Fellowship Record

The ongoing scholarship of the College’s faculty has a strong record of attracting research funding from private foundations, corporations, and the federal government. Over the past decade, the number of faculty who have received major national fellowships in the arts, humanities, and social sciences places us among the top six universities in the nation. Our faculty has also had record success with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Fellowships Awarded by the
National Endowment for the Humanities

1999–2014

  1. University of Notre Dame – 51
  2. University of Michigan – 36
  3. Harvard University – 28
  4. Princeton University – 24
  5. University of California, Berkeley – 21


Fellowships Awarded to Liberal Arts Faculty at
Top 25 National Research Universities

1999–2013

  1. Princeton University – 190
  2. Harvard University – 185
  3. University of Michigan – 184
  4. University of Chicago – 171
  5. University of California, Berkeley – 166
  6. University of Notre Dame – 152
  7. Columbia University – 149
  8. Northwestern University – 131
  9. University of Pennsylvania – 127
  10. Yale University – 107
  11. Duke University – 107
  12. Stanford University – 104
  13. Brown University – 104
  14. University of Virginia – 97
  15. Georgetown University – 90
  16. Cornell University – 84
  17. Vanderbilt University – 76
  18. Washington University in St. Louis – 75
  19. Emory University – 74
  20. Johns Hopkins University – 58
  21. Dartmouth University – 57
  22. Massachusetts Institute of Technology – 48
  23. Rice University – 42
  24. Carnegie Mellon University – 19
  25. California Institute of Technology – 14


Note: All fellowship numbers are taken from the fellowship lists provided by the funding agencies. Fellowship granting agencies are those used by the National Research Council in its rankings for the humanities. The Top 25 national research universities are from the U.S. News rankings (September 2003). The statistics include only faculty (rather than dissertation or pre-doctoral) fellowships. They also include only fellowships given to faculty in departments equivalent to those in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters (humanities, arts, and social sciences). Fellowships awarded to scientists and engineers were excluded for the purpose of comparing Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters to other universities. The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford has not until recently made its fellowship lists public. Including those numbers could change the rankings slightly.


Research in the Humanities


Faculty News

  • New Sociology Professor Focuses on Social Side of Child Mental Health Issues

    Sociologist Sarah Mustillo ’96 combines real-world experience and statistical expertise to explore the social origins of child mental health issues. This fall she returned to Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters to continue her innovative research as a professor in the Department of Sociology. Read More >

  • In Memoriam: Remie Constable, Director of Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute

    Olivia Remie Constable, Robert M. Conway Director of the Medieval Institute and professor of history at the University of Notre Dame, died of cancer at home Wednesday (April 16). A member of the Notre Dame faculty since 1995, Constable had directed the Medieval Institute since 2009. Read More >

  • Notre Dame Theologians Explore Life, Death, and Resurrection in Rwanda

    The genocide in Rwanda, whose 20th anniversary is being observed worldwide this month, began only a few days after Easter. That the hatred that cost the lives of a million people in this overwhelmingly Christian country could be unleashed so near to Holy Week seems paradoxical, ironic, or even blasphemous. But for Jean Bosco Rutagengwa, it is most of all a searing mystery. “This country went through what Jesus Christ went through,” he says of his homeland. “Life, death, and resurrection.” Read More >

  • Anthropologist Maurizio Albahari Illuminates Migration Crisis in the Mediterranean

    “Everything changed on October 3, but nothing really changed,” says Maurizio Albahari, assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology. In October 2013, several major media outlets covered two tragic shipwrecks off the coast of the Sicilian island of Lampedusa, which killed more than 400 Eritrean and Syrian migrants trying to reach Europe. Following the first incident, CNN reached out to Albahari for a quote. Read More >