Our Experts in the News

Archive

  1. If Trump were to lose again, would he succeed in overturning 2024 election?

    Robert Schmuhl is professor emeritus of American studies at the University of Notre Dame and adjunct professor at Dublin City University.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  2. Pope's recent appointment of women is too little, too late

    Kathleen Sprows Cummings, professor of American Studies and the director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame, called the pope's move "far too little" and "far too late."

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  3. Natural gas strategy tests Europe’s unity against Russia

    “Undoubtedly, there will be intra-European fights and struggles, and that could potentially be severe,” said Rudi Bachmann, a professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  4. Can Deutschland AG cope with the Russian gas shock?

    In typical corporatist fashion, Germany’s big parties, industry bigwigs and trade unions collectively decided that cheap Russian gas was great industrial policy, too, notes Rüdiger Bachmann of the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  5. US, allies aim to cap Russian oil prices to hinder invasion

    In that case, “the main question is will countries have enough time to find alternatives” to prevent massive price increases, said Christiane Baumeister, an economist at the University of Notre Dame who studies the dynamics of energy markets.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  6. The U.S. tries to build support for a price cap on Russian oil

    So far, however, the West has not succeeded in choking off financing for Russia’s war on Ukraine, said Christiane Baumeister of the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  7. Do findings of two new polls show the path where America is headed?

    David Campbell, a political science professor at the University of Notre Dame, had a distinctly different take on the question. Campbell is co-author of both “American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us” and “Secular Surge: A New Fault Line in American Politics.”

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  8. Pope Francis wants two women on the committee that proposes bishops

    Others think the pope’s appointment of women at the Vatican is too little, too late. “Will these new appointees have any actual power?” wondered Kathleen Cummings, professor of American studies at the University of Notre Dame, in a statement on Wednesday (July 6.) 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  9. Opening the Word: Christ, our neighbor

    Catherine Cavadini, Ph.D., is the assistant chair of the Department of Theology and director of the master’s in theology program at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  10. Opening the Word: A loving sacrifice inspired by the Gospel

    Catherine Cavadini, Ph.D., is the assistant chair of the Department of Theology and director of the master’s in theology program at the University of Notre Dame.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  11. What interest rate hikes mean for you and the economy

    “At this point, a hard landing is unavoidable,” Eric Sims, a professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame, told ABC News. “There will be some short-term pain.”

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  12. UK cancels first flight to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda

    “At a global level, this unapologetically punitive deal further condones the evisceration of the right to seek asylum in wealthy countries,” said Maurizio Albahari, a migration expert at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana as he described the UK policy.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  13. We Know How America Got Such a Corporate-Friendly Court

    Patrick Deneen is a professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame. 

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.

  14. US set for recession next year, economists predict

    Further rate rises are also likely well into next year, said Christiane Baumeister, a professor at the University of Notre Dame, who thinks the Fed could lift its benchmark policy rate as high as 4 per cent in 2023.

    Originally published at news.nd.edu.