Latest News

Economics graduate student evaluates violence-reduction strategies in Mexico

Policy research by Reyes Ruiz González, a graduate student in economics and Ph.D. fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, was recently published by Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, a leading public policy think tank that promotes economic opportunity, prosperity, and peace. The case study, coauthored by Arturo Ramírez Verdugo, analyzes successful subnational approaches to reducing violence related to drug trafficking and organized crime that spiked in two of Mexico’s northernmost states in 2009–11.

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Arts and Letters undergraduate receives Lord Acton Memorial Scholarship

Author: Emily Beaudoin '17

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

King Fok, a a junior majoring in sociology and Arts and Letters pre-health with a minor in international development studies, has been awarded the 2016 Lord Acton Memorial Scholarship for his semester of study at Notre Dame’s London Global Gateway. Launched by the Association of American Study Abroad Programmes (AASAP/UK), the Lord Acton Memorial Scholarship rewards a “deserving student” who “demonstrates an understanding and appreciation of the value of an international educational experience.”

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New book born from Notre Dame conference on polarization in the Catholic Church

Author: Olivia Hall

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

While universality—and unity amid diversity—is a fundamental characteristic of Roman Catholicism, all-too-familiar issues related to gender, sexuality, race, and authority have wrought the church with internal conflict and no clear path to finding middle ground. A new book, co-edited by Mary Ellen Konieczny, intends to start the conversation about the polarization in the Catholic Church through healthy debates and genuine engagement.

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Sociologist Terence McDonnell explores impact of “cultural entropy” on media campaigns in Ghana

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

A new book by Notre Dame Sociologist Terence McDonnell examines why expensive media campaigns that try to harness the power of culture to change beliefs or behavior often fail. Using AIDS campaigns in Ghana as his central case study, he lays out an argument that carries important implications for diverse types of media campaigns around the world.

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Video: Learning Italian and expanding horizons in Rome

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News and Internationalism

“Rome is just amazing. There’s no other city like it,” said Andrew Guinan, a senior Italian and accounting major at the University of Notre Dame. Guinan spent the 2016 spring semester in Notre Dame International’s Rome study abroad program, and he stayed through the summer to intern with the Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation Commission. A student of Italian since his first year at Notre Dame, Guinan found himself supported by Notre Dame's extensive resources in the city, based at the Rome Global Gateway.

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Video: Commitment to real-world impact drives continued excellence in economics research at Notre Dame

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

The Department of Economics at the University of Notre Dame conducts impactful research using the best available theoretical and empirical methods in the discipline, all while fostering the Catholic mission of the University. With specialties in macroeconomics, applied micro economics, development economics, and game theory, Notre Dame economics faculty and graduate students work together to find answers to a wide array of difficult economic, social, and policy-relevant questions. In this new video, Notre Dame economists talk about some of the department’s pioneering research projects and its approach to graduate education and faculty development. 

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History and Romance languages professor wins prize for research on colonial Latin America

Author: Shaun Zinck

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Karen Graubart loves a good puzzle. In a Peruvian archive this summer, the Notre Dame associate professor of history and Romance languages and literatures found a piece of a puzzle that reshaped how many scholars view colonial Latin American rule. Her research discovery supports arguments she recently made in her article in Hispanic American Historical Review, which won the Conference on Latin American History’s 2015 James Alexander Robertson Memorial Prize.

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PLS and classics major Ann Gallagher awarded Monteverdi Prize to study in Italy

Author: Megan Valley

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

Senior Ann Gallagher won the 2016 Monteverdi Prize through Notre Dame’s Program of Liberal Studies (PLS), allowing her to spend the summer as a scholar-in-residence at Monteverdi Tuscany, an Italian hotel and center for the liberal arts founded by PLS alumnus Michael Cioffi ’75. The Monteverdi Prize, a scholarship created by the Cioffi family for PLS majors, also includes research funding for the summer and $10,000 toward the recipient’s university student account.

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Theology professor uses NEH fellowship to research Qur’an’s portrayal of God’s vengeance and mercy

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

The Qur’an describes God as a god of mercy. The Qur’an describes God as a god of vengeance. Are those qualities mutually exclusive? Gabriel Said Reynolds doesn’t think so. The Notre Dame professor of Islamic studies and theology is using a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to explore the idea. He’s spending a year researching the way the Muslim holy text juxtaposes narratives of God’s destruction with declarations of God’s compassion.

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Video: Medieval studies major illustrates the story of Charlemagne's elephant

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

When honors medieval studies major Karen Neis ’16 took a class on Charlemagne, the unusual story of the emperor’s prized elephant resonated with her. She recalled that story when it came time to choose a senior thesis, ultimately leading her to produce an illustrated children’s book, Abul Abbas, The Elephant. The book recounts the journey of the elephant a caliph gave as a gift to Charlemagne around the year 800. In the story, a Christian, a Jew, and a Muslim all work together to transport the elephant 3,000 miles from Baghdad to Aachen.

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Video: Professor David Campbell on political involvement and civic engagement

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

David Campbell is the Packey J. Dee Professor of American Democracy and chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include American politics, civic engagement, political behavior, religion and politics, and education policy. In this video, he discusses his research on why people do—or, increasingly do not—get involved in politics.

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Romance languages and literatures associate professor receives Sheedy Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Marisel Moreno, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, has been selected to receive the 2016 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award, the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters. Moreno, whose research and teaching focus on Latino literature and culture, helped launch a community-based learning program in her department in 2010. Students in her classes enhance traditional literature study by volunteering at La Casa de Amistad, a local Latino community organization.

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French professor to write a ‘capitalist’ history of literature with support from NEH fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

French literature has received a lot of attention lately from an unexpected source—economists. Julia Douthwaite, a professor of French in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, wants to evaluate their interpretations and delve deeper into literary representations of money. Douthwaite has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities—her second—for her book project on the topic, tentatively titled Financiers We Have Known: A Capitalist History of Literature.

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English graduate student wins Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

César Soto wants to know how the spark of political revolution can transform religious concepts of community and inclusion. To better understand the issue, he’s turning to the literature of England, Ireland, and Mexico in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Soto, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of English with a graduate minor in Irish studies, has been awarded a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2016-17 to support his project.

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Two Arts and Letters graduate students awarded Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Graduate Students, and Research

Graduate students Filippo Gianferrari and Adriana Monica Solomon have been awarded Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships to delve deeper into the lives and impact of two intellectual archetypes—Dante and Isaac Newton, respectively. Gianferrari, a Ph.D. candidate in the Medieval Institute, is investigating the Latin authors who may have influenced Dante. And Solomon, a philosophy Ph.D. candidate in the History and Philosophy of Science Program at the John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, is shining a light on Newton’s lesser-known contributions to philosophy and science.

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