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Ph.D. candidate from the UK takes road less traveled to ND, launches Medieval Institute podcast

Author: Eric Heath

Categories: Graduate Students and Centers and Institutes

When Will Beattie reflected on conversations he was having with his fellow cohort members about teamwork and collaboration, one day inspiration struck. He would launch a podcast about the work of his colleagues — scholars doing the meticulous, and sometimes invisible, work of medieval studies. His plan was to invite medievalists onto the show to tell listeners what it was like to track down a long-forgotten manuscript or to gain access to the world’s most restrictive libraries.

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Anthropology alumna Fauvé Liggans-Hubbard named 2023 Rangel Fellow

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Centers and Institutes and Alumni

“Living abroad for the past five years, I was often the first Black and/or American my foreign students met, so I believe it is important for U.S. diplomats abroad to reflect the diverse American population,” said Fauvé Liggans-Hubbard. “These experiences, along with many others, solidified my passion for cultural exchange, and I couldn’t be more proud to be a part of a program that aims to increase diversity in the U.S. Foreign Service.”

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de Nicola Center hosts expert roundtable discussion on caring for women and children in a post–Roe world

Author: Kenneth Hallenius

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

The de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture at the University of Notre Dame will mark the 50th anniversary of Roe v. Wade in Washington, D.C., on Thursday with an expert roundtable discussion on how best to care for and protect mothers, babies, and families in the wake of the Dobbs v. Jackson Supreme Court decision. “Building a Civilization of Love” will bring together experts in law, medicine, social science, public health, and social service to discuss the most important opportunities for and challenges to protecting the intrinsic equal dignity of every member of the human family following the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Dobbs

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Anthropologist wins prestigious NEH fellowship to explore toll of climate change in Sierra Leone

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Notre Dame anthropologist Catherine “Cat” Bolten has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to support the writing of her book that examines links between food insecurity, human population growth and wildlife depletion, land politics and degradation, and climate change in Sierra Leone. The associate professor of anthropology and peace studies is one of 70 scholars — from among more than 1,030 applicants nationwide — to be awarded the competitive fellowships. 

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How majoring in political science and Arabic prepared Erin Hayes ’18 for a job in Egypt and grad school in England

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

"I feel like Notre Dame helped me with seizing opportunities to go abroad," said Hayes, who now is attending Officer Candidate School and plans to join the U.S. Navy. "I had never left the country, other than to go to Canada. And then [at Notre Dame], I saw there were study abroad experiences and grants to go abroad. That really gave me the travel bug."

 

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Morrell, Berends again achieve Edu-Scholar ranking for doing most to shape educational practice, policy

Author: Theo Helm

Categories: Research, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

“Our selection shows the national impact that Notre Dame has on the K-12 education landscape in the United States,” Mark Berends said. “As we look to the new year, we and the talented faculty we represent at Notre Dame seek to continue to improve educational opportunities for all children.”

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Q&A: Three Notre Dame students share why they're majoring in psychology

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Q and A, and Centers and Institutes

Sophia Alvarez's favorite class is CogSci Goes to School, which examines how cognitive science informs educational practices; it includes tutoring in area schools. Ryan Van Kirk enjoyed Childhood Maltreatment Practicum, which involves mentoring a child in the foster care system. For Chris Walsh, Drunk on Film fostered meaningful discussions about the normalization of binge drinking in our culture.

 

 

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Notre Dame faculty experts reflect on life, legacy of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes and Catholicism

“Joseph Ratzinger’s death in some ways marks the end of the post-Vatican II era,” said John McGreevy, the Charles and Jill Fischer Provost. “He was the last living major figure from the council, which is now sliding from living memory into history. Working with his friend and patron, Pope John Paul II — his predecessor — before his own election in 2005, he helped set the agenda within the Church and sometimes within the wider world for a full 35 years.”

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Camping in Wyoming: Merit scholars connect with nature, and each other, before beginning classes at Notre Dame

Author: Oliver Ortega

Categories: Undergraduate News and Centers and Institutes

In Bridger-Teton National Forest last summer, nine incoming Notre Dame merit scholars camped for four nights as part of an excursion sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies. The newest group of Latino Studies merit scholars, also known as LSSP 6, hiked 3-6 miles a day. "Overall, it was the bonding experiences between my fellow scholars that I most appreciated," said Johanna Jimenez, a pre-health major from Minneapolis.

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Rethinking Scrooge: Could Dickens’ most famous character be neurodivergent?

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

“He eats the same melancholy meal each day at the same melancholy tavern — and we have to join the dots on that one and say ‘because he’s mean.’ But it may well be that we shouldn’t infer that at all, and we should just say ‘because he has to, because that’s his routine and that’s what he needs,'" said Essaka Joshua. The associate professor of English argues that many of Scrooge’s behaviors can be seen as cognitive and behavioral coping strategies commonly used by neurodivergent individuals to reduce anxiety, by avoiding social interactions, sticking to routines and using verification rituals to calm himself.

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Center for Social Concerns launches new prison education initiative with lunch, panel discussion

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

In collaboration with Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross Colleges, Marian University, the Bard Prison Initiative and the Indiana Department of Correction, Notre Dame Programs for Education in Prison reorganizes a number of new and existing education programs under a single umbrella within the Center for Social Concerns.

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Fair or fraudulent?: Notre Dame political scientist examines public confidence in the 2022 midterm elections

Author: Brett Beasley

Categories: Research, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

“We hope to do more than just to contribute to scholarship on understanding the election fraud information environment," said Brian Fogarty, director of the Center for Social Science Research. "We also want to provide insight and solutions that can reverse the deterioration of democratic norms in contemporary American society.”

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‘On the brink of a new civil war’: Rooney Center survey highlights fragility of American democracy, stark partisan divides

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes

“Is it really as bad as it seems? The answer is yes,” said Matthew Hall, the David A. Potenziani Memorial Professor of Constitutional Studies. “The key is not that what happens in the midterm elections will be inherently anti-democratic — it’s that they may put in place officials who could then undermine our democracy in 2024. Although other poll questions showed that very few participants said they’re willing to engage in political violence or support the use of it, it seems that everyone is expecting it. It’s an interesting, if worrisome, juxtaposition.”

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In memoriam: L. John Roos, professor emeritus of political science

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Roos received the Sheedy Award, the Joyce and Dockweiler Awards for undergraduate teaching and mentorship, and a Notre Dame Presidential Award for service to the campus community. The Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy annually presents the John Roos Award to students with the best senior honors thesis in American politics.

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Sen. Tim Scott to speak at Notre Dame about restoring hope and unity in America

Author: Center for Citizenship & Constitutional Government

Categories: Centers and Institutes

Sen. Scott, who grew up in poverty in a single-family household, has been an advocate for creating more opportunities for families living paycheck-to-paycheck and helping children from impoverished communities have access to quality education. He has represented South Carolina in the U.S. Senate since 2013.

 

 

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Medieval studies helped prepare Alex Miller '92 to be a strategic business executive

Author: Lucy Grinnan

Categories: Q and A, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

"We must decide the type of world that we want to live in and make sacrifices and changes to achieve that outcome," said Miller. "Leaders that can grasp just how much has changed between the Middle Ages and the present day will find it easier to find that 'true north' moral conviction to be passionate stewards for change."

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New prison education initiative unites Notre Dame efforts to offer opportunities for liberal arts education to incarcerated individuals

Author: JP Shortall

Categories: General News and Centers and Institutes

A new prison education initiative will bring five local, state and national prison education programs together in one effort to be housed at the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns. Notre Dame Programs for Education in Prisons (NDPEP) will offer opportunities for liberal arts education to people incarcerated in Indiana, create the infrastructure to support NDPEP participants as they re-enter their home communities, and provide faculty and student opportunities for education and research on issues related to incarceration.

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Notre Dame launches BIG Lab to address global poverty and economic inequality

Author: Katie Jamieson

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Even the most effective poverty alleviation programs in low-income countries can leave some people behind. Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies have a big idea on how to bridge that gap. The new Building Inclusive Growth (BIG) Lab, led by Notre Dame economists Taryn Dinkelman, Lakshmi Iyer, and Joseph Kaboski, will bring some of the world’s best researchers together to develop innovative, long-lasting solutions to help vulnerable populations in developing countries.

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Two-day gathering to celebrate Afro-Latinx poetry with acclaimed poets and scholars through talks, conversations, and performances

Author: Institute for Latino Studies

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Arts

A renowned group of 12 poets and scholars from across the country will convene at the University of Notre Dame from Sept. 27–28 for a dynamic cultural event featuring talks, conversations, and performances that will showcase the vitality and diversity of contemporary poetry.

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A&L faculty win NEH grants for book about history of red hair and philosophy of revelation project

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News and Centers and Institutes

White’s book juxtaposes cultural history with genomic discoveries to analyze how redheads — who carry the genetic variant MC1R — have been alternately abused, glorified and discriminated against through a wide range of times and locations, from ancient Egypt to the present-day United States. Betz will co-direct a project to create a critical edition of F.W.J. von Schelling’s original 1831-32 Munich lectures on the philosophy of revelation, which represent a profound attempt to wrestle with the nature and significance of religion and specifically with claims of divine revelation — or moments of divine self-disclosure.

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Lucy Family Institute for Data & Society funds A&L faculty project proposals

Author: Alissa Doroh

Categories: Faculty News and Centers and Institutes

Proposals were awarded in four tracks: Convening, Research Accelerator, Infrastructure & Services, and Partnerships. After a substantial review process, the Institute funded 13 projects that involve collaboration among all colleges and schools and are intended to generate translational value for societal benefit.

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Notre Dame receives record-breaking $244 million in annual research awards

Author: Brett Beasley

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

A $997,387 award from Lilly Endowment Inc. is preparing graduate students in the Department of Theology to better serve in, and learn from, a diverse and changing world. The five-year project builds on the University’s commitment to serve a world in need and to learn from the wisdom, faith, and struggles of marginalized peoples through that engagement.

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English Ph.D. alumna pens chapter for The Book About Everything — a culmination of the Global Ulysses project

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: Internationalism, Graduate Students, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

For Shinjini Chattopadhyay, Ulysses provides a blueprint for understanding modern life in post-colonial times. The winner of Notre Dame's Outstanding Graduate Student Teacher Award will begin as a tenure-track assistant professor at Berry College in Georgia this fall.

 

 

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Two A&L alumnae named 2022 Yenching Scholars

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Research, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Ann Hermann, who double-majored in computer science and Chinese, will research comparative tech policy and social media algorithms in the U.S. and China. Susan Peters, who majored in international economics with a concentration in Chinese, will examine effects of recent changes in China’s “cram,” or test-prep, school policies.

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Political science professor wins Emerging Scholar Award from American Political Science Association

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

The annual honor recognizes Jeff Harden as the top scholar in the field of state politics and policy who has earned a Ph.D. within the previous 10 years. He said it’s a meaningful time to be studying state legislatures because they have enormous power in what people's lives look like as citizens of this country.

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Notre Dame faculty advance research related to the Church sexual abuse crisis

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

In March 2019, Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., announced that the University would provide funding to support research projects that address issues emerging from the Church sexual abuse crisis. Since that announcement, 10 grants have been administered through the Church Sexual Abuse Crisis Research Grant Program to researchers in the College of Arts and Letters, the Institute for Educational Initiatives, the Keough School of Global Affairs, the Law School, and the Mendoza College of Business. 

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Dinah Lawan '22 awarded prize for paper exploring strategic peace-building in Nigeria

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Dinah Lawan won the 2022 Gary F. Barnabo Political Science Writing Prize for the best paper about a current national or global issue that provides a plan for specific action and a nonviolent resolution. Lawan recommended a peacebuilding approach to effectively dismantle Boko Haram, which has has killed more than 350,000 people in Nigeria.

 

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Chinese and computer science major Margaret Rauch exemplifies excellence in research, service

The Illinois resident became interested in studying Chinese when her aunt moved to Beijing to report on the 2008 Olympics. Margaret Rauch thrived in her ND Chinese language classes, completing the highest level in her sophomore year. She then took Classical Chinese and designed an independent research project—three semesters of directed readings that examined Su Xuelin, a May Fourth Intellectual who converted to Catholicism and wrote horny Heart

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Four 2022 grads share how Romance languages and literatures enriched their lives

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Q and A, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Irma Ibarra, who spoke Spanish and English when she arrived in South Bend, majored in Italian, studied in Rome, took Beginning French, and wishes she had taken a Portuguese course. Studying French helped Kyle Dorshorst gain a deeper appreciation of French music, literature, art, and culture. Maria Teel loved that her language skills could bridge gaps between people, including at the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. When Fouad El Zoghbi came to Notre Dame, he spoke French, English, and Arabic. Then he studied Spanish. Learning a new language, he said, expands your mind in unimaginable ways.

 

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