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Notre Dame Forum Events to Explore Future of American Democracy

Categories: Faculty News and General News

The 2012-13 Notre Dame Forum, “A More Perfect Union: The Future of America’s Democracy,” will present a series of events throughout the academic year that will explore profound questions about the state of the U.S. political system and its capacity to deal with the rapidly changing domestic and international challenges it faces.

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History Major Plus Internship a Powerful Combination

Author: Chris Milazzo

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Think about the study of history, and you might conjure images of dusty books and timelines. But Notre Dame history majors John Karol and Christine Affleck, both Class of 2012, and senior Jordyn Smith demonstrate how the versatile skills they developed in the College of Arts and Letters can be applied to a wide array of challenging internships and career paths.

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New Book Proposes Reconciliation as Path to Peace

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

A new book by political scientist and peace studies scholar Daniel Philpott makes the case for forgiveness and reconciliation as a way to achieve justice and lasting peace after violent conflict. Just and Unjust Peace: An Ethic of Political Reconciliation, recently released by Oxford University Press, explores the concept of reconciliation, which is deeply rooted in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, as well as in the secular restorative justice movement.

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On the Path to the Foreign Service

Author: Mary Kate Malone

Categories: Alumni, Centers and Institutes, General News, and Internationalism

While working as a national sales planner at Univision Television Group in 2009, Melissa Fisher ’07 began to feel restless. She wasn’t sure what direction to take next but knew she had to think more about what she wanted to do with her life, even if that meant taking a leap into the unknown. And so that’s exactly what she did: She quit her job and bought a one-way ticket to Cambodia. “I wanted to challenge myself and live in a developing country where I didn’t know the language,” says the former political science and Spanish double major. “I felt like I needed to do something challenging, to grow up and be on my own.”

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New Faculty Propel Economics Department’s Rise

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Alumni, Faculty News, and General News

Timothy Fuerst, one of the most-cited economists in the world, is joining the University of Notre Dame this fall as William J. and Dorothy K. O’Neill Professor of Economics. Fuerst’s appointment is the “crown jewel” in a series of recent hires that will bring even greater depth and diversity to the rapidly growing Department of Economics, says Chair Richard Jensen, the Gilbert F. Schaefer Professor of Economics.

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Preeminent New Testament Scholar Comes to Notre Dame

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: Faculty News and General News

Professor John T. Fitzgerald, an award-winning teacher, will join the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Theology this fall, says J. Matthew Ashley, associate professor and department chair. “He is not only a preeminent scholar of the New Testament in itself but also has a broad and penetrating knowledge of the Greco-Roman context in which it was written and received,” Ashley says.

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Revisiting America’s Revolutionary Myths and Realities

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Most Americans are comfortable fixing a date (July 4) and an event (the signing of the Declaration of Independence) to a definitive moment when the United States separated itself from its colonial parent, Great Britain. But for University of Notre Dame historian Patrick Griffin, the revolution is better understood as a process—not an event.

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Political Scientist Geoffrey Layman Wins APSA Article Award

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Geoffrey Layman, professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science, has won the 2012 Jack Walker Outstanding Article Award for “Activists and Conflict Extension in American Party Politics,” published by the American Political Science Review in 2010. Bestowed by the Political Organizations and Parties section of the American Political Science Association (APSA), the award recognizes an article published within the past two years that has made a significant contribution to research and scholarship on political organizations and parties.

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Alumna Honored for Redesign of Breast Cancer Procedure

Author: Mike Danahey

Categories: Alumni, Arts, General News, and Research

With her graduate thesis project, University of Notre Dame alumna Charlotte Lux, M.F.A. ’11, set out to redesign a stressful diagnostic procedure women who might have breast cancer undergo in the hopes of making it less traumatic. The resulting design has earned Lux recognition in the 2012 Core77 Design Awards, where she was named student winner in the strategy and research category.

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Study Shows Official Measures of American Poverty Off-Base

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

The U.S. Census Bureau’s method of calculating who is poor and who is not has been under fire by researchers for years because it doesn’t calculate the benefits of anti-poverty programs—such as food stamps and housing subsidies—into its formula. In response to the criticism, the Census Bureau released in the fall of 2011 the Supplemental Poverty Measure to more accurately assess poverty in America. Though the new supplemental measure uses a definition of income that is conceptually closer to resources available for consumption than pretax money income, a new study by University of Notre Dame economist James X. Sullivan finds that even the Supplementary Poverty Measure provides an inaccurate reflection of deprivation in this country.

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Study: Telling Fewer Lies Linked to Better Health and Relationships

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

“Pants on fire” isn’t the only problem liars face. New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that when people managed to reduce their lies in given weeks across a 10-week study, they reported significantly improved physical and mental health in those same weeks. The “Science of Honesty” study was presented recently at the American Psychological Association’s 120th annual convention.

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