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PLS and classics major Ann Gallagher awarded Monteverdi Prize to study in Italy

Author: Megan Valley

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

Senior Ann Gallagher won the 2016 Monteverdi Prize through Notre Dame’s Program of Liberal Studies (PLS), allowing her to spend the summer as a scholar-in-residence at Monteverdi Tuscany, an Italian hotel and center for the liberal arts founded by PLS alumnus Michael Cioffi ’75. The Monteverdi Prize, a scholarship created by the Cioffi family for PLS majors, also includes research funding for the summer and $10,000 toward the recipient’s university student account.

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Theology professor uses NEH fellowship to research Qur’an’s portrayal of God’s vengeance and mercy

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

The Qur’an describes God as a god of mercy. The Qur’an describes God as a god of vengeance. Are those qualities mutually exclusive? Gabriel Said Reynolds doesn’t think so. The Notre Dame professor of Islamic studies and theology is using a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to explore the idea. He’s spending a year researching the way the Muslim holy text juxtaposes narratives of God’s destruction with declarations of God’s compassion.

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Video: Medieval studies major illustrates the story of Charlemagne's elephant

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

When honors medieval studies major Karen Neis ’16 took a class on Charlemagne, the unusual story of the emperor’s prized elephant resonated with her. She recalled that story when it came time to choose a senior thesis, ultimately leading her to produce an illustrated children’s book, Abul Abbas, The Elephant. The book recounts the journey of the elephant a caliph gave as a gift to Charlemagne around the year 800. In the story, a Christian, a Jew, and a Muslim all work together to transport the elephant 3,000 miles from Baghdad to Aachen.

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Video: Professor David Campbell on political involvement and civic engagement

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

David Campbell is the Packey J. Dee Professor of American Democracy and chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include American politics, civic engagement, political behavior, religion and politics, and education policy. In this video, he discusses his research on why people do—or, increasingly do not—get involved in politics.

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Romance languages and literatures associate professor receives Sheedy Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Marisel Moreno, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, has been selected to receive the 2016 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award, the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters. Moreno, whose research and teaching focus on Latino literature and culture, helped launch a community-based learning program in her department in 2010. Students in her classes enhance traditional literature study by volunteering at La Casa de Amistad, a local Latino community organization.

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French professor to write a ‘capitalist’ history of literature with support from NEH fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

French literature has received a lot of attention lately from an unexpected source—economists. Julia Douthwaite, a professor of French in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, wants to evaluate their interpretations and delve deeper into literary representations of money. Douthwaite has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities—her second—for her book project on the topic, tentatively titled Financiers We Have Known: A Capitalist History of Literature.

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English graduate student wins Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

César Soto wants to know how the spark of political revolution can transform religious concepts of community and inclusion. To better understand the issue, he’s turning to the literature of England, Ireland, and Mexico in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Soto, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of English with a graduate minor in Irish studies, has been awarded a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2016-17 to support his project.

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Two Arts and Letters graduate students awarded Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Graduate Students, and Research

Graduate students Filippo Gianferrari and Adriana Monica Solomon have been awarded Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships to delve deeper into the lives and impact of two intellectual archetypes—Dante and Isaac Newton, respectively. Gianferrari, a Ph.D. candidate in the Medieval Institute, is investigating the Latin authors who may have influenced Dante. And Solomon, a philosophy Ph.D. candidate in the History and Philosophy of Science Program at the John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, is shining a light on Newton’s lesser-known contributions to philosophy and science.

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Hope and Optimism project funds philosophical research, awards playwrights and video producers

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

An interdisciplinary research collaboration between the University of Notre Dame and Cornell University has awarded more than $344,000 to seven projects in the final year of the program that explores the theoretical, empirical, and practical dimensions of hope and optimism, as well as related states such as pessimism, anxiety, and despair. The project, Hope and Optimism: Conceptual and Empirical Investigations, also announced the winners of its Hope on Stage and Hope on Screen contests, which challenged artists to create both original plays and original films that explored the concept of hope.

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Notre Dame launches new Ph.D. programs in Italian and Spanish

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

The University of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters has launched two rigorous new doctoral programs in Italian and Spanish designed to train world-class literary scholars in the languages and literatures of Italy, the Iberian Peninsula, and Latin America. As the first new graduate degrees formed since the creation of the College’s innovative 5+1 Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, the curriculum and structure has been designed to incentivize and facilitate timely degree completion.

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Historian Ted Beatty wins 2016 AHA Friedrich Katz Prize

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Edward “Ted” Beatty, professor of history, associate dean for academic affairs at the Keough School of Global Affairs, and faculty fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, has been selected as the winner of the 2016 Friedrich Katz Prize for his book Technology and the Search for Progress in Modern Mexico (University of California Press, 2015). The Katz Prize is awarded annually by the American Historical Association (AHA) to honor the best book in Latin American and Caribbean history.

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Program of Liberal Studies associate professor wins fellowship to further research on Renaissance intellectual

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Robert Goulding, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Program of Liberal Studies and the History and Philosophy of Science program, has won a yearlong fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, where he will finish a book on Renaissance thinker Thomas Harriot. About 200 scholars from around the world are chosen each year to work with 28 permanent faculty at the IAS.

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Notre Dame enhances data sciences infrastructure for social science research

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Notre Dame Research has embarked on an initiative this academic year to identify the infrastructure support needs for social scientists across campus and to find approaches to fill those needs. Information gathering has begun and Vice President for Research Robert Bernhard welcomes the thoughts of faculty and students about how the University can advance its social sciences programs of research and scholarship. 

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Department of History adds scholars of American and French history to faculty

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Notre Dame’s Department of History adds three new faculty members this fall, strengthening its scholarship in 19th century American history, 20th century American history, and 18th and 19th century French history. Katie Jarvis and Emily Remus join the department as assistant professors, while James “Jake” Lundberg will be director of undergraduate studies.

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The Experience Project awards $650,000 in second round of research funding

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

More than $650,000 has been awarded to 15 projects in the second year of a research collaboration aimed at building new understanding about how religious and transformative experiences occur and shape lives. The Experience Project, a $5.1 million project supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation, aims to answer questions about how religious experiences affect a person’s concept of God; how transformative experiences can affect a person’s identity, values, belief system and behaviors; and how religious and other types of transformative experiences differ.

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Department chair elected to prestigious historical institute’s governing body

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Patrick Griffin, the Madden-Hennebry Professor of History and chair of Notre Dame’s Department of History, has been elected to the Council of the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. Founded in 1943 at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, the Institute supports research on the history and cultures of North America from 1450 to 1820.

 

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Two key figures honored for career contributions to Department of Film, Television, and Theatre

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Arts, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Two faculty members and former chairs who were instrumental in the development of the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre are taking their final bows. Mark Pilkinton, who expanded the department in the 1980s and pushed for the building of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, retired this summer. Donald Crafton unified the department during his tenure as chair and expanded it to include film and television studies. He will retire after the fall semester.

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Six history graduate students win Fulbright Awards in record-breaking year

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, and Research

From investigating the lives of medieval Islamic scholars to studying 15th-century manuscripts from the confessors of Burgundy, history graduate students at Notre Dame are traveling the world to conduct original research. Six Ph.D. students in the Department of History have been awarded 2016-17 research grants from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program.

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Global Dome Exchange Program: Crossing boundaries and borders

Author: Rina Buznea

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

Global Dome Exchange Program

the London Global Gateway hosted the fourth annual Global Dome Exchange Program, an intensive seminar designed to accelerate dissertation progress and build international networks of young scholars in the humanities. The program facilitated conversations between 15 graduate students and 18 guest faculty—with diverse interests spanning literature and history—from the University of Notre Dame, University of Oxford, King’s College London, and University of Edinburgh.

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Notre Dame psychologist looks at the toll of daily stressors on long-term health

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

How people react to stress–both psychologically and physically–can have implications for a person’s health and well-being, including how well they age. Professor of Psychology and Associate Vice President for Research Cindy Bergeman is conducting a 10-year study based on how different people respond to stress, why they react the way they do, and the different ways people cope.

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LEO’s James Sullivan presents homelessness prevention study on Capitol Hill

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

James X. Sullivan

James Sullivan, Rev. Thomas J. McDonagh, C.S.C., Associate Professor of Economics and co-founder of the Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities at the University of Notre Dame, will participate in a briefing to Congressional members, staff and other key stakeholders on Thursday (Sept. 15) about the impact of emergency assistance on homelessness.

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In new book, Arts and Letters dean reveals Jesuits’ impact on global history

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Alumni, Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

In his new book, American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global (Princeton University Press), McGreevy uses individual religious experiences and others as a gateway to a larger narrative. The book traces how the religious order grew from 600 men in 1814 to roughly 17,000 men a century later. McGreevy argues that their odyssey of expulsion (by European nationalists worried about excessive Jesuit loyalty to the papacy) and reconstruction (as Jesuits launched a counterculture centered around parishes, schools, and universities) powerfully shaped modern history.

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New FTT assistant professor brings humanistic focus to study of video games

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Matthew Payne will join Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT) as an assistant professor this fall, bringing research and teaching interests that range from the rapidly evolving field of video games and interactive entertainment to convergent media, new media literacy, media representations of war, and ethnographic audience research. His book, Playing War: Military Video Games After 9/11, examines how games like the Call of Duty and Battlefield series “transform international strife into interactive fun."

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Video: Joshua Lund, associate professor of Spanish, on the poetics of paramilitarism

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

“When we think about paramilitarism, we tend to think about a rather contemporary history around counterinsurgency warfare, but that moment is actually linked to a much longer history that goes back to the very formation of modern American states,” said Joshua Lund, associate professor of Spanish at the University of Notre Dame. Lund studies Latin American film, literature, and cultural politics. His published works include two books, The Mestizo State (2012) and The Impure Imagination (2006), a co-edited volume of scholarship on Gilberto Freyre, and essays on a range of cultural topics.

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Annual research funding at Notre Dame tops $128 million

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Professor Amy Hixon works with an undergraduate researcher in her Stinson-Remick Lab, Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental and Earth Studies

The University of Notre Dame has received $128 million in research funding for fiscal year 2016 — the second highest in its history. In fiscal year 2015, the University’s research funding was its highest of all time, reaching $133 million.

“The research, scholarship and creativity of Notre Dame faculty continues to make a difference in multiple ways across our country and around the world,” said Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., the University’s president. “The growth in external funding is a tangible testimony to the importance of their work.”

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In Fifty Years with Father Hesburgh, Schmuhl paints warm portrait of former president

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C., president of the University of Notre Dame from 1952 to 1987, was one of the nation’s most influential figures in higher education and national affairs and a well-known figure on campus. In the 1960s, a student named Robert Schmuhl, covering what Father Hesburgh called “the student revolution” for the Associated Press, began what would be a lifelong relationship with the president. Schmuhl, now the Walter H. Annenberg-Edmund P. Joyce Chair in American Studies and Journalism at Notre Dame, is the author of Fifty Years with Father Hesburgh: On and Off the Record, released Aug. 25 by University of Notre Dame Press.

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Anthropologist wins ACLS fellowship to digitally analyze Brazilian indigenous language

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

When the Wauja people tell a story about their history and culture, the words they choose convey a deep meaning about the indigenous Brazilian tribe’s interconnectedness to its landscape. Christopher Ball wants to delve into that relationship between language and place. Funded by an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship, the assistant professor of anthropology is exploring how the Wauja people use words to create an identity that ties their culture to a nearby river and chronicling that meaning for future generations.

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English professor wins ACLS fellowship to study medieval marginalia

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton studies medieval texts, many of them on sheepskins and fragile after hundreds of years in conditions not always suited for preservation. The Notre Dame Professor of English studies the margins of these medieval texts, which contain thoughts scrawled by some of the brightest minds of the time. They are a layer of interaction and understanding that Kerby-Fulton will spend the next year studying, supported by a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. 

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Scholar of Portuguese language, Brazilian culture joins Arts and Letters faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Marcio Bahia is coming to Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures with his eyes focused squarely on Brazil. A scholar of Brazilian culture and language, Bahia will join the College of Arts and Letters faculty this fall with a focus on accelerating the growth of the Portuguese program.

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