Our Experts in the News

Archive

  1. Groundbreaking ceremony held for Foundry Field in South Bend

    “Man, it feels great,” said Clinton Carlson, an associate professor at the University of Notre Dame. “The best part about it is seeing the community come out. The Boys & Girls Club were here yesterday. They got to sign posters that the kids made of these men that played on the Foundry Giants. We had Riley High School here yesterday helping paint all the murals and everything. And then to have family members — the Poindexters were here. A family that didn’t know their grandpa played baseball and he’s a key member of our community. He contributed by his labor at Studebaker and as a longtime sheriff’s deputy for our community.”

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  2. Trump is accused in court of rape. Will it matter in 2024?

    “At this point, the American people have a pretty good sense of Donald Trump’s character, so it is unlikely that the Carroll trial will change many voters’ minds,” said Christina Wolbrecht, a political science professor at the University of Notre Dame who studies politics and gender.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  3. Tucker Carlson Reveals He Was 'Excited' by Obama's Presidency

    Robert Schmuhl, a professor emeritus in American studies and journalism at the University of Notre Dame, told Newsweek that for "Tucker Carlson to talk about race as he did in his recent speech just pours gasoline on a fire he started."

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  4. Writers’ strike set to hit TV, movies hard: What you need to know

    “The extent to which everything is moving over to streaming and with cord cutting, this is not just for the life of the next three years of this next contract, but almost generations-worth of labor in Hollywood is going to be affected by what happens with this deal,” said Christine Becker, an associate professor in University of Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television and Theatre.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  5. Kids Need to Know Their Math Facts. What Schools Can Do to Help

    Whether students are building their fact fluency with flashcards, worksheets, dice games, or other common tools, there’s a tendency to try to do too much at once, cautions Nicole McNeil, a professor of psychology and the director of lab on cognition, learning, and development at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  6. The conservative campaign to rewrite child labor laws

    “The reason these rather unpopular policies succeed is because they come in under the radar screen,” said David Campbell, professor of American democracy at the University of Notre Dame. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  7. Notre Dame professor plans another summer dig for Collier Lodge site in Kouts By Shelley Jones

    The public is invited to an authentic Midwestern archaeological dig at the old Collier Lodge on the banks of the Kankakee River in Kouts this June. The Kankakee Valley Historical Society will again partner with the University of Notre Dame to conduct the dig at what is considered to be one of the most significant archaeological sites in Northwest Indiana. From 2002 to 2012 Notre Dame Professor of Anthropology Mark Schurr led yearly digs. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  8. Joe Biden's Approval Rating Among Independents Is Alarming for Democrats

    Independents were also crucial in deciding the outcome of the 2022 midterm elections, according to the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy at the University of Notre Dame. Matthew Hall, director of the Rooney Center, pointed to partisan loyalty in a statement about independents' role in the midterms, saying: "In today's highly polarized environment, voters are very loyal to their preferred political party. As a result, elections are almost entirely determined by voter turnout and independent voters."

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  9. The surprising science of climate protests

    One study on the first Earth Day, on 22 April 1970, found a long-term impact on air quality in areas that had good weather that day – which researchers used as an estimate for participation in activities. "Our approach was to use weather to essentially mimic an experiment," says Daniel Hungerman

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  10. As Trump pleads not guilty, Catholic experts weigh in on impact of indictment on 2024 campaign

    Robert Schmuhl, professor emeritus of American studies at the University of Notre Dame who critically observes the modern American presidency, said that “the word ‘unprecedented’ is becoming the most common word associated with Donald Trump and his political career.”

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  11. Notre Dame student-written musical 'My Heart Says Go' takes on new life at Civic

    Most musical theater smash hits don't get their start in South Bend, but University of Notre Dame musical theater professor and director Matt Hawkins says that's about to change with "My Heart Says Go."

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  12. Learn Your Stripes: Studying Thom Browne at Notre Dame

    “When you’re here, you feel that you’re in such a safe, enclosed environment,” says the designer and CFDA Chairman Thom Browne over a bowl of honey-blended yogurt and granola, his gray knit vest catching and softening the springtime light. He’s discussing his impression of The University of Notre Dame, both 30 years ago, when he was a student, and today, when he’s back in South Bend, Indiana to partake in a class dedicated to him called “Strong Suits: The Art, Philosophy and Business of Thom Browne.” 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  13. Our Many Jesuses

    According to Robin Jensen, an art historian and professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame, the Gospels give warrant for such variety, since they never physically describe Jesus and recount that, after his resurrection, some of his own disciples did not recognize him. For Christian Smith, a professor of sociology at Notre Dame, the proliferation of rival ideas of what Jesus stands for undermines the cultural authority of them all, by feeding into the “pluralistic, subjectivistic, relativistic” understanding of religion that prevails in contemporary America. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  14. Rewriting the English Curriculum

    The University of Notre Dame, which recently restructured its English major requirements, plans to better integrate traditional literary studies with creative writing courses beginning next fall ... Though the details haven’t yet been fully mapped out, Laura Knoppers, chair of the university’s English department, gave the example of a creative writing professor teaching a course in Caribbean literature that could count as a creative writing course or a literature course, fulfilling the degree’s requirement for a class on cultural literature. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  15. Vietnam soldier’s family reunited with dog tag after journey around the globe

    Fifty years ago today, the last American combat troops left Vietnam. Harry Smith shares the remarkable lengths former Senator Jim Webb and a group of Notre Dame students went to return a dog tag from the battlefield to the family of a Vietnam veteran.

     

    Originally published at ndisc.nd.edu.

  16. Catholic colleges cut humanities programs, citing student interest in other fields

    At the University of Notre Dame, Sarah Mustillo, dean of the College of Arts and Letters, questioned the federal data on humanities graduates for the school.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  17. This is the personality test you should take, says psychologist—it’s a ‘better predictor of behavior’

    “They don’t get into the dirty underbelly of personality,” said David Watson, a professor of personality psychology at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  18. Economists believe the Fed will keep raising rates despite the banking turmoil

    “The Fed is really caught between a rock and a hard place,” said Christiane Baumeister, a professor at the University of Notre Dame. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  19. The numbers that are too big to imagine

    To get my head around just how big this is, I spoke with the mathematician Joel David Hamkins of the University of Notre Dame in the US, who writes a newsletter about enormous numbers and infinity called Infinitely More.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  20. Remembering former Rep. Pat Schroeder

    Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Notre Dame political scientist Christina Wolbrecht about the legacy of Rep. Pat Schroeder, who died at the age of 82.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.