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James Webb, former senator and secretary of the Navy, named inaugural distinguished fellow at Notre Dame International Security Center

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Notre Dame’s International Security Center (NDISC) has named James Webb its first distinguished fellow. Webb — a Vietnam Marine combat veteran, former senator, and former secretary of the Navy — is a national security and foreign policy specialist and the author of 10 books. “It is an honor and a distinct pleasure to be working with the leadership and students of Notre Dame,” Webb said. “I look forward to both teaching and learning through my interactions over the coming months.”

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Sociologist Mark Berends elected to the National Academy of Education

Author: Institute for Educational Initiatives

Categories: General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Mark Berends, the director of the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Research on Educational Opportunity and a professor of sociology, has been elected to the National Academy of Education. The Academy advances high-quality research that improves education quality and practice. Members are elected on the basis of outstanding scholarship related to education.

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Notre Dame among top Fulbright producers for sixth consecutive year

Notre Dame was 23rd among all research institutions with 15 Fulbright students for the current academic year, according to results published Monday (Feb. 10) in The Chronicle of Higher Education. In applying for the award, student winners worked closely with the Graduate School’s Office of Grants and Fellowships or the Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE).

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In France, Benin, and Tanzania, Arts and Letters students spend their summers asking questions and finding answers 

Author: Ashley Lo

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

When summer comes, Notre Dame students travel around the world — to build their language and cultural skills, undertake independent research, and explore career options — growing intellectually and emotionally along the way.  With funding from a wide range of sources, three Arts and Letters students spent last summer researching racism in Paris, interning at the U.S. Embassy in Benin, and speaking Swahili on the streets of Tanzania. Deadlines for applications for summer research, internship, and language immersion funding are fast approaching, with some due at the end of January.

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How a Latino Studies Scholar found his voice at Notre Dame through theology, journalism, and political science 

Author: Ashley Lo

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Junior Aaron Benavides is pursuing faith through service, building community through writing and design, and understanding where in the world he stands through the study of politics and theology. Through all of those activities, on campus and abroad, he is further exploring his heritage — and contemplating its significance. 

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History and pre-health major travels to London to study rare archives of World War I-era surgeries 

Author: Ashley Lo

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Brooke Guenther's research trip — six days at the London Metropolitan Archives, transcribing files from 60 facial reconstruction surgeries performed during and after World War I — was the first to be funded by a grant through the new Medicine and the Liberal Arts program at Notre Dame’s Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values. Guenther is studying Sir Harold Gillies, the father of modern-day plastic surgery, exploring the relationship between patients and the surgeon and studying societal reaction to survivors of wounded veterans who underwent plastic surgery. 

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Through video and book projects, French professor explores why global women writers are gravitating toward Paris

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Alison Rice, an associate professor of French and Francophone studies, conducted 18 filmed interviews in Paris over eight years with authors originally from Iran, Korea, Senegal, and Bulgaria, among other countries. She compiled, edited, and translated the interviews to create an online archive, accessible to scholars and students worldwide, and is now completing a book project based on the interviews.

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Anthropology and peace studies Ph.D. student receives three-year Dolores Zohrab Liebmann Fellowship

Richard “Drew” Marcantonio, a current doctoral student in anthropology and peace studies, has received a prestigious three-year Dolores Zohrab Liebmann Fellowship, enabling his ongoing research on human-produced pollution and environmental violence in the United States and, more broadly, in the global ecosystem.

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The forest and the trees: Arts and Letters research provides complementary angles on childhood adversity

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: Research, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Notre Dame psychologist Kristin Valentino believes that helping kids identify and express their emotions with their mothers helps children to develop emotion regulation and to improve the parent-child relationship. Arts and Letters Dean Sarah Mustillo's research seeks to improve the way adverse childhood experiences predict adverse health issues in adulthood. If Valentino’s project concerns the care of a few hundred trees, Mustillo's study is the 30,000-foot view of the forest. 

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Anthropologist's new book explores generational preconceptions in post-war Sierra Leone

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

In Catherine Bolten’s recently published book, Serious Youth in Sierra Leone, she presents findings on generational preconceptions and their impact on young men in Makeni, Sierra Leone. Her research has implications for everything from development to post-conflict reconstruction to how millennials are perceived and engaged around the world.

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Unearthing the past: Theology graduate students join archaeologists to discover clues from history

Author: Andy Fuller

Categories: Research, Internationalism, Graduate Students, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Over the summer, Notre Dame theology students joined professional archaeologists to look for clues buried in the ancient soil of the Holy Land. What the students found could make valuable contributions to our understanding of life at the border of biblical Judah and Philistia, as well as the history of the land purchased in the 1960s for what became the University's campus here.

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Q&A with Katie Bugyis, assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies

Author: Emily Mahan and Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, Q and A, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

Katie Bugyis, who received a bachelor's degree in history and a Ph.D. in medieval studies from Notre Dame, recently joined the faculty as an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, concurrent assistant professor in the Department of Theology, and faculty fellow of the Medieval Institute. In this Q&A, she discusses her return to Notre Dame, how she became interested in medieval studies, and why the Program of Liberal Studies is the best home for her teaching and research.

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Jason Ruiz, associate professor of American studies, receives 2019 Sheedy Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Jason Ruiz, an associate professor in the Department of American Studies, has won the 2019 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award, the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters. Created in 1970, the Sheedy Award honors Rev. Charles E. Sheedy, C.S.C., who served as dean of Arts and Letters from 1951 to 1969. Ruiz will accept the award at a reception in his honor on December 3. “It means the world to me to be recognized in this way, he said, “especially because the College is full of great teachers I admire.”

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Meeting in the middle: Sociologists, development practitioners share ideas, research at annual conference

Author: Rowland, Ashley

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

A major sociology conference at the University of Notre Dame recently brought together scholars and practitioners for a rare chance to talk about their work and research on a range of development-related topics. “We don’t get this opportunity very often. This is one of the only academic conferences where we can have that dialogue with practitioners,” said sociologist Tamara Kay, one of three faculty members in the Department of Sociology who organized the American Sociological Association’s 8th Annual Sociology of Development Conference, held Oct. 17-19.

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Video: Laura Miller-Graff on interventions for violence on women and children

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Laura Miller-Graff is a Notre Dame assistant professor of psychology and peace studies and core faculty at the William J. Shaw Center for Children and Families. Her research interests include the developmental effects of exposure to violence in childhood, resiliency in children, and interventions for violence-exposed persons. In this video, she discusses how her research helps children and families thrive, even in the wake of considerable hardship.

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Economics students gain hands-on research experience in LEO’s fight against poverty

Author: Leigh Lynes

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Economics students at the University of Notre Dame are contributing to the evidence-based anti-poverty research conducted by Notre Dame economics professors and research faculty at the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO). Through LEO’s internship program, students gain real-life experience in areas such as project management, data collection, statistical and econometric analysis, and research report writing.

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With NSF grant, Notre Dame psychologist develops adaptive testing tool to help high school students increase learning

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Student engagement has long been recognized as key to academic success. Most research, however, has focused on engagement generally, across the school setting. Quantitative psychologist Ying “Alison” Cheng is working to better understand the link between student engagement and learning outcomes in a specific course — and how adaptive testing can help.

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New Notre Dame Technology Ethics Center to address ‘big questions’ of emerging technology

Author: Patrick Gibbons

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

The University of Notre Dame plans to add 15 new faculty positions in its recently established Technology Ethics Center, which aims to address the increasingly complex and continuously evolving ethical and policy questions related to the impact of technology on society and individuals. “Through the work of this new center, Notre Dame has an opportunity to play an important role in ensuring ethical questions are carefully considered throughout the entire innovation and technology development process,” said Sarah Mustillo, the I.A. O’Shaughnessy Dean of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, who has spearheaded the initiative.

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Video: Political scientist Aníbal Pérez Liñán on the survival of democracies

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

“If we want democracy to survive into the next century, then we really need to understand the conditions for that process,” said Aníbal Pérez Liñán, professor of political science and global affairs at the University of Notre Dame. Liñán studies the role of political institutions in the process of democratization, particularly in Latin America. His research finds that political leaders or parties are central to the success of a democracy, as opposed to the economic or structural conditions of a country. 

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Psychologist receives $2.5 million National Institutes of Health grant to launch intervention program for pregnant women exposed to violence

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Laura Miller-Graff, an assistant professor of psychology and peace studies, along with co-principal investigator Kathryn Howell of the University of Memphis and a team of Notre Dame faculty members, will evaluate the intervention program through a randomized, controlled trial involving more than 200 women and their infants.

 

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Luis Fraga, ILS director and political scientist, awarded 2019 Norton Long Career Achievement Award for Politics

Author: Institute for Latino Studies

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Luis Fraga, director of Notre Dame's Institute for Latino Studies, has been selected as the 2019 Norton Long Career Achievement Award winner for his work in political science by a committee of distinguished peers. The award is given each year to a scholar who has made important contributions to the study of urban politics over the course of a career. 

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Video: Chloe Gibbs on the economics of early childhood education

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Chloe Gibbs is an assistant professor of economics and faculty affiliate of Notre Dame's Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities. Her research interests include applied microeconomics, the economics of education, and labor economics. In this video, she discusses why a move to widespread full-day kindergartenten has actually widened achievement gaps among children, and why it's important to study why programs don't work the way they're intended, in order to inform policymakers and school leaders about what they should be doing.

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