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Music Professor Named Honorary Member of Irish Musicology Society

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

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Susan Youens, J. W. Van Gorkom Professor of Music in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, has been named an honorary member of the Society for Musicology in Ireland, a distinction awarded for extraordinary contribution to musicology in that country. Youens, widely considered one of the world’s foremost authorities of German song, particularly the work of Franz Schubert and Hugo Wolf, said the honor was especially sweet because of a long-standing relationship she’s had with a group of Irish musicologists dedicated to Schubert’s work.

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Urban Sociologist Joins Arts and Letters Faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Robert Vargas

Robert Vargas, an urban sociologist whose research focuses on violence and health care, is joining Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology this fall as an assistant professor. Vargas, who will also be a faculty affiliate in the Institute for Latino Studies at Notre Dame, was previously on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a fellow at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation at Harvard University. Vargas’ first book, Wounded City: Violent Turf Wars in a Chicago Barrio (Oxford University Press), will be released May 1. In it, Vargas argues that competition among political groups contributes to the persistence of violence just as much as the competition among street gangs.

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Notre Dame to Host World Premiere Opera Adaptation of Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Arts, General News, and Undergraduate News

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For the first time ever, the University of Notre Dame will host the world premiere of an opera—a commissioned production of As You Like It, the classic Shakespearian comedy. The four-show run is a highlight of “Shakespeare: 1616-2016,” a yearlong series of campus events commemorating the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. Given the location of its premiere, the production features numerous Notre Dame touchstones.

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Philosopher Wins Article Prize for Research on Aquinas, Abstractionism

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Therese Cory

How do we form abstract concepts—like “dog”—given that we only experience concrete, particular objects—like “Fido”? Therese Scarpelli Cory, a Notre Dame assistant professor of philosophy, examined Aquinas’ answer to this question in her article, “Rethinking Abstractionism: Aquinas’ Intellectual Light and Some Arabic Sources.” Her work, published in the Journal of the History of Philosophy, was awarded the publication’s 2015 best article prize in January.

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English Assistant Professor Wins Ford Foundation Fellowship

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Z'etoile Imma

Z’étoile Imma, an assistant professor of English at Notre Dame, has received a prestigious Ford Foundation fellowship in support of her research in South Africa on 20th-century activist Simon Nkoli. Imma is one of 116 top scholars to receive an award through the foundation’s fellowship program, administered by the National Research Council of the National Academies. The program seeks to increase diversity among university faculties, maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and increase the number of professors who use diversity as a resource for enriching education.

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Anthropologists’ New Books Illuminate Challenges of Human Migration That Span Centuries

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Donna Glowacki and Maurizio Albahari

Their subjects are separated by hundreds of years and thousands of miles, yet two recent books by Notre Dame anthropologists have striking similarities on the driving forces behind human migration. Living and Leaving: A Social History of Regional Depopulation in Thirteenth-Century Mesa Verde, by Associate Professor Donna Glowacki, untangles the web of reasons why an entire culture simply packed up and left the Four Corners region nearly 800 years ago. Crimes of Peace: Mediterranean Migrations at the World’s Deadliest Border, by Assistant Professor Maurizio Albahari, examines why African and Middle Eastern migrants and refugees risk their lives attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea. The books have played a major role in establishing Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology as a source of insight and perspective on significant social issues.

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Irish studies and English professor wins René Wellek Prize for ‘Languages of the Night’

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

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Barry McCrea, the Donald R. Keough Family Professor of Irish Studies and a professor of English, Irish language and literature, and Romance languages and literatures, has been awarded the René Wellek Prize by the American Comparative Literature Association for the best book in the past year in comparative literature. McCrea’s Languages of the Night: Minor Languages and the Literary Imagination in Twentieth-Century Ireland and Europe explores how the decline of rural languages and dialects in 20th-century Europe shaped ideas about language and literature and exerted a powerful influence on literary modernism. The prize is generally considered to be the most prestigious award in the field of literary studies.

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Video: Meet Neuroscience Major Maureen Tracey

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Maureen Tracey

The neuroscience and behavior major is a collaboration between the College of Arts and Letters and the College of Science. Students combine coursework in psychology, chemistry, biology, and other fields to study the nature of mind, brain, and behavior. The interdisciplinary approach prepares neuroscience majors to pursue medical school, graduate school, lab work, or clinical research. “Neuroscience really allows you to explore your options, and you certainly have a lot of them,” said junior Maureen Tracey.

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Hesburgh Libraries Now Accepting Submissions for Undergraduate Library Research Award

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Hesburgh Library

Entries are now being accepted for the 7th annual Undergraduate Library Research Award competition sponsored by the Hesburgh Libraries and the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement. Established in 2010 to promote critical thinking, intellectual discovery, and the advancement of lifelong learning, the ULRA recognizes undergraduate students who demonstrate excellent research skills by their broad use of library expertise, resources, collections, and services in their scholarly and creative projects. Last year’s winners included three students from the College of Arts and Letters. A total of $3,000 in cash prizes will be awarded to six 2016 winners.

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Arabic Professor Wins Book Award for Research on Medieval Islamic Plays

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Li Guo

Before Li Guo could tell the story of one of Islam’s most impactful artists, he spent nearly 15 years translating and studying the man’s work. A professor of Arabic and director of Notre Dame’s Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies Program, Guo is the author of The Performing Arts of Medieval Islam: Shadow Play and Popular Poetry in Ibn Daniyal’s Mamluk Cairo, which won the 2015 Prize for Research from the Institut International De La Marionnette (IIM) in northern France. Guo’s book details the life and work of Ibn Daniyal, a 13th-century eye doctor who wrote a number of shadow plays—an ancient storytelling form involving flat puppets—depicting life in medieval Cairo.

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Political Science Alumna Brings Passion for Service to West Hollywood Mayor’s Office

Author: Tessa Bangs

Categories: Alumni and General News

Lindsey Horvath '04

Lindsey Horvath ’04 had one goal for her future—to be of service to others. At Notre Dame, she developed a broad range of skills that would help her pursue that goal, both in her career and in her community. The political science and gender studies major now serves as mayor of West Hollywood, Calif., in addition to owning an entertainment advertising agency.

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ESTEEM Program Inspires Arts and Letters Majors to be Innovative Entrepreneurs

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Alumni, General News, and Graduate Students

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Take the skills liberal arts majors already have — analysis, communication, creative collaboration, critical thinking. Now add intensive training in business and entrepreneurship. That’s a recipe for success, according to College of Arts and Letters alumni who have gone on to Notre Dame’s Engineering, Science & Technology Entrepreneurship Excellence Master’s program (ESTEEM). The 11-month professional master’s degree program has primarily trained students with STEM backgrounds in business and entrepreneurship to spur the launch of startup companies. It is now also actively recruiting Arts and Letters majors.

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German Professor Wins Article Prize for Analysis of 1959 Oscar-Winning Documentary

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Tobias Boes

There was this old German documentary that played on television all the time in the 1980s. Tobias Boes often watched it as a child. A few years ago, he decided to revisit the film, Serengeti Shall Not Die. This time, he saw something different—something that prompted him to write an article that won him the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Article Prize for best article published in the journal German Studies Review in 2013-2014. He received the award at the annual meeting of the German Studies Association late last year.

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Psychologist Named Fellow of American Educational Research Association

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Darcia Narvaez

Notre Dame psychologist Darcia Narvaez has been named a fellow of the American Educational Research Association, an honor bestowed on academics with notable and sustained research achievements. Narvaez, a professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Letters, is one of 22 scholars who will be inducted as fellows at the AERA’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on April 9.

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Graduate Students on the Clock in Research Competition

Author: Sue Lister

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, and Research

Three Minute Thesis competition

Nine University of Notre Dame graduate students will compete for prize money and a bid to the regional championships during the Three Minute Thesis competition on March 16. Known as 3MT, the competition features graduate students across all disciplines explaining their research in clear and succinct language appropriate for an audience of specialists and non-specialists alike, all within three minutes. The three finalists from the College of Arts and Letters are Ph.D. candidates Tony Cunningham and Caroline Hornburg from psychology, and Laura Bland from the history and philosophy of science program.

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Carter Snead, Director of Center for Ethics and Culture, Named to Pontifical Academy for Life

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, and General News

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Carter Snead, William P. and Hazel B. White Director of the University of Notre Dame’s "Center for Ethics and Culture and professor of law, has been appointed to the Pontifical Academy for Life, the pope’s principal advisory group on the promotion of the consistent ethic of life in the Catholic Church.Founded in 1994 by Saint Pope John Paul II, the academy meets annually, holds conferences, publishes reports and collaborates with partners in the Vatican Curia and worldwide.

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Sacred Music Program Director Featured in 'Women Lead' Profile Series

Author: Office of Strategic Content

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Margot Fassler

The power to lead is the power to transform. Notre Dame is proud to celebrate women whose scholarship and leadership are leaving an indelible imprint on the global community. Margot Fassler, Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Music History and Liturgy, director of the Sacred Music at Notre Dame Program, and a professor of musicology and ethnomusicology, was featured in the University’s Women Lead series as one of five female faculty in prominent leadership roles across campus.

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Economist's Research Shows Fluidity of U.S. Labor Market Declining for Three Decades

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Abigail Wozniak

The decline in the fluidity, or dynamism, of the U.S. labor market has been occurring along a number of dimensions — including the rate of job-to-job transition, hires and separations, and geographic movement across labor markets — since at least the 1980s, and these declines are all related, according to a new paper to be presented next week at the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity. The research by three members of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors and Abigail Wozniak, Notre Dame associate professor of economics, examines declines in fluidity across eight measures of labor market transitions.

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Medieval History Ph.D. Candidate Awarded DAAD Fellowship to Study in Germany

Author: Tessa Bangs

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

Megan Welton

Inspired by her extensive research on a 10th-century German empress, Ph.D. candidate Megan Welton set her sights early on a scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), which provides funding for American students to study in Germany. Her patience and planning paid off recently, when she was awarded the scholarship to study for a year in Essen. “My success in winning a DAAD fellowship is directly linked with the immense support that I have received as a part of the Medieval Institute and as part of the wider Notre Dame community,” she said.

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Video: History Major Conducts Senior Thesis Research at Korean Diplomatic Archives

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Internationalism, and Research

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Seung-Jae “David” Oh, a senior history major, spent the summer of 2015 in Seoul doing archival research at the Diplomatic Archives of Korea. He gathered documents produced by the South Korean foreign ministry to get a better understanding of the bilateral relationship between South Korea and the United States. His research, supported in part by the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program, will inform his senior thesis, focusing on a tumultuous period between 1979 and 1983 when a movement for democracy clashed with South Korea’s authoritarian government.

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