Office for Undergraduate Studies

Maestrovic sculpture in springtime

Welcome to the Office for Undergraduate Studies. Our goal is to assist both students and faculty—and we encourage you to browse our webpages using the links on the left.

Our team of assistant deans provides a range of services, including orientation, student advising, course scheduling, coordination of the transfer and readmission process, approval for study abroad, advising regarding course completion while abroad, and status certification of undergraduate degrees.

Find Your Advising Dean

To better serve our students, we have adopted a new advising system in which students are assigned a specific assistant dean who will work with them through graduation.

As in the past, Assistant Dean Vicki Toumayan will work with all Pre-health students.

All other students are assigned an assistant dean based on their last names:

  • A–E: Dean Collin Meissner
  • F–K: Dean Nicholas Russo
  • L–Q: Dean Ava Preacher
  • R–Z: Dean Joseph Stanfiel

Additionally, students from any college in the University are invited to consult with Assistant Dean Ava Preacher to prepare for law school, although they should continue to see their assigned adviser for all other matters.

To Serve, Educate, and Empower

The mission of the Office for Undergraduate Studies in the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame is to:

  • serve as a resource for students and for offices in the College and across the University.
  • uphold and maintain the standards inherent in the Academic Code of Honor.
  • empower students to be lifelong, self-directed learners by mentoring students and encouraging them to explore opportunities in research, publication, international education and scholarship and to identify their strengths in considering potential career path.
  • meet students where they are in their respective life journeys.
  • lend encouragement as students progress toward their own life goals.
  • promote an appreciation of collegiate education as an opportunity for exploration, contemplation, and intellectual engagement by providing and directing students to resources.
  • work cooperatively with other campus entities to inspire students to develop ethical standards and values for life.

In sum, our overarching goal is to achieve unsurpassed excellence in the guidance and nurturing of undergraduate students during their intellectual and spiritual journeys as members of the Notre Dame community.


Office for
Undergraduate Studies

Location: 104 O’Shaughnessy Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556
Hours: 8 am-€“5 pm
Walk-ins: MWF from 1:30 pm-€“4 pm and TTh from 9 am-€“11 am
Appointments: Call 574.631.7098


Own Your Education


Map Your Own Path

Three-year plan icon


Curious about Senior Thesis?

Check out some of our highlighted senior thesis projects!

Arts and Letters News

  • Tea Party Support Linked to Educational Segregation, New Study Shows

    tea_party_2010_icon

    In January 2009, Barack Obama assumed the U.S. presidency in the midst of the most severe recession since the great depression of the 1930s. While many Americans hoped the new administration would take an active role in providing relief for those harmed by the economic collapse, a “Tea Party” movement emerged to oppose Obama’s agenda. Read More >

  • ND Experts: No Excuse for Malaysia Airlines 'Mistaken Identity'

    Michael Desch

    President Barack Obama on Friday (July 18) began building a case that would blame separatist forces supported by Russia for the downing of the Malaysia Airlines passenger jet over Ukraine on July 17. Obama said one American was among the nearly 300 killed and that evidence indicates the jet was shot down by a surface-to-air missile from an area controlled by Russian-backed separatists. Read More >

  • Theology Professor Awarded Two Prestigious Research Grants

    Peter Casarella

    Peter Casarella, associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Theology, has been awarded two prestigious grants for a book project that will explore the idea of God from the perspective of Latino Catholicism, including the complex challenges of “translating” God in a modern world. Read More >

  • New Book Warns of Dangers to Humanitarian Aid Workers

    Larissa Fast hp crop

    The title of Notre Dame sociologist Larissa Fast’s new book, Aid in Danger, has a double meaning. The first is that humanitarian workers around the globe are at greater risk than ever of being attacked, injured, kidnapped, or killed. The second is that as aid agencies provide increasingly sophisticated security for workers—often isolating them from the populations they serve—they risk compromising the essence of humanitarian aid: a relationship formed when one human being relieves the suffering of another. Read More >