Latest News

Video: Katie Fallon ’98 on working at the White House, her new corporate role, and her liberal arts education

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Alumni and General News

“It's very easy to lose track of how to form arguments in a way that can really change minds. At Notre Dame, this ability is really drilled into you from day one,” said Katie Beirne Fallon ’98, senior vice president and global head of corporate affairs at Hilton Worldwide. A governemnt and international studies major at Notre Dame, she previously served as director of legislative affairs at the White House for President Barack Obama, working to improve the relationship between Congress and the Office of the President. 

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Three Arts and Letters majors named to prestigious Yenching Scholars program

A trio of Notre Dame students and alumni have been named Yenching Scholars, a globally competitive award that provides a full scholarship and stipend to pursue an interdisciplinary master’s degree at China’s top university. Teresa Kennedy ’16, an anthropology and peace studies major from Wilbraham, Massachusetts; senior Jenny Ng, a political science major from Sai Kung, Hong Kong; and Dominic Romeo ’14, a political science and Chinese major from Turlock, California, were named to the third cohort entering the Yenching Academy, based at Peking University in Beijing.

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Sociologist uses technology to track how people connect—and how those connections impact behavior

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

What draws people to become friends, leads them to form social networks, and what keeps those relationships going? Omar Lizardo, a professor of sociology, is seeking to answer those questions as he researches whether people with similar health habits and even sleep patterns are naturally drawn together — and whether those friendships influence people’s attitudes and health and fitness choices.

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When faced with decisions of life and death, doctor relies on ethics and values forged studying the liberal arts

Author: Jack Rooney

Categories: Alumni and General News

The decisions Dr. James Gajewski ’78 makes are often ones of life and death. Over the course of his nearly 35-year medical career, the Portland, Oregon-based hematologist has specialized in stem cell and bone marrow transplants and cancer treatment, where anywhere from 30 to 70 percent of his patients may die. When he’s faced with difficult decisions, though, he relies not on his medical training, but on his College of Arts Letters education.

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Sociology major prepares undergraduate for law school, career in public service

Author: Megan Valley

Categories: General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

Notre Dame senior Ash Smith wants to become a public-interest attorney in order to fight for justice for marginalized populations. And majoring in sociology has played a key role in preparing her for that future. “Sociology lets you study some of the bigger questions, like why we have a lot of the social issues we have today. ” Smith said. “If you’re interested in law school, sociology is a great way to study how these different groups are discriminated against, how the law can help, and how people work together to develop practical solutions.”

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Theology and peace studies Ph.D. wins Louisville Institute fellowship for research on nonviolent activism

Author: Megan Valley

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, and Research

Kyle Lambelet, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s dual theology and peace studies program, has been awarded a Louisville Institute Dissertation Fellowship to support his research on the theology and ethics of nonviolent movements in the U.S. Lambelet’s dissertation is structured around four dilemmas he found nonviolent activists face: the use of liturgy in political movements, building coalitions in the context of pluralism, the transgression and appropriation of the law to support movement aims, and the appeal to exemplary figures to motivate movement activism.

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Video: History Ph.D. candidate Adam Foley on winning the Rome Prize

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

Adam Foley won a 2015-2016 Rome Prize fellowship, awarded by the American Academy in Rome. The Rome Prize supports innovative and cross-disciplinary work in the arts and humanities. Fellows are given a stipend, room and board, and individual work space at the Academy’s eleven-acre campus in Rome.

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Video: English and Italian alumna on turning a passion for language into a career abroad

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Alumni, General News, and Internationalism

“Do what you feel naturally inclined to do, where your skills and abilities are taking you, what you're best at. It really has helped me to narrow down and find the right career,” said Elizabeth Simari ’08. An English and Italian major in the College of Arts and Letters, Simari studied abroad in Rome during her junior year. Her interest in the language, history, and culture of Italy developed into a passion, leading her to move to Sicily after graduation. After teaching English for a year and then earning a master's degree in literature, she wrote for L'Osservatore Romano, the Vatican’s English-language newspaper, and now teaches at the University of Loyola Chicago's campus in Rome.

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American Philosophical Association awards highest honor to Notre Dame professor

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Robert Audi, John A. O’Brien Professor of Philosophy, has been awarded the American Philosophical Association’s 2016 Quinn Prize, its highest honor for service to the profession. The author of 20 books and numerous articles on ethics, the theory of knowledge, and the philosophy of religion, Audi’s teaching, public lectures, and research focus primarily on fields including moral and political philosophy, theory of knowledge and justification, and philosophy and religion. His work has applications for topics ranging from business ethics to the separation of church and state.

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Arts and Letters alumna builds international banking career

Author: Dorothy Wallheimer

Categories: Alumni, General News, and Internationalism

When Linda Wilbert Parish enrolled at Notre Dame in fall 1973—the year after the University first admitted women—she was one of only about 400 female students on campus. Since graduating in 1977 with a degree in American studies and foreign languages, Parish has built a career in the banking industry that has taken her around the world. From an internship at Goldman Sachs, she has worked her way up to her current position, senior vice president at Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

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Video: Sociologist Jennifer Jones on changing race relations, immigration, and state politics

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Jennifer Jones is an assistant professor of sociology and a faculty fellow at the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Her research uses qualitative methods to explore increasing migration, the growing multiracial population, and shifting social relations between and within racial groups. In this video, she discusses her work on how race relations are changing and what race means for politics and inequality.

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Video: Fostering intellectual community in the Notre Dame Berlin Seminar

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Graduate Students, and Internationalism

“The Notre Dame Berlin Seminar provides something that no graduate program in the United States can do, and indeed no professional can access very easily simply from your home institution,” said William Collins Donahue, the John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities and chair of the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures. The Notre Dame Berlin Seminar is a two-week program where faculty and advanced graduate student Germanists gather in Berlin to examine a particular topic. For the first three years of the program, participants will explore Der Literaturbetrieb, German literary institutions. What makes the program exceptional is that participants will meet with authors, archivists, publishers, and reviewers working in Germany, as well as visiting presses, libraries, archives, and theaters to get a full picture of Germany’s literary scene.

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Three faculty members elected to Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology

Author: Megan Valley

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Notre Dame Associate Professors Lijuan Wang, Guangjian Zhang, and Zhiyong Zhang have recently been elected to the Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology. A small, selective society that facilitates high-level research and interaction among its affiliates, SMEP is limited to 65 active members. With the trio’s election, Notre Dame’s Department of Psychology now has six members in the society—no other department in the country has more.

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Music history and liturgy professor elected president of Medieval Academy of America

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Margot E. Fassler, the Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Music History and Liturgy at Notre Dame, will become president of the Medieval Academy of America in April. As head of the largest organization in the United States promoting excellence in the field of medieval studies, Fassler hopes to focus attention on a historical era that she believes can provide better understanding of the political, environmental, and class problems currently facing the globe.

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Dianne Pinderhughes honored with creation of mentorship legacy award

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Faculty News and General News

Dianne Pinderhughes has been honored by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists with the creation of the Dianne M. Pinderhughes Mentorship Legacy Award. The award provides funding for undergraduate students to attend the NCOBPS annual meeting. Created by her former students, it honors Pinderhughes’ positive influence on their careers and her longstanding commitment to mentoring.

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Wilderness, reverence, and the written word: Alumnus Barry Lopez to speak at Notre Dame

Author: Rachel Novick

Categories: Alumni, Arts, Centers and Institutes, and General News

Barry Lopez’s work has taken him to more than 80 countries over the past 50 years, including some of the most inhospitable places on earth. But on March 9, Lopez is coming home to his alma mater to discuss a topic both timely and close to his heart: the writer’s role in engaging the public on environmental issues.

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NIH awards $3 million to Shaw Center for Children and Families

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

The National Institutes of Health has awarded researchers at the University of Notre Dame a $3 million grant to study the relationships between parents and infants, the first study of its kind that will include fathers as well as mothers as participants. The researchers, who will work with babies living with their married or co-habiting parents, will study the stability of the parents’ relationship and its effect on the wellbeing of their baby. Parents will go through a program designed to encourage healthy parenting and communication

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