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Research by ND Sociologist Christian Smith Helps Shape Nationwide Catholic Initiative

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

“Strong Catholic Families, Strong Catholic Youth,” an initiative that brings Catholic parishes and schools together with Catholic families to strengthen and deepen their faith, is now active in some 60 dioceses in the United States and Canada. According to those who conceived, organized and now direct this new and growing movement in youth ministry, social science research conducted by Christian Smith, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology and director of Notre Dame’s Center for the Study of Religion and Society, has been instrumental in the development of the program.

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Notre Dame’s Campus Ministry Office Launches New Smartphone App

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

The University of Notre Dame’s Office of Campus Ministry has launched a new smartphone application accessible to all Apple and Android devices. The free app, which is available from the Apple Store and Android Market by searching “Notre Dame Daily Faith,” includes a calendar of campus liturgies, meetings of prayer groups, performances of sacred music, retreats, lectures and seminars.

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Education Research Center to Build Global Scholarly Network

Author: Bill Schmitt

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s Center for Research on Educational Opportunity (CREO) has been designated an “international research network” by the World Education Research Association (WERA). This recognition of CREO’s leadership in the sociology of education will open new doors for international scholarly collaborations in research on educational inequality.

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Theresa Rebeck: Alumna, Playwright, Producer, Novelist

Author: Tara Hunt ’12

Categories: General News and Alumni

Theresa Rebeck ’80 says she has a playwright’s brain. The critics and her peers apparently agree: Not only is she an a Pulitzer Prize for Drama nominee and National Theatre Conference Award winner, but Rebeck was also invited to participate in the prestigious Eugene O’Neill National Playwrights Conference in summer 2012 to develop her new play, Fool. She was one of just eight playwrights selected out of nearly 1,000 applicants, an honor she shared with another participant from Notre Dame, Anne García-Romero, who is an assistant professor in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre.

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Professor Brings Animation to Life in New Book and Course

Categories: General News, Research, Arts, and Faculty News

Whether we’re driving down the highway, scrolling our Facebook newsfeeds, or flipping through television channels, various forms of animation bombard us constantly. “Even if you don’t watch television, you see these images on your phone, your iPad, even billboards when you drive down the road,” says Donald Crafton, the Joseph and Elizabeth Robbie Professor of Film, Television, and Theatre at Notre Dame.

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Video: Meet American Studies Major Olivia Lee

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Alumni, and Internationalism

“As a freshman I was interested in psychology and history and English and anthropology and political science. I chose American studies because I’ve been able to take all of those while also studying issues of race and gender, religion, politics,” says Olivia Lee, an American studies and peace studies major in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters.

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Video: Meet Music Major Samantha Osborn

“We study not only the pieces of music that these composers wrote but where they grew up, who they learned music from, and how previous composers influenced the type of music that they wrote,” says Samantha Osborn, a music major in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters. “You really can’t understand a piece of music until you understand the history, politics, art—all of the influences that helped create that piece of music.”

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Older Adults Don’t Speak 'Robot,' Study Finds

Categories: General News and Research

In order to effectively program robots that ultimately could be used to aid seniors, researchers at the University of Notre Dame and University of Missouri studied the type of language older adults used when describing the location of a desired object to either a robot or human-like avatar. It turns out that seniors become tongue-tied when talking to robots.

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Notre Dame Researchers Using Smart Devices to Measure Emotionality of Offline Communication

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

A team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame and Texas A&M University are developing an innovative system using smart devices to measure the emotionality of offline communications. The interdisciplinary effort is designed to examine whether the increasing prevalence of online interactions may be inhibiting the development of strong, reciprocal, and emotionally significant offline social ties.

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Ph.D. Student Explores Humanity’s Relationship to Natural Environment

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, and Alumni

Justin Farrell, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology, is interested in how human values, morality, and religion impact our responses to environmental problems. His dissertation analyzes the cultural dimensions of environmental policy conflict in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The study is funded primarily by a three-year U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Graduate STAR Fellowship for Environmental Studies.

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Alumnus Finds Success as Hollywood Screenwriter

Author: Gabriela Leskur

Categories: General News and Alumni

Behind the mask, the cape, and the suit of every superhero stands a seemingly ordinary individual blessed with an incredible gift. Behind Captain America stands Stephen McFeely ’91. The English and goverment major is part of the screenwriting duo behind the Captain America movies, the Narnia trilogy, and Pain & Gain, as well as the Primetime Emmy Award-winning biopic The Life and Death of Peter Sellers.

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ND Expert: NSA’s Alleged Spying on EU 'Not Surprising'

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Amid allegations that the U.S. National Security Agency spied on European Union institutions, European officials expressed outrage and predicted serious repercussions. But according to University of Notre Dame Political Scientist Michael Desch, an expert in international security, these latest developments should not be surprising to anyone. “This is a reaffirmation of the old adage that when it comes to diplomacy, countries don’t have permanent allies, only permanent interests,” Desch says.

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New Study Looks at Unintended Costs of Mandated Infertility Coverage

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

The rate of triplet or higher-order multiple births increased by 26 percent between 1996 and 2002 in seven states mandating insurance coverage for infertility treatments, costing an additional $900 million in delivery costs alone, according to a new study by University of Notre Dame economist Kasey Buckles. The study will be published in the July issue of Health Economics.

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New Research on Catholic Generosity Finds Giving Stems From Conscious Effort

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Massive catastrophes, the globally televised images of human suffering they generate, and the innate compassion of ordinary people invariably combine to unleash impressive feats of giving, but a new University of Notre Dame study suggests that generosity, at least among American Catholics, may be more complicated than that.

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ND Expert: Brazilian Authorities’ Blunders Fuel Protests

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

By agreeing to increase public transportation fares just two weeks before hosting the FIFA Confederations Cup, coupled with the repressive reaction to protesters by military police in Sao Paulo, Brazilian authorities have transformed a struggle for free transportation into a major wave of protest against political corruption and inequality, according to Guillermo Trejo, University of Notre Dame political scientist and fellow in the Kellogg Institute for International Studies.

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New Sociologist Focuses on Immigration

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Jennifer Jones, the newest faculty member in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology, focuses her teaching and research on the ways in which immigration policies affect the experiences and identities of various minority groups in the United States. “I liked observing the dynamics around race in other countries and that got me interested in comparing race relations and how race works here,” she explains.

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Rising Senior Alex Coccia Named Truman Scholar

Alex Coccia, an Africana studies and peace studies major in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, has been named a 2013 Truman Scholar. Established in 1975 as a “living memorial” to President Harry S. Truman, the prestigious scholarship includes $30,000 in graduate study funds, priority admission and supplemental financial aid at select institutions, leadership training, career and graduate school counseling, and internship opportunities within the federal government. Nationwide, just 60 to 65 college juniors are selected as Truman scholars each year, based on leadership potential, intellectual ability, and likelihood of “making a difference.”

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Historian Jon Coleman Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

Author: Mike Danahey

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

His two books thus far have explored American tales of wolves, bears, mountain men, and the truths behind myths. Now, Notre Dame History Professor Jon T. Coleman has been awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship to work on an environmental history of movement in America before the widespread use of automobiles and airplanes.

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Video: Arts and Letters Summer Internship Program Grants

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

To support students as they pursue these opportunities across the country and around the world, the College and the Career Center developed the Arts and Letters Summer Internship Program (ALSIP). Open to rising sophomores and juniors in the College, ALSIP provides stipends to defray travel and living expenses that might otherwise make an internship cost prohibitive. Recent ALSIP grant recipients include Kelly Taylor, a film, television, and theatre and American studies major who interned for the Late Show with David Letterman, and Alisa Rantanen, an industrial design major who interned at Insight Product Development in Chicago.

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