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Father Jenkins, Dean McGreevy reflect on 50th anniversary of Land O'Lakes Statement and the future of Catholic higher education

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

In his opening remarks for “Land O’Lakes and Its Legacy,” on September 5, Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., suggested that among the essential activities of a university is to engage in discussion and debate about what its proper activities are. The examination included a lecture and panel discussion with four other Catholic university presidents in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the drafting and signing of the Land O’Lakes Statement. Arts and Letters Dean John T. McGreevy opened the event with a talk on the historical contexts of Land O’Lakes. He pointed to the impact of Vatican II, shifts in university and faculty governance, and a more global Church as essential backdrops for understanding the intentions of Land O’Lakes.

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Video: Chinese literature and culture professor Michel Hockx on censorship, China, and literary communities

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

“I'm interested in literature as product of a community and the way in which they decide what to include, what not to include, what is good, what is bad, how they choose to engage with censorship or not engage with censorship,” said Michel Hockx, professor of Chinese literature and culture in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures in the College of Arts and Letters and director of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies. Hockx has published works both in English and in Chinese on early 20th-century Chinese print culture as well as contemporary Internet culture in China.

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Spanish major hones language skills to prepare for career in medicine

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

In summer 2016, Notre Dame senior Andrew Grose studied abroad in Spain — taking a headfirst dive into a language and culture he loved and had studied for years. The experience confirmed for him that whatever path he takes after graduation, Spanish will be a part of it. Grose, a Spanish and preprofessional studies major, is planning a career in medicine and knows his language skills will be a valuable asset — a fact that was underscored in a course on Latin America he took last fall.

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Mark Cummings receives lifetime achievement award from American Psychological Association

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Cummings, the William J. Shaw Center for Children and Families Professor of Psychology at Notre Dame, recently won the 2017 Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contribution to Developmental Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s developmental psychology section. Over the past 35 years, he has done extensive research to show that inter-parental relationships, father-child relationships, and other family relationships and processes are related to children’s short-term and long-term adjustment and well-being. With research projects in Northern Ireland, Colombia, Israel, Croatia, and Iran, he is also examining how political violence affects children's emotional security and development.

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Political science professor wins prestigious book award for research on women’s suffrage

Author: Emily McConville

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

In the nearly 100 years since women won the right to vote, a conventional wisdom about the aftermath of the 19th Amendment developed. Christina Wolbrecht believed that conventional wisdom needed to be challenged. In her book, the Notre Dame professor of political science and her co-author investigated and often upended long-held assumptions about women’s suffrage and offered new insight into the largest expansion of the electorate in American history. Their efforts earned them the American Political Science Association’s Victoria Schuck Award for the best book on women and politics published in the past year.

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Notre Dame Department of Film, Television, and Theatre announces 2017-18 theatre season

Author: Stacey Stewart

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Arts, and Faculty News

Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) announces four productions for its 2017-18 theatre season, with two comedies, including the beloved The Importance of Being Earnest; an absurdist classic relevant to the current political climate; and the Tony Award-winning musical Spring Awakening.

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New French professor brings expertise in contemporary literature to Department of Romance Languages and Literatures

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

The French phrase extrême contemporain is the perfect description for what Sonja Stojanovic is most passionate about — the study of French literature written in the past decade or so. She waits with great anticipation for her favorite authors to release new books and enjoys talking with those writers because she is “right there as it is happening.” “Sometimes you are the first one to write on an author, which is very exciting,” she said. Stojanovic joins Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures this fall as an assistant professor of French.

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‘Uncharted territory’: Creative writing students draw inspiration from Ireland’s rich literary history

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

They wrote poetry in Dublin coffee shops over plates of scones and artfully embellished cappuccinos — the curl of steam and lilt of Irish conversation rising and fading in the background. They wrote prose on the grassy shores of Lough Pollaacapull, where the towers and crenellations of Kylemore Abbey reflect in the waters below. They wrote in the Abbey’s common room into the wee hours of the morning. And everywhere, the 16 students in Notre Dame’s first Creative Writing Workshop in Ireland found inspiration — in the landscape, in the country’s literary history, and in each other.

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Catholic university presidents to reflect on 50-year Land O’Lakes legacy

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, in collaboration with the Office of the President, will host five Catholic university presidents on Sept. 5 for a lecture and panel to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the drafting and signing of the Land O’Lakes Statement.

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Professor’s research on state legislatures wins American Political Science Association book award

Author: Renee Peggs

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Jeff Harden, an assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science, has won the American Political Science Association’s Virginia Gray Award for the best book on U.S. state politics or policy published in the preceding three calendar years. In Multidimensional Democracy: A Supply and Demand Theory of Representation in American Legislatures, Harden examines the relationship between what citizens want from their elected state lawmakers and what legislators adopt as their top priorities while in office.

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NIH awards $3.5 million to Shaw Center for Children and Families for research on intellectual and developmental disabilities

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

The National Institutes of Health awarded a new $3.5 million grant to Notre Dame’s William J. Shaw Center for Children and Families in support of a project for families that include a child with intellectual or developmental disabilities. The new Supporting Parent-Adolescent Relationships and Communication (ND-SPARC) project is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention program to support families that include an individual with intellectual or developmental disabilities. 

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One-person play on Notre Dame founder to premiere Aug. 30

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: General News, Alumni, Catholicism, and Arts

The University of Notre Dame will premiere Sorin: A Notre Dame Story, a one-person play about the life and work of the University’s founder, Rev. Edward Sorin, C.S.C., on Aug. 30 (Wed.) at 6:42 p.m. in the Patricia George Decio Theatre of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. This production celebrates the 175th anniversary of the University through the collaborative creative work of four notable alumni of Notre Dame's College of Arts and Letters: director Patrick Vassel '07, playwright Christina Telesca Gorman '91, performer Matthew Goodrich '09, and projection designer Ryan Belock '11.

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Theology professors archive the rise of the contemporary Latin American Catholic Church

To preserve and share the history of political upheaval that ultimately changed the Latin American Catholic Church, Notre Dame researchers are collecting a variety of audio recordings, handwritten documents, and texts to develop a digital library of critical events that took place throughout Latin America over more than 60 years and ultimately changed the Catholic Church.

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Video: The Arts at Notre Dame inspire passion and enrich education

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Arts, and Faculty News

Enlightening. Enriching. Challenging. Sacred. Through the arts, you can find inspiration. Broaden understanding. Build community. And make a difference in the world. Notre Dame is home to a vibrant arts community with world-class facilities, internationally renowned faculty and visiting artists, and remarkable student engagement.

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Completion of Nanovic Hall brings social sciences students and faculty together

Nanovic Hall, the state-of-the-art new home to the Departments of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology, their affiliated centers and programs, and the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, includes laboratory and research spaces, classrooms, and offices, all designed to encourage interaction between faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students. It features a soaring, three-story forum to be used for events, the latest video conferencing technology in each of the departmental suites, and a formal mediation room modeled after the United Nations that has translation capabilities for up to three languages.

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Video: Notre Dame Washington Program offers opportunity to learn, live, and work in nation's capital

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Centers and Institutes

Sophomores and juniors from any major or college at the University of Notre Dame may participate in the semester-long Washington Program. Students live in apartments in downtown Washington, D.C., and take classes focused on politics and policy while also interning part-time with government offices, members of Congress, media companies, or cultural institutions. Students gain professional experience, learn to network, and experience the unique opportunities of big city living. 

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Historic project at Notre Dame nearing completion

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: Graduate Students, Undergraduate News, Research, Catholicism, Arts, and Faculty News

The largest construction project in the 175-year history of the University of Notre Dame – an 800,000-square-foot integration of world-class space for teaching, research, performances, faith, multimedia, student life and athletics – is nearing completion, with several components now open or opening over the next two weeks and most of the other facilities ready for occupancy in January. The buildings include the new homes of the Deparment of Anthropology, Department of Psychology, Department of Music, and Sacred Music at Notre Dame.

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Professor wins NEH grant to encourage teaching philosophy as a way of life

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Meghan Sullivan, a University of Notre Dame professor of philosophy, has won a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to support a two-week NEH Summer Institute on teaching philosophy as a way of life. The program will gather 25 faculty from across the country who are interested in developing courses that explore the concrete recommendations that various philosophical movements propose for achieving the good life. Sullivan teaches the introductory philosophy course God and the Good Life at Notre Dame.

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FTT majors use film to bring criminal justice issues to light

Author: Megan Valley

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Research

Notre Dame seniors John Haley and Julia Szromba see documentaries as a powerful tool — to change policy, to change laws, and to change minds. The two film, television, and theatre (FTT) majors recently completed Respectfully, Tony, a short documentary that shines a light on the U.S.’s mass incarceration problem and challenges people to rethink their opinions of the death penalty. The film has now been selected for multiple film festivals across the country.

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Art history professor named academic director of Rome Global Gateway

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Heather Hyde Minor, professor of art history, has been appointed academic director of the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway by Michael Pippenger, vice president and associate provost for internationalization. During her two-year term, Hyde Minor will hold full academic oversight of the Gateway, including the Rome undergraduate program and efforts to enhance the University’s research profile in Rome and beyond. Hyde Minor succeeds Theodore J. Cachey Jr., Ravarino Family Professor of Italian and director of the William and Katherine Devers Program in Dante Studies. 

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Psychologist wins Expanded Reason Award for research on neurobiology and morality development

Author: Theo Helm

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Darcia Narvaez, professor of psychology in the Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and a fellow in the Institute for Educational Initiatives, has been named one of two winners of the first Expanded Reason Award for research. The award was given by University Francisco de Vitoria and the Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI Vatican Foundation to recognize innovation in scientific research and academic programs based on Benedict XVI’s proposal to broaden the horizons of reason. Narvaez’s book, Neurobiology and the Development of Human Morality: Evolution, Culture and Wisdom, was chosen from among more than 360 total entries from 170 universities and 30 countries. 

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JoAnn DellaNeva named academic director of London Global Gateway

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

DellaNeva, a professor in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, will hold full academic oversight of the Gateway during her two-year term, including the London undergraduate program and efforts to enhance the University’s research profile in London and beyond. A faculty member since 1982, DellaNeva also served as chair of her department from 1989-96 and as associate dean for undergraduate studies in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters from 2010-17.

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LEO earns $700,000 in funding awards to support continued anti-poverty work

Author: Rachel Fulcher-Dawson

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

The Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO) at the University of Notre Dame has received multiple funding awards totaling nearly $700,000 this summer to continue its work reducing poverty and improving lives through evidence-based programs and policies. “We are excited about and thankful for the support from these funders,” said James Sullivan, co-founder of LEO and the Rev. Thomas J. McDonagh, C.S.C., Associate Professor of Economics. “This will allow us to continue to create evidence that supports programs doing innovative work to serve the poor.”

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Lilly Endowment awards $1.6 million grant for Sacred Music at Notre Dame program

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Catholicism, Arts, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame has received a $1.6 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to support the Sacred Music at Notre Dame (SMND) program and its transformative work with graduate students and the community. This is the program’s second grant from the Lilly Endowment — a private, philanthropic foundation that supports the causes of religion, education, and community development — following a $1.9 million grant in 2012 that helped launch SMND.

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Notre Dame research funding reaches record-breaking levels

Author: Joanne Fahey and Brandi Klingerman

Categories: General News and Research

The University of Notre Dame has received $138.1 million in research funding for fiscal year (FY) 2017, surpassing the previous record of $133.7 million set in FY 2015. Approximately 57.8 percent of the research awards came from federal funding, while 26.9 percent came from foundations or other sponsors, and 15.3 percent came from industry.

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New English and Africana studies professor Ernest Morrell brings faith and love of teaching to Notre Dame

Author: Theo Helm

Categories: Faculty News and Catholicism

Ernest Morrell’s passion to better serve at-risk youth and their families and help break the cycle of poverty led him to embark on a prolific academic career, where he has formed a generation of future teachers, scholars, and leaders dedicated to improving the lives of marginalized urban youth. Morrell joins Notre Dame’s faculty this summer, as he assumes the Coyle Professorship in Literacy Education, with appointments in the Department of English, the Department of Africana Studies, and the Institute for Educational Initiatives.

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English professor commemorates 'American icon' Thoreau with new biography

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

As the 200th birthday of American icon Henry David Thoreau is celebrated around the world on July 12, Laura Dassow Walls, author of the comprehensive biography Henry David Thoreau: A Life, will be commemorating the date in Concord, Massachusetts, Thoreau’s birthplace. Walls, the William P. and Hazel B. White Professor of English, is a leading scholar of Thoreau. Thoreau: A Life, the first comprehensive biography of the life of Thoreau since Walter Harding’s The Days of Henry Thoreau was published in 1965, was officially released by the University of Chicago Press Wednesday.

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With NEH fellowship, Notre Dame philosopher breaks new ground on Aristotle’s concept of objectivity

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Can humans truly attain an accurate, objective view of reality? Or is our perspective inescapably colored by who we are and what we’ve experienced? Philosopher Sean Kelsey asserts that this problem is central to Aristotle’s text De Anima — and that Aristotle argued we can, a point his predecessors had tried and failed to make.

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