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Two Arts and Letters graduate students named Humanities Without Walls fellows

Author: Nora Kenney

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, and General News

Caitlin Smith-Oyekole, a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in English, and Sevda Arslan, a second-year Ph.D. student in anthropology, have been named 2018 Humanities Without Walls (HWW) pre-doctoral workshop fellows. Supported by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, HWW is a consortium of 15 Midwestern humanities institutes fostering cross-institutional collaboration in humanities-based research, teaching, and scholarship. 

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College of Arts and Letters announces new minor in data science

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Faculty News

The College of Arts and Letters is launching a new, interdisciplinary minor in data science. Housed in the Department of Sociology with support from the College of Engineering’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering, the program will be open to students in any college. “Data science impacts every industry today,” said Sarah Mustillo, professor and chair of sociology. “It is becoming increasingly important for solving problems and making decisions."

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American studies professor named to Norman Rockwell Center’s new Society of Fellows

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Arts

Erika Doss, a Notre Dame professor of American studies, has been named to the first-ever Society of Fellows for the Norman Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies. Established to bring leading thinkers to the study of nearly 200 years of American illustration art, the group hopes to more fully develop the language and discourse of an academic discipline devoted to published art.

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Prominent women in political office boost female candidates down ballot, new research finds

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

The presence of a prominent female officeholder has a positive effect on the number of women running for lower offices in her state, according to new research by University of Notre Dame political scientist Jeffrey J. Harden. A state with a female governor or U.S. senator will see an increase in the proportion of women seeking state legislative office by about 2 to 3 percentage points, Harden and two co-authors wrote in an article published this month in the American Journal of Political Science.

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Notre Dame senior Brittany Ebeling named Michel David-Weill Laureate

An international economics major with a concentration in French and a supplementary major in peace studies, Brittany Ebeling has been named the 2018 Michel David-Weill Laureate, allowing her to pursue a fully funded two-year master’s degree program at the prestigious Paris Institute of Political Studies, or “Sciences Po.” The scholarship is awarded each year to one American who exemplifies the core values of Sciences Po alumnus Michel David-Weill, namely, academic excellence, leadership, multiculturalism, tolerance, and high achievement.

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Irish language and literature professor wins ACLS fellowship for research on bardic poetry

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Sarah McKibben, an associate professor of Irish language and literature, has won a prestigious fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies for her book project, “Tradition Transformed: Bardic Poetry and Patronage in Early Modern Ireland, c. 1560-1660.” McKibben, who is also a faculty fellow in the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, focuses her scholarship on bardic poetry in Ireland during the 16th and 17th centuries. 

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Sarah Mustillo appointed I.A. O'Shaughnessy Dean of College of Arts and Letters

Author: Patrick Gibbons

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Sarah A. Mustillo, department chair and professor of sociology at the University of Notre Dame, has been appointed I.A. O’Shaughnessy Dean of the College of Arts and Letters by University President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. She succeeds John T. McGreevy, who is stepping down July 1 after serving 10 years as dean. An expert in the social causes of childhood mental illness and statistical methods used in social science research, Mustillo joined the Notre Dame faculty in 2014, after serving seven years as a professor of sociology at Purdue University and six years on the faculty at Duke University School of Medicine. She has served as chair of the Department of Sociology since 2016.

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Notre Dame psychologists hope to make virtual reality the next frontier in treating phobias

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

For a team of Notre Dame psychologists, virtual reality is more than a game — it is the next frontier in mental health treatment. Nathan Rose, Jennifer Hames, and Michael Villano are conducting research on the use of virtual reality environments in exposure therapy for participants with a fear of heights. The technology also holds promise for treating phobias like the fear of flying and post-traumatic stress disorder.

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In memoriam: Mary Ellen Konieczny, Henkels Family Associate Professor of Sociology

Author: Kate Garry

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Catholicism

Mary Ellen Konieczny, the Henkels Family Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, died Feb. 24 as a result of complications from cancer. She was 58. A faculty fellow of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, she studied religion and conflict, the family and public politics.

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Study points to fertility as a leading economic indicator

Author: Shannon Roddel

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

New research from the University of Notre Dame discovers people appear to stop conceiving babies several months before recessions begin. The study, “Is Fertility a Leading Economic Indicator?” was published in the National Bureau of Economic Research’s working paper series. It is coauthored by Notre Dame economists Kasey Buckles and Daniel Hungerman, and Steven Lugauer from the University of Kentucky.

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Video: Rev. Daniel G. Groody, C.S.C., on studying international migration and refugees as a theological issue

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Rev. Daniel G. Groody, C.S.C. is associate professor of theology and global affairs and the director of the Kellogg Global Leadership Program. His research interests include migration and the US-Mexican border, international migration, and refugees.

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Notre Dame among top producers of Fulbright students for fourth straight year

Twenty-nine University of Notre Dame students and alumni were awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants during the 2017-18 academic year, placing Notre Dame second among all research institutions in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Of the 29 students to receive Fulbrights last year, 22 were Arts and Letters students — which would place the College eighth in the nation among all doctoral institutions. Arts and Letters alone produced more Fulbright winners than the University of California at Berkeley, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, Cornell University, and Johns Hopkins.

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Six new faculty join Department of Economics, continuing significant growth

Author: Katie Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Six new faculty have joined the Department of Economics this year, bringing expertise in a wide variety of subfields and significant experience conducting research at the federal level. The new additions — professor of the practice Timothy Dunne; assistant professors Kirsten Cornelson, Illenin Kondo, Benjamin Pugsley, and Jasmine Xiao; and research assistant professor Sarah Kroeger — join a department undergoing remarkable growth. It has added 22 faculty members in the last five years, thanks in part to its selection as one of 10 essential research areas through the University’s Advancing Our Vision program.

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Anthropologist delivers prestigious Gifford Lectures at the University of Edinburgh

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Agustín Fuentes, the Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Endowed Chair in Anthropology, has been selected to deliver the 2018 Gifford Lectures at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Founded by the jurist Adam Lord Gifford, the renowned lecture series invites pre-eminent scholars to address topics related to theology, philosophy, and science. Fuentes is the second consecutive College of Arts and Letters faculty member to be chosen.

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How an international economics and peace studies major found his mission — conducting research that helps refugees and Italian locals

Author: Katie Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

When Francesco Tassi arrived at Notre Dame, he was sure he would major in finance. But a lecture on refugees set him on a different path — one that led him to travel through Italy for three months to study refugee integration firsthand. Tassi, who was born in Italy and moved to the United States in third grade, traveled widely in high school and spent time living with host families in several countries. Those experiences sparked a passion for learning about and understanding cultures.

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Political scientist’s new book on liberalism garners significant media attention

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

A new book by a Notre Dame political science professor has sparked a fire in the public sphere, garnering significant discussion in major media outlets over his arguments about liberalism and modern society. In Why Liberalism Failed, Patrick Deneen — the David A. Potenziani Memorial Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies — argues that liberalism is built on a foundation of contradictions. 

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English professor wins Lannan Foundation fellowship in honor of his fiction writing

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Roy Scranton, an assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of English, has won a fellowship from the Lannan Foundation in recognition of his fiction writing. Since 1989, the foundation has given literary awards and fellowships to both established and emerging writers “of distinctive literary merit who demonstrate potential for continued outstanding work.”

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How a philosophy major developed a passion for researching women’s rights in Latin America 

Author: Teagan Dillon

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, and General News

One week into her senior year, Natasha Reifenberg headed to an academic health conference in El Salvador, presenting a policy brief based in research she had been involved in for the last two years. An opportunity usually reserved for distinguished academics, the trip was just one of many highlights in an outstanding undergraduate career that includes internships at the Global Fund for Women and United Nations Development Program and independent research opportunities centered around women’s issues and rights. Reifenberg attributes her accomplishments to her education in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters — particularly her philosophy major.

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New quantitative psychologist adds expertise in data mining to Notre Dame faculty

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

For Ross Jacobucci, quantitative psychology is a chance to invent, to improvise — and to create new tools to answer complex questions. As a new assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, he wants his students to see that side of it, too. Jacobucci, who joined Arts and Letters in the fall after receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California, specializes in structural equation modeling and data mining.

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Notre Dame economist’s research will help Department of Energy predict future oil demand

Author: Emily McConville

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

The U.S. government has a good idea of where oil prices are headed and why, but the demand side is less clear. So the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), a part of the Department of Energy that collects and distributes data on energy and the economy, recruited Notre Dame economist Christiane Baumeister to develop an indicator for future energy demand. With a two-year, $120,000 grant, she’ll collect data on possible determinants of oil demand and create models to figure out which of those factors actually determine future demand. Having that information, she said, tells us about more than just oil. 

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Political science department adds four international relations experts to faculty

Author: Katie Boruff

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science has added four new faculty members, bolstering its expertise in international relations issues. The new faculty — Eugene Gholz, Joseph Parent, Rosemary Kelanic, and Jazmin Sierra — join an elite group of academics advancing research and teaching in a vibrant department. “International relations remains one of the most important areas of political science with direct relevance to the challenges of peace, prosperity, and trust among nations,” said Luis Ricardo Fraga, acting chair of the department. “Understanding these challenges in today’s ever-changing and complex world of politics requires analyses that are nuanced, evidence-driven, and grounded in the development of new theory.”

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Music professor John Liberatore to write composition for Harvard’s Fromm Music Foundation

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Arts

John Liberatore is captivated by the glass harmonica, an archaic 18th-century instrument invented by Benjamin Franklin. And he is fascinated by how the latest technological innovations are changing music composition and performance. The juxtaposition of the two is at the heart of his next composition — titled “In White Spaces” — which has been commissioned by the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard University. He is one of just 12 composers to receive the prestigious commission this year.

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