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Notre Dame Receives USAID Grant to Undertake Global Development Research on Three Continents

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Notre Dame seal

Twelve University of Notre Dame students, including eight from the College of Arts and Letters, have been selected by the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID’s) brand-new Research and Innovation Fellowship Program. They will travel to Brazil, Colombia, India, and South Africa to research global development challenges and create innovative solutions to address these issues.

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Graduate Students Show How Popular Movies Influence Political Views

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Research

Todd Adkins

Can mainstream movies affect our political views? Two Ph.D. candidates in Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science say the answer is yes. Todd Adkins and Jeremy Castle published the results of their research in an article in Social Science Quarterly, titled “Moving Pictures? Experimental Evidence of Cinematic Influence on Political Attitudes.”

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ND Expert: Media Must Resist Islamophobia in Wake of Chapel Hill Murders

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Ebrahim Moosa

Sensational reporting and commentary must be avoided in the wake of the recent murders of three Muslim college students in North Carolina, according to Ebrahim Moosa, professor of Islamic studies in the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and the Department of History.

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Video: Fighting to Create Economic Opportunity

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

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A degree from a reputable community college has the potential to lift people out of poverty, but 60 percent of community college students drop out before they graduate. The research of economists Jim Sullivan and William Evans at Notre Dame’s Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities found that most of these students drop out as a result of non-academic obstacles. Sullivan and Evans are attempting to increase retention rates through the program Stay the Course.

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New Psychology Hire Focuses on Anxiety and Depression

Author: Mike Danahey

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Lira Yoon

Associate Professor Lira Yoon has brought her expertise in social anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder to the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Psychology, where she plans to establish an experimental psychopathology lab that uses multiple methods to better understand the interface between cognition and emotion.

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Two Notre Dame Psychologists Awarded NSF CAREER Grants

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Two psychologists in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters—Associate Professor Ying “Alison” Cheng and Assistant Professor Jill Lany—received Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2014.
These awards, which include five years of support to the faculty members, add to the recent success of the Department of Psychology.

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New Notre Dame Study Examines Prenatal Investments, Breastfeeding, and Birth Order

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Kasey Buckles

Many mothers can relate to the experience of having hundreds of pictures of their first-born child, but far fewer of their younger children. A new study by University of Notre Dame economist Kasey Buckles finds that those younger children often get less attention in other ways as well.

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Video: Fighting for Those Touched by Cancer

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Tom Merluzzi

One of out every three people receiving treatment for cancer also struggles with anxiety and clinical depression. Even when cancer patients survive the disease, they suffer from these psychological conditions at twice the rate of the general population. Tom Merluzzi, professor of psychology and director of the Notre Dame Laboratory for Psycho-Oncology Research, is working to reduce that rate.

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Video: Political Scientist on Latino Civic Engagement in America

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Luis Fraga

“I want to do research that provides some hints to both major political parties as to how they might be able to make effective appeals to Latino communities, and through Latino communities, to many other communities across the United States,” said Luis Fraga, the Arthur Foundation Endowed Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership and professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame.

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New Hires Bring Expertise in Latino Politics and American Political Institutions

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Luis Fraga

The latest faculty hires in Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science bring expertise in the fields of Latino and American politics. Luis Ricardo Fraga, a heralded scholar and pioneer in the study of Latino politics, has been named the Arthur Foundation Endowed Professor of Transformative Latino Leadership in the Institute of Latino Studies (ILS) and a professor in the Department of Political Science. Gary E. Hollibaugh, Jr., whose research focuses on American political institutions, joined the department this year as an assistant professor.

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Reilly Center to Train STEM Ph.D. Students in Social Responsibilities

Author: Jessica Baron

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

Don Howard

A new NSF-funded program in the Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values is encouraging STEM Ph.D. students to go beyond standard research ethics training and look at their research in terms of its social relevance. The people behind the project are Don Howard, Reilly fellow and former director of the center, Melinda Gormley, assistant director for research of the center, and Mark Bourgeois, a postdoc hired to implement the program. Students in this program will learn about the broad social and political context of scientific work as well as its many complex, often nonobvious, connections with society.

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Breaking New Ground in the Digital Humanities

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Matthew Wilkens

Matthew Wilkens, an assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of English, recently won a prestigious fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) for his groundbreaking digital humanities research. In naming Wilkens one of seven scholars to receive its 2014 Digital Innovation Fellowship, ACLS described his Literary Geography at Scale as “one of the largest humanities text-mining projects to date and the first truly large-scale study of 20th- and 21st-century literature.”

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Two New Hires Bring Expertise in Chinese History

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

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Notre Dame’s Department of History has significantly broadened and deepened its coverage of China with the appointments of Elisabeth Köll and Liang Cai, two scholars “who are doing extraordinarily exciting and complementary work,” said Madden-Hennebry Professor of History Patrick Griffin, chair of the department. “These two historians enjoy established reputations in their subfields,” Griffin said. “They are also committed to teaching, and they will fit in beautifully to a department that prides itself on its scholarly and teaching prowess.”

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College of Arts and Letters Announces New Computing and Digital Technologies Minor

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Faculty News

Charles Crowell

The College of Arts and Letters will launch an interdisciplinary minor in Computing and Digital Technologies (CDT) starting in the fall of 2015. The CDT minor will offer a foundation for Arts and Letters students interested in all facets of technology—from technology consulting and cyber security to the digital arts and humanities. “One of the most exciting aspects of this program is that it was designed from the beginning with input from Arts and Letters alumni who are now leaders in the technology industry,” said Charles Crowell, associate professor of psychology and director of the program.

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Notre Dame Professor’s New Work Explores Morality and Tradition in African Christian Theology

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Paulinus Ikechukwu Odozor

The Catholic Church in Africa is growing at an annual rate of over 3 percent. Given the largely Eurocentric nature of moral theology in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, what will it take to invest the theological community in the history and moral challenges of the Church in other parts of the world, especially Africa? What is to be gained for the whole Church when this happens in a deep and lasting way? These are some of the questions Notre Dame Associate Professor Paulinus Ikechukwu Odozor, C.S.Sp., explores in his latest work, Morality Truly Christian, Truly African: Foundational, Methodological, and Theological Considerations.

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Notre Dame’s Reilly Center Releases 2015 List of Emerging Ethical Dilemmas and Policy Issues in Science and Technology

Author: Jessica Baron

Categories: General News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

Google Glass

The John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values at the University of Notre Dame has released its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology for 2015. The Reilly Center explores conceptual, ethical, and policy issues where science and technology intersect with society from different disciplinary perspectives. Its goal is to promote the advancement of science and technology for the common good.

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Economics Graduate Students Attend Nobel Laureate Meeting

Author: Daniel Sehlhorst

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, and Internationalism

Kevin Rinz

Situated on the shores of beautiful Lake Constance in Germany, the Lindau Nobel Laureate meetings are a unique opportunity for young scholars to engage in dialogue with Nobel Prize winners in their field. Robert Lester and Kevin Rinz, two Notre Dame Ph.D. candidates in economics, were among the 460 graduate students from more than 80 countries selected to attend the Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences in August. The four-day conference included numerous discussions, lectures, and master classes with 18 Nobel laureates in economics.

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Video: Literature Professor John Sitter Wins 2014 Sheedy Award

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Faculty News

John Sitter

John Sitter, the Mary Lee Duda Professor of Literature in the University of Notre Dame’s Department of English, was awarded the 2014 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award. The highest teaching honor in the University’s College of Arts and Letters, the Sheedy award was founded in 1970 in honor of Rev. Charles E. Sheedy, C.S.C., who served as dean of the College from 1951–69. 2013 Sheedy Award winner Julia Douthwaite, professor of French and Francophone studies, introduced Sitter at the December 2 awards ceremony.

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The Paradox of Generosity

Author: Carol C. Bradley

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Christian Smith hp crop

The notion of generosity, and the ways in which we deal generously—or not—with our friends, family and communities—is the heart of the book, The Paradox of Generosity by Christian Smith and Hilary Davidson, which is based on empirical data collected during five years of research as part of the Science of Generosity Initiative. The research draws on a survey of 2,000 Americans, 60 in-depth interviews with individuals across 12 states, and more than 1,000 photographs and other visual materials. The conclusion Christian Smith, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology, draws is that there’s a direct correlation with happiness and generosity. “The more generous Americans are, the more happiness, health and purpose in life they enjoy,” he says.

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Notre Dame to Renovate Hesburgh Library

Author: Tara O'Leary

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Faculty News

library hp crop

In the wake of the 50th anniversary of the University of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Library, the University will begin an interior renovation of the iconic building later this month. Named in honor of President Emeritus Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., the Hesburgh Library is the flagship for Notre Dame’s library system, collectively called the Hesburgh Libraries. Grand in both vision and scale, the building is more than 440,000 square feet, stands 14 stories tall, and is believed to have been the largest collegiate library of its day.

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Psychology Major Publishes Senior Thesis in Academic Journal

Author: Emily McConville

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Alumni

Shane Kelly '14

Because Shane Kelly ’14 began his undergraduate education intending to go to graduate school in psychology, he knew he should get involved in research at Notre Dame as soon as possible. So when Associate Professor James Brockmole offered him a research assistant position in his Visual Cognition Lab, Kelly jumped at the opportunity. “It turned out to be a great decision and I enjoyed cognitive psychology and working in the Visual Cognition Lab immediately,” Kelly said.

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Alex Coccia Named Rhodes Scholar

Alex Coccia

Alex Coccia, a 2014 University of Notre Dame graduate, has been selected to the American Rhodes Scholar Class of 2015. A Columbus, Ohio native, Coccia was selected from a pool of 877 candidates who had been nominated by their colleges and universities. He is Notre Dame’s 15th Rhodes Scholar and first since 2002. This year’s 32 Rhodes Scholars will commence their studies at Oxford in October 2015.

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Four College of Arts and Letters Graduate Students Receive NSF Fellowships

Author: Jonathan Warren

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Eleven Notre Dame graduate students—including four from the University’s College of Arts and Letters—have been awarded graduate research fellowships from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the 2014-15 academic year. Katie Condit, Danielle Fulmer, and Nicole Perez from the Department of Sociology and Charlotte Cunningham from the Department of Psychology were among this year’s winners.

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Nicole Sganga: Going Global in Search of Stories

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Internationalism

Nicole Sganga

Senior Nicole Sganga spent part of summer 2014 traveling in Myanmar and reporting with New York Times journalist Nicholas Kristof after winning the “Win a Trip with Nick” contest. While in Myanmar, she wrote and video-d her way through encounters with Rohingya Muslims living under protracted persecution in internment camps. What you might not know is what Sganga learned—and where she hopes her adventures as a global citizen will take her next.

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Notre Dame's Graduate School and Reilly Center Win NSF Grant to Evaluate Ethical Leadership Programs

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Laura Carlson

The University of Notre Dame’s Graduate School and John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values have won a National Science Foundation grant in the amount of $410,340 for a project that will study what training content and methods most successfully help STEM students become ethical leaders. “The literature tells us that ethical leaders are role models to their peers, colleagues, mentees, and students,” says Principal Investigator Laura Carlson, professor of psychology and vice president, associate provost, and dean of the Graduate School.

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Medieval History Graduate Student Awarded Rome Prize

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Catholicism

Rome skyline

David Morris, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of History, has been awarded a prestigious Samuel H. Kress Rome Prize fellowship in medieval studies by the American Academy in Rome for the 2014-15 academic year. Established in 1896, the Rome Prize is awarded annually to approximately 30 emerging artists and scholars who represent the “highest standard of excellence in the arts and humanities.”

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Video: Meet Irish Major Rae Moors

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Rae Moors, Irish language and literature major

“I tell everyone that I meet that they should take an Irish language course,” said Rae Moors, a senior Irish language and literature major. In the first program of its kind in North America, Notre Dame Irish majors learn the indigenous language of Ireland and engage with a wide range of literature, from medieval sagas to contemporary poetry and prose. “There are so many angles you can take while studying Ireland,” said Moors.

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Political Scientist Victoria Hui to Testify Before Congressional Executive Commission on China

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Victoria Hui

Victoria Hui, an associate professor of political science and faculty fellow of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies at the University of Notre Dame, will testify Thursday, November 20, before a Congressional Executive Commission on China hearing titled “The Future of Democracy in Hong Kong.” The hearing will examine China’s commitments to Hong Kong and the international community in light of recent pro-democracy protests. It will assess whether an increasingly polarized Hong Kong will be able to find a mutually acceptable plan for electoral reform and how the protests taking will place will continue to shape that debate. It also will focus on what the protests mean for the future of human rights and democracy in Hong Kong and China.

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