Fellowship Record

The ongoing scholarship of the College’s faculty has a strong record of attracting research funding from private foundations, corporations, and the federal government. Over the past 16 years, the number of faculty who have received major national fellowships in the arts, humanities, and social sciences places us among the Top 5 private research universities in the nation. Our faculty has also had record success with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Fellowships Awarded by the
National Endowment for the Humanities


  1. University of Notre Dame – 53
  2. University of Michigan – 36
  3. Harvard University – 29
  4. Princeton University – 25
  5. University of California, Berkeley – 23

Fellowships Awarded to Liberal Arts Faculty at
Leading Private Research Universities


  1. Princeton University – 206
  2. Harvard University – 198
  3. University of Chicago – 180
  4. Columbia University – 163
  5. University of Notre Dame – 161
  6. Northwestern University – 136
  7. University of Pennsylvania – 133
  8. Brown University – 113
  9. Duke University – 111
  10. Stanford University – 108
  11. Yale University – 108
  12. Georgetown University – 92
  13. Cornell University – 91
  14. Emory University – 81
  15. Washington University in St. Louis – 80

Note: All fellowship numbers are taken from the fellowship lists provided by the funding agencies. Fellowship granting agencies are those used by the National Research Council in its rankings for the humanities. The statistics include only faculty (rather than dissertation or pre-doctoral) fellowships. They also include only fellowships given to faculty in departments equivalent to those in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters (humanities, arts, and social sciences). Fellowships awarded to scientists and engineers were excluded for the purpose of comparing Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters to other universities. The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford has not until recently made its fellowship lists public. Including those numbers could change the rankings slightly.

Research in the Humanities

Arts and Letters News

  • Arts and Letters Graduate Emmie Mediate Named Rhodes Scholar

    Emily Mediate

    Emmie Mediate, a 2015 graduate of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, has been selected to the American Rhodes Scholar Class of 2016. A native of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Mediate was one of 32 Rhodes Scholars selected from a pool of 869 candidates who had been nominated by their colleges and universities. She is Notre Dame’s 17th Rhodes Scholar and the University’s second in two years. Read More >

  • The Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival Announces its 2016 Season, Audition Dates

    Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival

    The Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival (NDSF) has announced the titles and audition dates for its upcoming 2016 summer season. In order to explore and celebrate Shakespeare’s final plays, NDSF has selected two works that embody the playwright’s voice at the close of his career. The 2016 season is named “Shakespeare’s Last Words” and will feature adventure, exhilaration, and redemption. Read More >

  • Marie Kissel ’83 on Study Abroad and the Liberal Arts as a Foundation for an International Career

    Marie Kissel

    Marie Kissel ’83 traces much of her success back to one key point in her Notre Dame experience: going overseas to Tokyo as an undergraduate. “I’ve got this great job, I’m in a region that’s very exciting—that would not have happened without my opportunities at Notre Dame, especially through the study abroad programs,” she said. Kissel is now vice president for government affairs for Asia at Abbott Laboratories, a global pharmaceuticals and health care products company. Read More >

  • Anthropologists’ Research Finds Emotionally Supportive Relationships Linked to Lower Testosterone


    Science and folklore alike have long suggested that high levels of testosterone can facilitate the sorts of attitudes and behavior that make for, well, a less than ideal male parent. It has long been known that among humans (and some other species as well), males who cooperate amicably with their female mates in raising and nurturing offspring often have lower testosterone levels than their more aggressive and occasionally grumpy counterparts. But two University of Notre Dame anthropologists are looking beyond the nuclear family for such effects. Read More >