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Notre Dame launches BIG Lab to address global poverty and economic inequality

Author: Katie Jamieson

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Even the most effective poverty alleviation programs in low-income countries can leave some people behind. Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies have a big idea on how to bridge that gap. The new Building Inclusive Growth (BIG) Lab, led by Notre Dame economists Taryn Dinkelman, Lakshmi Iyer, and Joseph Kaboski, will bring some of the world’s best researchers together to develop innovative, long-lasting solutions to help vulnerable populations in developing countries.

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Two-day gathering to celebrate Afro-Latinx poetry with acclaimed poets and scholars through talks, conversations, and performances

Author: Institute for Latino Studies

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Arts

A renowned group of 12 poets and scholars from across the country will convene at the University of Notre Dame from Sept. 27–28 for a dynamic cultural event featuring talks, conversations, and performances that will showcase the vitality and diversity of contemporary poetry.

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A&L faculty win NEH grants for book about history of red hair and philosophy of revelation project

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News and Centers and Institutes

White’s book juxtaposes cultural history with genomic discoveries to analyze how redheads — who carry the genetic variant MC1R — have been alternately abused, glorified and discriminated against through a wide range of times and locations, from ancient Egypt to the present-day United States. Betz will co-direct a project to create a critical edition of F.W.J. von Schelling’s original 1831-32 Munich lectures on the philosophy of revelation, which represent a profound attempt to wrestle with the nature and significance of religion and specifically with claims of divine revelation — or moments of divine self-disclosure.

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Lucy Family Institute for Data & Society funds A&L faculty project proposals

Author: Alissa Doroh

Categories: Faculty News and Centers and Institutes

Proposals were awarded in four tracks: Convening, Research Accelerator, Infrastructure & Services, and Partnerships. After a substantial review process, the Institute funded 13 projects that involve collaboration among all colleges and schools and are intended to generate translational value for societal benefit.

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Notre Dame receives record-breaking $244 million in annual research awards

Author: Brett Beasley

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

A $997,387 award from Lilly Endowment Inc. is preparing graduate students in the Department of Theology to better serve in, and learn from, a diverse and changing world. The five-year project builds on the University’s commitment to serve a world in need and to learn from the wisdom, faith, and struggles of marginalized peoples through that engagement.

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English Ph.D. alumna pens chapter for The Book About Everything — a culmination of the Global Ulysses project

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: Internationalism, Graduate Students, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

For Shinjini Chattopadhyay, Ulysses provides a blueprint for understanding modern life in post-colonial times. The winner of Notre Dame's Outstanding Graduate Student Teacher Award will begin as a tenure-track assistant professor at Berry College in Georgia this fall.

 

 

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Two A&L alumnae named 2022 Yenching Scholars

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Research, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Ann Hermann, who double-majored in computer science and Chinese, will research comparative tech policy and social media algorithms in the U.S. and China. Susan Peters, who majored in international economics with a concentration in Chinese, will examine effects of recent changes in China’s “cram,” or test-prep, school policies.

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Political science professor wins Emerging Scholar Award from American Political Science Association

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

The annual honor recognizes Jeff Harden as the top scholar in the field of state politics and policy who has earned a Ph.D. within the previous 10 years. He said it’s a meaningful time to be studying state legislatures because they have enormous power in what people's lives look like as citizens of this country.

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Notre Dame faculty advance research related to the Church sexual abuse crisis

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

In March 2019, Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., announced that the University would provide funding to support research projects that address issues emerging from the Church sexual abuse crisis. Since that announcement, 10 grants have been administered through the Church Sexual Abuse Crisis Research Grant Program to researchers in the College of Arts and Letters, the Institute for Educational Initiatives, the Keough School of Global Affairs, the Law School, and the Mendoza College of Business. 

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Dinah Lawan '22 awarded prize for paper exploring strategic peace-building in Nigeria

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Dinah Lawan won the 2022 Gary F. Barnabo Political Science Writing Prize for the best paper about a current national or global issue that provides a plan for specific action and a nonviolent resolution. Lawan recommended a peacebuilding approach to effectively dismantle Boko Haram, which has has killed more than 350,000 people in Nigeria.

 

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Chinese and computer science major Margaret Rauch exemplifies excellence in research, service

The Illinois resident became interested in studying Chinese when her aunt moved to Beijing to report on the 2008 Olympics. Margaret Rauch thrived in her ND Chinese language classes, completing the highest level in her sophomore year. She then took Classical Chinese and designed an independent research project—three semesters of directed readings that examined Su Xuelin, a May Fourth Intellectual who converted to Catholicism and wrote horny Heart

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Four 2022 grads share how Romance languages and literatures enriched their lives

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Q and A, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Irma Ibarra, who spoke Spanish and English when she arrived in South Bend, majored in Italian, studied in Rome, took Beginning French, and wishes she had taken a Portuguese course. Studying French helped Kyle Dorshorst gain a deeper appreciation of French music, literature, art, and culture. Maria Teel loved that her language skills could bridge gaps between people, including at the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. When Fouad El Zoghbi came to Notre Dame, he spoke French, English, and Arabic. Then he studied Spanish. Learning a new language, he said, expands your mind in unimaginable ways.

 

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4 A&L faculty members awarded Notre Dame Research grants

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Michel Hockx, Timothy Matovina, Jason Ruiz, and James Rudolph won grants from Notre Dame Research for their respective projects involving Foreign Office files for India, the Gustavo Gutiérrez, O.P. Papers, materials documenting Native American and Catholic encounters, and advancing the cross-disciplinary user experience lab: equipment restoration and renewal for faculty and graduate level research in the Design Department. 

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A Q&A with Karl Berg ’22 on the Early Christian Studies program, coordinating a new graduate conference, and why Notre Dame is a great place for classics and theology research

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Karl Berg ’22, who earned an M.A. in Early Christian Studies from Notre Dame’s Department of Classics, is co-organizing the Inaugural Graduate Conference on Early Christian Studies, to be held May 23–25 in Jenkins Nanovic Halls and on Zoom. The conference, which will be the first of its kind in the United States, is free and open to the public. Berg will present a paper, “Augustine of Hippo and Late Roman Slavery.” Next up for the Littleton, Colorado, native: pursuing a D.Phil. in ancient history at the University of Oxford.

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Video: German professor Tobias Boes on nationalism, globalization, and the environmental humanities

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Tobias Boes is an associate professor of German and a Fellow of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on cultural relationships between Germany and the world at large, especially during the first half of the 20th century. In this interview, he discusses his book on Thomas Mann, his research on cultural dimensions of nationalism, and why he's developed an interest in the environmental humanities.

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6 A&L doctoral students chosen by NDIAS for Distinguished Graduate Fellowship Class

Author: J'Nese Williams

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, and Centers and Institutes

The dissertation projects of the graduate fellows — Jennifer Dudley, Jacob Kildoo, Arpit Kumar, Eileen Morgan, Bethany Wentz, and Greg Wurm — illuminate some aspect of The Public. “These six doctoral students impressed our committee this year with their exceptional research promise and their clear commitment to building an inclusive research community,” said Meghan Sullivan, director of the NDIAS and the Wilsey Family College Professor of Philosophy. “We are thrilled to welcome them alongside our faculty fellows next year and to sponsor work that will give us crucial insight on the nature of public life.” 

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A&L students Miguel Coste and Noelle Dana named Phi Beta Kappa Key into Public Service Scholars

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Centers and Institutes

The juniors, chosen from among nearly 900 applicants nationwide, are Notre Dame's second and third Phi Beta Kappa Key into Public Service Scholars. They'll each receive a $5,000 undergraduate scholarship. Miguel Coste is a neuroscience and behavior major in the College of Arts and Letters from Tampa, Florida. Noelle Dana is a classics and philosophy major, with a concentration in philosophy, science and mathematics, and a business economics and Hesburgh Program in Public Service minor from Hampden, Maine.

 

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American studies professor receives NEH fellowship for book on Turkey, Iran, and the history of comparisons made between the two

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Perin Gürel, a Notre Dame associate professor of American studies, has won a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for Research in Turkey, in support of the completion of a book on the international history of comparisons made between Turkey and Iran. Her research will detail the history of comparisons made between Turkey and Iran, but Gürel also intends to critique the intellectual valorization of comparison itself. Sharp distinctions about areas of the world are often made, she said, despite the relatively arbitrary nature of borders between countries — not to mention the ways in which subjectively comparing one thing to another permeates other aspects of life.

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History major Eoghan Fay shares details of his trip to London to conduct capstone research

Author: Eoghan Fay

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

After a week in London, Eoghan Fay had a suitcase full of souvenirs, a legal pad full of notes, and a head full of memories. Next semester, he'll work on his capstone project using the research from his trip, which was made possible by a Spring Break 2022 Research Grant from the Nanovic Institute for European Studies.

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Anthropology major embarks on effort to preserve and document her native Nigerian language, spoken by only 200,000 people

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Godiya Simon came to Notre Dame needing to learn a language in order to be successful. Now, she’s headed to an elite graduate program in part because of her work to ensure another language never goes extinct. Simon didn’t know just how rare her native language of Kibaku was until a conversation one day with her linguistic anthropology professor — a realization that inspired her to create a cross-continental multimedia effort to preserve and document it. In the process, she’s written a senior thesis, created a children’s book, spent a summer in Hawaii learning research skills, presented at a conference, and developed a clear vision for her post-graduate goals. 

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Notre Dame historian wins NEH grant for project that seeks to disrupt understanding of why the Habsburg Empire crumbled

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

John Deak, a Notre Dame associate professor of history, has won a collaborative research grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for an ambitious research project that seeks to reshape perspectives on how and why the Habsburg Empire collapsed after World War I. Partnering with historian Jonathan Gumz of the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, Deak’s three-year grant will support significant archival work across Europe as the scholars explore how the wartime imposition of martial law crushed local political authority and ultimately wiped a 600-year empire off the map.

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Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie to speak, hold book signing

Author: Sue Ryan

Categories: Centers and Institutes and Arts

New York Times bestselling author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will speak at the University of Notre Dame at 7:30 p.m. March 25 (Friday) at Leighton Concert Hall in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Presented by the Sr. Kathleen Cannon, O.P., Distinguished Lecture Series, this event was originally scheduled for March 2020 and was postponed due to the pandemic. The event is free, but ticketed. Adichie is a MacArthur “Genius Grant” winner and is known for books such as Americanah, Half of a Yellow Sun, Purple Hibiscus and We Should All Be Feminists, which was translated into 32 languages and based on her 2012 TED Talk. 

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Theology professor’s research provides new insights on divine mercy and divine vengeance in the Qur’an

Author: Josh Stowe

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

In his latest published work, Gabriel Said Reynolds explores the paradox of divine mercy and divine vengeance—a puzzle with which scholars have long wrestled. The project, Allah: God in the Qur’an, (Yale University Press, 2020), enabled him to engage with the Bible, the Qur’an, and Muslim-Christian relations in ways that reach both fellow scholars and a broader audience. “It's an engaged reading of a text from a curious outsider who brings to the table some knowledge of the biblical subtext of the Qur’an,” said Reynolds, the Jerome J. Crowley and Rosaleen G. Crowley Professor of Theology. “I’m not the first to notice this, obviously—it’s a big issue in the Bible as well—but it comes to the fore in the Qur’an.”

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Political scientist Aníbal Pérez-Liñán named director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies

Author: Karen Clay

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, a professor of political science and global affairs at the University of Notre Dame, has been named director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies in the Keough School of Global Affairs effective July 1. An accomplished teacher and widely cited scholar of processes of democratization, political instability, and the rule of law in new democracies, he has a strong international reputation as a leading expert on Latin American democracy.

 

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Creative writing faculty member’s debut novel spotlights devastation of Hurricane Maria

Author: Oliver Ortega & Brittany Blagburn

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Centers and Institutes, and Arts

It’s been five years since Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico. The grief, trauma, and political ramifications of this seismic event in the island’s history are skillfully rendered in Xavier Navarro Aquino’s new novel, Velorio. It’s a powerful debut for Navarro Aquino, an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Notre Dame and a faculty fellow at the Institute for Latino Studies.

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Political scientists reflect on Brown Jackson and Childs as frontrunners for Supreme Court nomination

Author: Carrie Gates and Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Centers and Institutes

On the campaign trail, President Joe Biden committed to nominating a Black woman to any Supreme Court vacancy that might arise during his term in office. After Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement on Thursday, Biden reiterated his intention. Notre Dame political scientists Dianne Pinderhughes, Matthew Hall, and Christina Wolbrecht weighted in on the candidates like to be on Biden’s short list.

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Ernest Morrell, A&L associate dean and literacy scholar, elected to the National Academy of Education

Author: Theo Helm

Categories: General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Ernest Morrell, the associate dean for the humanities and equity in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and the director of the Center for Literacy Education, has been elected to the National Academy of Education. The Academy advances high-quality research that improves education quality and practice. Members are elected on the basis of outstanding scholarship related to education.

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Psychologist Darcia Narvaez named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Darcia Narvaez, a Notre Dame professor emerita in the Department of Psychology, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the largest international body of professional scientists in the world and publisher of the prestigious journal Science. Narvaez is being honored for her distinguished contributions illuminating typical and atypical development in terms of well-being, morality and sustainable wisdom. A total of 39 Notre Dame faculty members are now AAAS fellows.

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