Latest News

Latest News » Research

In new study, professor and undergraduate find economic benefits of admitting refugees outweigh costs

Author: Patrick Gibbons

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

Although working-age adult refugees who enter the United States often initially rely on public assistance programs, a study by researchers at the University of Notre Dame indicates that the long-term economic benefit of admitting refugees outweighs the initial costs. The study, published as a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper this week, was conducted by William Evans, Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Economics, and Daniel Fitzgerald, undergraduate research assistant at Notre Dame’s Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities. 

Read More

Notre Dame theologian and Holy Cross priest to address U.S. bishops on refugees and migration

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Rev. Daniel Groody, C.S.C., associate professor of theology, will address the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops on the theology of migration during the bishops’ annual Spring General Assembly, June 14-15, in Indianapolis. Groody’s talk, “Passing Over: Migration, Theology and the Eucharist,” draws on his research around the world mapping the many sides of the current conversation on migration.

Read More

Political scientist Alan Dowty receives lifetime achievement award from Association for Israel Studies

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

The Association for Israel Studies has recognized Alan Dowty, a professor emeritus in Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science, with an AIS-Israel Institute Lifetime Achievement Award for his “lasting and path-breaking contributions” that have significantly shaped the field of Israel studies. Dowty has published seven books and more than 130 articles on the Middle East, U.S. foreign policy, and international relations. A revised and expanded fourth edition of his acclaimed book Israel/Palestine will be published in October.

Read More

FTT faculty lead effort to restore a piece of 20th-century popular culture

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Arts, Faculty News, General News, and Research

One of the most innovative and new pieces of popular culture emerged in 1914 when Winsor McCay, a famous cartoonist and vaudeville performer, incorporated an animated cartoon called Gertie into his act. Despite its popularity at the time, the original film and the paper drawings for it have all but been forgotten over the past 100 years. But now, faculty members in Notre Dame's Department of Film, Television, and Theatre are working to change that by collaborating internationally to restore the film and to research the history surrounding its cultural impact.

Read More

History professor receives two major honors from Medieval Academy of America

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

John Van Engen, the Andrew V. Tackes Professor of Medieval History, received two significant honors from the Medieval Academy of America at its annual meeting in Toronto last month. A member of Notre Dame’s Department of History since 1977, Van Engen received the association’s Robert L. Kindrick-CARA Award for Outstanding Service to Medieval Studies and was elected president of the Fellows of the Medieval Academy of America, a group formed more than 90 years ago to promote the study of the Middle Ages and recognize scholars around the world who make important contributions to the field.

Read More

Video: Class of 2017 reflects on how the liberal arts shaped their lives — and their futures

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

Congratulations to the Class of 2017! This video, screened at the Arts and Letters Diploma Ceremony, features several seniors reflecting on their time at Notre Dame and in the College of Arts and Letters. "Coming to Notre Dame has instilled in me a sense of possibility to do great things with those gifts that I've acquired here — knowledge, skills, friends, community — and bringing that to the world," said political science major Olivia Till, who will join Atlantic Media's National Journal as a research fellow. "And I'm excited for that journey."

Read More

Record 30 Arts and Letters students and alumni receive Fulbright Awards for 2017-2018

A record 30 College of Arts and Letters students and alumni have been awarded grants by the Fulbright U.S. Student Program to study abroad in 2017-18. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program, offering students grants to conduct research, study and teach abroad. 

Read More

Theology Ph.D. candidate Craig Iffland wins Newcombe Fellowship

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Graduate Students, National Fellowships, and Research

Craig Iffland, a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Theology, has been named a 2017 recipient of the Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. He is one of only 21 scholars from across the country to receive the award, the nation’s largest and most prestigious for Ph.D. candidates in the humanities and social sciences who are addressing questions of ethical and religious values

Read More

Twenty-three Arts and Letters seniors receive national and international scholarships and fellowships

Commencement

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program, the National Science Foundation, the Rhodes Trust, and other organizations have awarded scholarships and fellowships to 23 members of the College of Arts and Letters’ Class of 2017.

Read More

Four Arts and Letters students win Undergraduate Library Research Awards

Author: Tara O'Leary

Categories: General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

Four undergraduate students in Notre Dame's College of Arts and Letters received Undergraduate Library Research Awards during the 10th annual Undergraduate Scholars Conference on Friday, May 5. The award honors individuals who conduct original research and demonstrate exemplary skills through their broad use of library resources, collections, and services for their scholarly and creative works.

Read More

PLS and theology professor wins award for research on influential Catholic thinker

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

An examination of one of the 20th century’s most important Catholic theologians has garnered a significant honor for Jennifer Newsome Martin, an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies. She is one of 10 people worldwide to receive the 2017 Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise, presented by the University of Heidelberg’s Forschungszentrum für Internationale und Interdisziplinäre Theologie for outstanding doctoral or first post-doctoral works in the area of God and spirituality.

Read More

How focusing on parent-child relationships can prevent child maltreatment

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Kristin Valentino’s research on evaluating the effectiveness of a brief relational intervention for maltreated preschool-aged children and their mothers is featured in a special section of Child Development. In order to help children facing maltreatment, researchers and clinicians first needed to address the heart of the problem. The relationship between the parent and child is key, she argues.

Read More

Professor wins prestigious international design award

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Arts, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Brian Edlefson, a Notre Dame assistant professor of visual communication design, has won a prestigious international award for his design work showing how people can adjust their office furniture to shape their work environments. Edlefson won an iF Design Award for user adjustment information he created for furniture maker Herman Miller. Edelfson’s design was selected by a 58-member jury of the iF International Forum Design in Hannover, Germany, from more than 5,500 entries submitted from 59 countries.

Read More

In new book, anthropology chair details why creativity is the key to human exceptionalism

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Agustín Fuentes finds the four predominant arguments that seek to explain human evolution and human nature to be compelling but extremely simplified. Years of research and an emphasis on cross-disciplinary conversations has instead led him to a more complete story of human evolution. Creativity and collaboration, he argues in The Creative Spark, are the most important explanations for why we are the way we are.

Read More

Notre Dame political science professor wins Carnegie Fellowship to study political implications of secularism

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

David Campbell, the Packey J. Dee Professor of American Democracy at the University of Notre Dame, has been selected as an Andrew Carnegie Fellow for his creative thinking and innovative research on the rise of secularism in the United States and its political implications. Campbell, chair of the Department of Political Science, will use the prestigious grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, announced Wednesday, to study the growing number of people in America who identify as nonreligious and the political force they could become.

Read More

Notre Dame philosopher Alvin Plantinga awarded 2017 Templeton Prize

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Alvin Plantinga, the John A. O’Brien Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame, was named the 2017 Templeton Prize Laureate on Tuesday (April 25) by the John Templeton Foundation. Over his 50 years of research in philosophy of religion, epistemology and metaphysics, Plantinga has advanced landmark arguments for the existence of God, returning the questions of religious belief to the common discourse of academic philosophy.

Read More

Majority of persecuted Christian communities build resilience through adaptive strategies, study finds

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

The collaborative global research project, Under Caesar's Sword, is co-directed by political scientist Daniel Philpott. “In Response to Persecution,” a report on the UCS project’s findings, was launched April 20 in a day-long symposium at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Read More

MFA students take top prize in ND App Challenge

Author: Lenette Votava

Categories: Arts, General News, Graduate Students, and Research

The first Notre Dame App Challenge concluded with presentations by each of the four final teams to the judging committee and the public in Mendoza’s Jordan Auditorium on campus. South Bend City Connect, an app aimed at reducing the additional cost of poverty for South Bend residents, took the top prize of $7,500. The idea for the app was created by graduate students Miriam Moore and Robbin Forsyth, who are both pursuing Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in design.

Read More

Jessica Collett, associate professor of sociology, to receive 2017 Sheedy Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Jessica Collett, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology, has been chosen to receive the 2017 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award. The highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters, the Sheedy Award was created in 1970 to honor Rev. Charles E. Sheedy, C.S.C., who served as dean of Arts and Letters from 1951 to 1969. Collett will accept the award at a reception in her honor in December.

Read More

Four Arts and Letters faculty members win ACLS fellowships

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Four faculty members in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have been awarded 2017 fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. The pre-eminent representative of American scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, the ACLS offers up to a year of funding for in-depth exploration of a topic that expands the understanding of the human experience. Three historians — Mariana Candido, Deborah Tor, and Evan Ragland — were among the 71 ACLS fellows selected from a pool of nearly 1,200 applicants. Katherine Brading, a professor of philosophy, is a member of one of nine teams to win a collaborative research fellowship.

Read More

Nine Arts and Letters students and alumni win NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Awards and honorable mentions

Author: Samantha Lee

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, National Fellowships, Research, and Undergraduate News

The NSF GRFP recognizes and supports outstanding graduate and graduating undergraduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and social science disciplines who are pursuing research-based degrees.

Read More

Theology and peace studies professor wins Luce Fellowship for research on sub-Saharan Africa

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Fr. Emmanuel Katongole, a Notre Dame associate professor of theology and peace studies, will spend a year studying three predominant forms of violence in sub-Saharan Africa after being named a Henry Luce III Fellow in Theology for 2017–2018, one of six scholars selected from members of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada. Katongole will begin a yearlong study in January aimed at looking at ethnic, religious, and ecological violence in African countries south of the Sahara.

Read More

Video: Heather Hyde Minor on the enduring relevance of art history

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Arts, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Notre Dame associate professor Heather Hyde Minor specializes in the history of European art and architecture from 1600 to 1800. Her current research project examines the life of Johann Joachim Winckelmann, an 18th-century German art historian and archaeologist whom many consider to be the founder of the modern discipline of art history.

Read More

College of Arts and Letters to launch new certificate program in international security studies

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

The College of Arts and Letters and the Notre Dame International Security Center (NDISC) will launch a new certificate program in international security studies in fall 2017. Open to political science majors, the program will offer rigorous training for students interested in exploring career opportunities in international security and foreign policy. To earn the certificate, students must take the U.S. National Security Policy gateway course and two relevant electives, finish a two-semester senior thesis research project, complete an approved internship in the world of international security policy, and participate in NDISC’s seminar series and other events.

Read More

Arts and Letters associate dean named chair of the International Shakespeare Association

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Arts, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Peter Holland, the College of Arts and Letters’ associate dean for the arts and the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies, has been named chair of the International Shakespeare Association. Holland, a professor in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre, was selected by the association’s executive committee from candidates nominated worldwide for the prestigious position. The association, based in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, the birthplace of Shakespeare, seeks to further the study of the playwright’s life and to connect Shakespeareans and Shakespeare societies around the world.

 

Read More

In fiction and nonfiction, new English professor tells war stories — and challenges war myths

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Roy Scranton, who joined the Notre Dame faculty in fall 2016, doesn't write about war the way most Americans do. In his acclaimed debut novel War Porn and in his nonfiction writing in Rolling StoneThe New York Times, and the LA Review of Books, the Iraq War veteran pushes back against what he calls "the trauma hero" — the trope of making the American soldier the victim of American military aggresion. 

Read More

Sociology graduate students’ research shows broad range, from the local to the international

Author: Renee Peggs

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

Whether their research explores community-led initiatives, national trends, or international issues, Ph.D. students in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology produce outstanding research that is leading to grants, fellowships, and job offers. “Our students benefit from the fact that our faculty is unusually large and strong and covers almost the entire range of sociology,” said Lyn Spillman, director of graduate studies. “They enjoy not only our excellent faculty/student ratios but also the wide range of expertise we offer. The result is that our students produce new knowledge across the entire disciplinary range.”

Read More

Three Arts and Letters majors named to prestigious Yenching Scholars program

A trio of Notre Dame students and alumni have been named Yenching Scholars, a globally competitive award that provides a full scholarship and stipend to pursue an interdisciplinary master’s degree at China’s top university. Teresa Kennedy ’16, an anthropology and peace studies major from Wilbraham, Massachusetts; senior Jenny Ng, a political science major from Sai Kung, Hong Kong; and Dominic Romeo ’14, a political science and Chinese major from Turlock, California, were named to the third cohort entering the Yenching Academy, based at Peking University in Beijing.

Read More