research Projects

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

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A research collaboration that aims to build new understanding about how religious and transformative experiences occur and shape people’s lives is awarding its first round of funding with more than $1.7 million going to 22 projects. The Experience Project, supported by a John Templeton Foundation grant, looks to answer questions about how religious experiences affect a person’s concept of God; how transformative experiences can affect a person’s identity, values, and behaviors; and how types of transformative experiences differ.

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Professor Wins ACLS Fellowship to Explore Political Philosophy in Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Eileen Hunt Botting

Eileen Hunt Botting’s students have suggested, only half jokingly, that had someone only given Dr. Victor Frankenstein’s creature a hug, a lot of violence and tragedy could have been avoided. Botting, an associate professor of political science, has come to believe those students aren’t far from Shelley’s main point—that so much can go wrong when society shirks its responsibilities for its most vulnerable citizens. She will get to elaborate on that theory over the course of a year thanks to an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship supporting her book project, Frankenstein and the Question of Human Development.

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