Latest News

Latest News » Centers and Institutes

Dinah Lawan '22 awarded prize for paper exploring strategic peace-building in Nigeria

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Alumni, Research, and Undergraduate News

Dinah Lawan won the 2022 Gary F. Barnabo Political Science Writing Prize for the best paper about a current national or global issue that provides a plan for specific action and a nonviolent resolution. Lawan recommended a peacebuilding approach to effectively dismantle Boko Haram, which has has killed more than 350,000 people in Nigeria.

 

Read More

Chinese and computer science major Margaret Rauch exemplifies excellence in research, service

The Illinois resident became interested in studying Chinese when her aunt moved to Beijing to report on the 2008 Olympics. Margaret Rauch thrived in her ND Chinese language classes, completing the highest level in her sophomore year. She then took Classical Chinese and designed an independent research project—three semesters of directed readings that examined Su Xuelin, a May Fourth Intellectual who converted to Catholicism and wrote horny Heart

Read More

Four 2022 grads share how Romance languages and literatures enriched their lives

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Alumni, Research, Undergraduate News, and Q and A

Irma Ibarra, who spoke Spanish and English when she arrived in South Bend, majored in Italian, studied in Rome, took Beginning French, and wishes she had taken a Portuguese course. Studying French helped Kyle Dorshorst gain a deeper appreciation of French music, literature, art, and culture. Maria Teel loved that her language skills could bridge gaps between people, including at the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. When Fouad El Zoghbi came to Notre Dame, he spoke French, English, and Arabic. Then he studied Spanish. Learning a new language, he said, expands your mind in unimaginable ways.

 

Read More

4 A&L faculty members awarded Notre Dame Research grants

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Michel Hockx, Timothy Matovina, Jason Ruiz, and James Rudolph won grants from Notre Dame Research for their respective projects involving Foreign Office files for India, the Gustavo Gutiérrez, O.P. Papers, materials documenting Native American and Catholic encounters, and advancing the cross-disciplinary user experience lab: equipment restoration and renewal for faculty and graduate level research in the Design Department. 

Read More

A Q&A with Karl Berg ’22 on the Early Christian Studies program, coordinating a new graduate conference, and why Notre Dame is a great place for classics and theology research

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Karl Berg ’22, who earned an M.A. in Early Christian Studies from Notre Dame’s Department of Classics, is co-organizing the Inaugural Graduate Conference on Early Christian Studies, to be held May 23–25 in Jenkins Nanovic Halls and on Zoom. The conference, which will be the first of its kind in the United States, is free and open to the public. Berg will present a paper, “Augustine of Hippo and Late Roman Slavery.” Next up for the Littleton, Colorado, native: pursuing a D.Phil. in ancient history at the University of Oxford.

Read More

Video: German professor Tobias Boes on nationalism, globalization, and the environmental humanities

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Tobias Boes is an associate professor of German and a Fellow of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on cultural relationships between Germany and the world at large, especially during the first half of the 20th century. In this interview, he discusses his book on Thomas Mann, his research on cultural dimensions of nationalism, and why he's developed an interest in the environmental humanities.

Read More

6 A&L doctoral students chosen by NDIAS for Distinguished Graduate Fellowship Class

Author: J'Nese Williams

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, and Centers and Institutes

The dissertation projects of the graduate fellows — Jennifer Dudley, Jacob Kildoo, Arpit Kumar, Eileen Morgan, Bethany Wentz, and Greg Wurm — illuminate some aspect of The Public. “These six doctoral students impressed our committee this year with their exceptional research promise and their clear commitment to building an inclusive research community,” said Meghan Sullivan, director of the NDIAS and the Wilsey Family College Professor of Philosophy. “We are thrilled to welcome them alongside our faculty fellows next year and to sponsor work that will give us crucial insight on the nature of public life.” 

Read More

A&L students Miguel Coste and Noelle Dana named Phi Beta Kappa Key into Public Service Scholars

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Centers and Institutes

The juniors, chosen from among nearly 900 applicants nationwide, are Notre Dame's second and third Phi Beta Kappa Key into Public Service Scholars. They'll each receive a $5,000 undergraduate scholarship. Miguel Coste is a neuroscience and behavior major in the College of Arts and Letters from Tampa, Florida. Noelle Dana is a classics and philosophy major, with a concentration in philosophy, science and mathematics, and a business economics and Hesburgh Program in Public Service minor from Hampden, Maine.

 

Read More

American studies professor receives NEH fellowship for book on Turkey, Iran, and the history of comparisons made between the two

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Perin Gürel, a Notre Dame associate professor of American studies, has won a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for Research in Turkey, in support of the completion of a book on the international history of comparisons made between Turkey and Iran. Her research will detail the history of comparisons made between Turkey and Iran, but Gürel also intends to critique the intellectual valorization of comparison itself. Sharp distinctions about areas of the world are often made, she said, despite the relatively arbitrary nature of borders between countries — not to mention the ways in which subjectively comparing one thing to another permeates other aspects of life.

Read More

History major Eoghan Fay shares details of his trip to London to conduct capstone research

Author: Eoghan Fay

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

After a week in London, Eoghan Fay had a suitcase full of souvenirs, a legal pad full of notes, and a head full of memories. Next semester, he'll work on his capstone project using the research from his trip, which was made possible by a Spring Break 2022 Research Grant from the Nanovic Institute for European Studies.

Read More

Anthropology major embarks on effort to preserve and document her native Nigerian language, spoken by only 200,000 people

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Godiya Simon came to Notre Dame needing to learn a language in order to be successful. Now, she’s headed to an elite graduate program in part because of her work to ensure another language never goes extinct. Simon didn’t know just how rare her native language of Kibaku was until a conversation one day with her linguistic anthropology professor — a realization that inspired her to create a cross-continental multimedia effort to preserve and document it. In the process, she’s written a senior thesis, created a children’s book, spent a summer in Hawaii learning research skills, presented at a conference, and developed a clear vision for her post-graduate goals. 

Read More

Notre Dame historian wins NEH grant for project that seeks to disrupt understanding of why the Habsburg Empire crumbled

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

John Deak, a Notre Dame associate professor of history, has won a collaborative research grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for an ambitious research project that seeks to reshape perspectives on how and why the Habsburg Empire collapsed after World War I. Partnering with historian Jonathan Gumz of the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, Deak’s three-year grant will support significant archival work across Europe as the scholars explore how the wartime imposition of martial law crushed local political authority and ultimately wiped a 600-year empire off the map.

Read More

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie to speak, hold book signing

Author: Sue Ryan

Categories: Centers and Institutes and Arts

New York Times bestselling author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will speak at the University of Notre Dame at 7:30 p.m. March 25 (Friday) at Leighton Concert Hall in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Presented by the Sr. Kathleen Cannon, O.P., Distinguished Lecture Series, this event was originally scheduled for March 2020 and was postponed due to the pandemic. The event is free, but ticketed. Adichie is a MacArthur “Genius Grant” winner and is known for books such as Americanah, Half of a Yellow Sun, Purple Hibiscus and We Should All Be Feminists, which was translated into 32 languages and based on her 2012 TED Talk. 

Read More

Theology professor’s research provides new insights on divine mercy and divine vengeance in the Qur’an

Author: Josh Stowe

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

In his latest published work, Gabriel Said Reynolds explores the paradox of divine mercy and divine vengeance—a puzzle with which scholars have long wrestled. The project, Allah: God in the Qur’an, (Yale University Press, 2020), enabled him to engage with the Bible, the Qur’an, and Muslim-Christian relations in ways that reach both fellow scholars and a broader audience. “It's an engaged reading of a text from a curious outsider who brings to the table some knowledge of the biblical subtext of the Qur’an,” said Reynolds, the Jerome J. Crowley and Rosaleen G. Crowley Professor of Theology. “I’m not the first to notice this, obviously—it’s a big issue in the Bible as well—but it comes to the fore in the Qur’an.”

Read More

Political scientist Aníbal Pérez-Liñán named director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies

Author: Karen Clay

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, a professor of political science and global affairs at the University of Notre Dame, has been named director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies in the Keough School of Global Affairs effective July 1. An accomplished teacher and widely cited scholar of processes of democratization, political instability, and the rule of law in new democracies, he has a strong international reputation as a leading expert on Latin American democracy.

 

Read More

Creative writing faculty member’s debut novel spotlights devastation of Hurricane Maria

Author: Oliver Ortega & Brittany Blagburn

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Centers and Institutes, and Arts

It’s been five years since Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico. The grief, trauma, and political ramifications of this seismic event in the island’s history are skillfully rendered in Xavier Navarro Aquino’s new novel, Velorio. It’s a powerful debut for Navarro Aquino, an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Notre Dame and a faculty fellow at the Institute for Latino Studies.

Read More

Political scientists reflect on Brown Jackson and Childs as frontrunners for Supreme Court nomination

Author: Carrie Gates and Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Centers and Institutes

On the campaign trail, President Joe Biden committed to nominating a Black woman to any Supreme Court vacancy that might arise during his term in office. After Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement on Thursday, Biden reiterated his intention. Notre Dame political scientists Dianne Pinderhughes, Matthew Hall, and Christina Wolbrecht weighted in on the candidates like to be on Biden’s short list.

Read More

Ernest Morrell, A&L associate dean and literacy scholar, elected to the National Academy of Education

Author: Theo Helm

Categories: General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Ernest Morrell, the associate dean for the humanities and equity in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and the director of the Center for Literacy Education, has been elected to the National Academy of Education. The Academy advances high-quality research that improves education quality and practice. Members are elected on the basis of outstanding scholarship related to education.

Read More

Psychologist Darcia Narvaez named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Darcia Narvaez, a Notre Dame professor emerita in the Department of Psychology, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the largest international body of professional scientists in the world and publisher of the prestigious journal Science. Narvaez is being honored for her distinguished contributions illuminating typical and atypical development in terms of well-being, morality and sustainable wisdom. A total of 39 Notre Dame faculty members are now AAAS fellows.

Read More

Andrew Burke, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar, awarded scholarship to study in Cambridge

Andrew Burke, who researches differential topology and is writing a senior thesis on algebraic geometry, has taken immersive coursework in mathematics, including graduate-level classes during his junior and senior years. Outside of the classroom, Burke is an offensive analyst for the Notre Dame football team and volunteers with Riverbend Math Circles. 

Read More

Alumnae awarded Thomas R. Pickering and Charles B. Rangel Graduate Fellowships

Author: Chloe McCotter

Categories: National Fellowships, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

College of Arts and Letters alumna Irla Atanda has been named a Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Fellow and alumna DeJorie Monroe has been selected a Charles B. Rangel Graduate Fellow. Atanda graduated from Notre Dame in 2020 with a bachelor’s degree in American studies and a minor in international development studies and Monroe graduated in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and minors in Latin American studies, Middle Eastern studies, and theology.

Read More

NEH awards three fellowships and a digital scholarship grant to Arts & Letters faculty, continuing Notre Dame’s record success

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Three faculty members in the College of Arts & Letters — philosopher Sara Bernstein, theatre scholar Tarryn Chun, and historian Katie Jarvis — have won National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, extending Notre Dame's record success with the federal agency committed to supporting original research and scholarship. The University also received a significant grant for a digital scholarship project that will develop a new platform that makes digital archives easier to analyze, present, and reuse. Since 2000, Arts & Letters faculty have received more NEH fellowships than any other private university in the country.

Read More

New Globally Engaged Citizens program allows Notre Dame students to demonstrate their intercultural competence and language skills

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures at Notre Dame has launched the Globally Engaged Citizens program, designed to reward students for their engagement with language and culture studies and encourage participation by students who are not required to take language classes. Through a combination of coursework and cultural experiences, the program offers Notre Dame students from all colleges and schools the opportunity to demonstrate that they have spent time during their college experience preparing to be a global citizen.

Read More

‘The Good Life Method’: In new book, Notre Dame philosophers help readers explore what makes life meaningful

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Many associate philosophy with the study of abstract theories of logic, human nature or the universe. But for Notre Dame philosophers Meghan Sullivan and Paul Blaschko it is also a practical approach to the issues of everyday life. Philosophy, they say, offers a sustainable, holistic and battle-tested approach to setting goals and finding meaning. In their new book, The Good Life Method: Reasoning Through the Big Questions of Happiness, Faith, and Meaning, Blaschko and Sullivan examine how the tenets of philosophy can help readers chart their course and ultimately determine what it means to live a good life.

Read More

Sociologist's study sheds light on relationship between COVID-19 vaccine messaging and faith communities

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

In the drive to vaccinate Americans against COVID-19, many question where faith communities stand. A new study by Notre Dame sociologist Kraig Beyerlein found that 30 percent of congregants in the United States heard solely encouraging messages about vaccination from faith leaders or fellow members. Another third heard both encouraging and discouraging messaging, and 32 percent heard no messaging at all. Notably, only 5 percent of American congregants received only discouraging messages concerning vaccination from their faith communities.

Read More

Philanthropy and the Common Good class awards $78,600 to local nonprofits

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Undergraduate News, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Offered through the Department of Political Science, the Hesburgh Program in Public Service, the Constitutional Studies minor, and the Center for Citizenship and Constitutional Government, Philanthropy and the Common Good is an experiential course that offers students the opportunity to engage with local nonprofits while learning about the history and role of philanthropy in the U.S. Students in the class this semester awarded grants totaling $78,600 to five organizations during a ceremony on the National Day of Giving.

Read More

Kathleen Sprows Cummings, 2021 Sheedy Award for Excellence in Teaching recipient, lauded for making history ‘come alive with connections from today’

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

On her first day teaching at Notre Dame in the late 1990s, then-doctoral student Kathleen Sprows Cummings asked her undergraduates in Ethnicity and American Identity to share why they were taking the course. “Nothing else was open,” was the first reply. It wasn’t the only one.

Times change. Cummings, now the Rev. John A. O'Brien Collegiate Professor of American Studies and History and director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, is the winner of the 2021 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award, the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts & Letters. “She has shaped me into a better student, Catholic, woman, and member of society,” one senior wrote in her letter recommending Cummings for the award. “I strive to become the type of woman and professional that she is.”

Read More

Debuting solo show at Notre Dame, artist-in-residence Reginald Dwayne Betts explores lasting effects of incarceration and the power of the written word

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Arts

When Reginald Dwayne Betts hears the word prison, his first thoughts aren’t about violence or distance or time — he thinks about books. Betts, an artist-in-residence at the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study and the Notre Dame Initiative on Race and Resilience, was sentenced to nine years in prison as a 16-year-old. It was there that a book, slid under the door of his cell, changed the course of his life. Now an acclaimed poet, graduate of Yale Law School and 2021 MacArthur Fellow, Betts presented the debut of his solo show Nov. 17 and 18 in the Regis Philbin Studio Theatre at the University of Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

Read More