Latest News

In new book, Arts and Letters dean reveals Jesuits’ impact on global history

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Alumni, Catholicism, and Faculty News

In his new book, American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global (Princeton University Press), McGreevy uses individual religious experiences and others as a gateway to a larger narrative. The book traces how the religious order grew from 600 men in 1814 to roughly 17,000 men a century later. McGreevy argues that their odyssey of expulsion (by European nationalists worried about excessive Jesuit loyalty to the papacy) and reconstruction (as Jesuits launched a counterculture centered around parishes, schools, and universities) powerfully shaped modern history.

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A conversation with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: General News

United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg reads from a pocket copy of the United States Constitution during a conversation with U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Ann Claire Williams

In a reflective, frank, and often wryly humorous conversation with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Monday night (Sept. 12) at the University of Notre Dame’s Purcell Pavilion at the Joyce Center, the justice offered insights into her upbringing, judicial philosophy and hopes for the future of the court.

U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Ann Claire Williams, a Notre Dame alumna and Trustee, asked Ginsburg a series of questions on a wide range of issues.

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New FTT assistant professor brings humanistic focus to study of video games

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Matthew Payne will join Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT) as an assistant professor this fall, bringing research and teaching interests that range from the rapidly evolving field of video games and interactive entertainment to convergent media, new media literacy, media representations of war, and ethnographic audience research. His book, Playing War: Military Video Games After 9/11, examines how games like the Call of Duty and Battlefield series “transform international strife into interactive fun."

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Video: Joshua Lund, associate professor of Spanish, on the poetics of paramilitarism

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

“When we think about paramilitarism, we tend to think about a rather contemporary history around counterinsurgency warfare, but that moment is actually linked to a much longer history that goes back to the very formation of modern American states,” said Joshua Lund, associate professor of Spanish at the University of Notre Dame. Lund studies Latin American film, literature, and cultural politics. His published works include two books, The Mestizo State (2012) and The Impure Imagination (2006), a co-edited volume of scholarship on Gilberto Freyre, and essays on a range of cultural topics.

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Annual research funding at Notre Dame tops $128 million

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Professor Amy Hixon works with an undergraduate researcher in her Stinson-Remick Lab, Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental and Earth Studies

The University of Notre Dame has received $128 million in research funding for fiscal year 2016 — the second highest in its history. In fiscal year 2015, the University’s research funding was its highest of all time, reaching $133 million.

“The research, scholarship and creativity of Notre Dame faculty continues to make a difference in multiple ways across our country and around the world,” said Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., the University’s president. “The growth in external funding is a tangible testimony to the importance of their work.”

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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg to speak at Notre Dame

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

A conversation with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will take place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 12 (Monday) at the University of Notre Dame’s Purcell Pavilion at the Joyce Center, University President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., announced Tuesday (Aug. 30).

An associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court since 1993, Ginsburg will engage in a dialogue on a wide range of issues with U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Ann Claire Williams, a Notre Dame alumna and Trustee.

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Notre Dame announces collaboration with AT&T for online master’s degree in data science

Author: Sue Lister

Categories: Graduate Students and General News

University of Notre Dame

With a growing need for skilled data scientists, the University of Notre Dame, in collaboration with AT&T, has announced its new online master of science degree with a specialization in data science. Offered by the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics, with the collaboration of the Department of Psychology, the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, and the Mendoza College of Business, this degree program will prepare graduates for careers as data scientists in a wide range of industry fields fields including management, marketing, information technology, government policy, health care, finance, education and scientific research.

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Video: Why Mallory Brown ’06 hires Arts and Letters majors at her global consulting firm

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Internationalism

A political science major and a German minor in the College of Arts and Letters, Mallory Brown has spent her entire career with Egon Zehnder, a global management consulting and executive search firm, and is now based in its Berlin office. When hiring entry-level researchers, Brown said that she looks for students with a broad educational background. “I'm targeting Arts and Letters majors because I know they can write well, and they've also had exposure to a broad number of topics,” Brown said. “We deal with every industry, every function, and every geography, so the broader the type of candidate and the type of student we can interview, the better."

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Video: John Phillips ’66, U.S. ambassador to Italy, on the many benefits of the liberal arts

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Internationalism

“A liberal arts education gives you really good foundation,” said John Phillips ’66, a College of Arts and Letters alumnus who majored in government and international studies. President Barack Obama appointed him ambassador to Italy in 2013. Phillips is the president’s personal representative in Italy and is responsible for managing a wide range of diplomatic issues, including military, commerce, immigration, and foreign policy matters.

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In Fifty Years with Father Hesburgh, Schmuhl paints warm portrait of former president

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C., president of the University of Notre Dame from 1952 to 1987, was one of the nation’s most influential figures in higher education and national affairs and a well-known figure on campus. In the 1960s, a student named Robert Schmuhl, covering what Father Hesburgh called “the student revolution” for the Associated Press, began what would be a lifelong relationship with the president. Schmuhl, now the Walter H. Annenberg-Edmund P. Joyce Chair in American Studies and Journalism at Notre Dame, is the author of Fifty Years with Father Hesburgh: On and Off the Record, released Aug. 25 by University of Notre Dame Press.

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Anthropologist wins ACLS fellowship to digitally analyze Brazilian indigenous language

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

When the Wauja people tell a story about their history and culture, the words they choose convey a deep meaning about the indigenous Brazilian tribe’s interconnectedness to its landscape. Christopher Ball wants to delve into that relationship between language and place. Funded by an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship, the assistant professor of anthropology is exploring how the Wauja people use words to create an identity that ties their culture to a nearby river and chronicling that meaning for future generations.

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Rock musician, producer Todd Rundgren to serve as artist-in-residence

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News and Arts

Singer, songwriter and producer Todd Rundgren will serve as an artist-in-residence for the Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT) at the University of Notre Dame from Sept. 22 to Oct. 1. During his residency, Rundgren will teach several classes, work with students and teachers in the South Bend/Mishawaka community, perform with student bands in a concert Oct. 1 at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, organize an on-campus collection of used musical instruments for national redistribution to music students in need and, in conjunction with his Spirit of Harmony Foundation, present an award to Notre Dame alumnus Bill Hurd.

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English professor wins ACLS fellowship to study medieval marginalia

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton studies medieval texts, many of them on sheepskins and fragile after hundreds of years in conditions not always suited for preservation. The Notre Dame Professor of English studies the margins of these medieval texts, which contain thoughts scrawled by some of the brightest minds of the time. They are a layer of interaction and understanding that Kerby-Fulton will spend the next year studying, supported by a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. 

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Scholar of Portuguese language, Brazilian culture joins Arts and Letters faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Marcio Bahia is coming to Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures with his eyes focused squarely on Brazil. A scholar of Brazilian culture and language, Bahia will join the College of Arts and Letters faculty this fall with a focus on accelerating the growth of the Portuguese program.

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Arts and Letters alumnus Patrick Vassel plays pivotal role in success of Hamilton

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Arts

Political science major Patrick Vassel '07 didn’t come to Notre Dame dreaming of a career on Broadway. But a path that began with acting and directing in shows on campus has led him to New York's biggest stage. He's now associate director of Hamilton, the blockbuster musical that's won Tony Awards, a Grammy, and the Pulitzer Prize. Vassel has been a key figure in the show's development, working with actors and technicians night in and night out.

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LEO study on homelessness prevention published in Science

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

A study of the Homelessness Prevention Call Center in Chicago by the Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities found that such hotlines have a considerable effect on people facing homelessness, and that emergency financial assistance successfully prevents homelessness — if funding is available. The study, published in the Aug. 12 edition of Science, examines the impact of financial assistance for 4,500 individuals and families who called the HPCC between 2010 and 2012.

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Small acts of great love: Junior helps abandoned children of China

Author: Carrie Gates and Todd Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, and Internationalism

Arts and Letter junior Emily Vincent discovered Chunmiao Little Flower on a service trip during high school in 2013. There, she learned the extent of China’s issue with orphaned and abandoned children. There are an estimated 600,000 abandoned children in China—98 percent of whom have disabilities. That first experience at Chunmiao Little Flower set the course for Vincent’s future—and, ultimately, led her to choose Notre Dame, inspired by the University’s devotion to human solidarity and concern for the common good.

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Sustainability students cross disciplinary boundaries to address real-world issues

Author: Tessa Bangs

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Internationalism

Notre Dame's sustainability program, open to all majors, seeks to inspire students to cultivate practices and ways of living that preserve natural resources for future generations. The minor is housed in the College of Science, but it has proven to be an ideal way for Arts and Letters students to connect their interest in science with their passion for the humanities.

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