Fellowship Record

The ongoing scholarship of the College’s faculty has a strong record of attracting research funding from private foundations, corporations, and the federal government. Over the past decade, the number of faculty who have received major national fellowships in the arts, humanities, and social sciences places us among the top six universities in the nation. Our faculty has also had record success with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Fellowships Awarded by the
National Endowment for the Humanities

1999–2014

  1. University of Notre Dame – 51
  2. University of Michigan – 36
  3. Harvard University – 28
  4. Princeton University – 24
  5. University of California, Berkeley – 21


Fellowships Awarded to Liberal Arts Faculty at
Top 25 National Research Universities

1999–2013

  1. Princeton University – 190
  2. Harvard University – 185
  3. University of Michigan – 184
  4. University of Chicago – 171
  5. University of California, Berkeley – 166
  6. University of Notre Dame – 152
  7. Columbia University – 149
  8. Northwestern University – 131
  9. University of Pennsylvania – 127
  10. Yale University – 107
  11. Duke University – 107
  12. Stanford University – 104
  13. Brown University – 104
  14. University of Virginia – 97
  15. Georgetown University – 90
  16. Cornell University – 84
  17. Vanderbilt University – 76
  18. Washington University in St. Louis – 75
  19. Emory University – 74
  20. Johns Hopkins University – 58
  21. Dartmouth University – 57
  22. Massachusetts Institute of Technology – 48
  23. Rice University – 42
  24. Carnegie Mellon University – 19
  25. California Institute of Technology – 14


Note: All fellowship numbers are taken from the fellowship lists provided by the funding agencies. Fellowship granting agencies are those used by the National Research Council in its rankings for the humanities. The Top 25 national research universities are from the U.S. News rankings (September 2003). The statistics include only faculty (rather than dissertation or pre-doctoral) fellowships. They also include only fellowships given to faculty in departments equivalent to those in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters (humanities, arts, and social sciences). Fellowships awarded to scientists and engineers were excluded for the purpose of comparing Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters to other universities. The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford has not until recently made its fellowship lists public. Including those numbers could change the rankings slightly.


Research in the Humanities


Faculty News

  • Tea Party Support Linked to Educational Segregation, New Study Shows

    tea_party_2010_icon

    In January 2009, Barack Obama assumed the U.S. presidency in the midst of the most severe recession since the great depression of the 1930s. While many Americans hoped the new administration would take an active role in providing relief for those harmed by the economic collapse, a “Tea Party” movement emerged to oppose Obama’s agenda. Read More >

  • ND Experts: No Excuse for Malaysia Airlines 'Mistaken Identity'

    Michael Desch

    President Barack Obama on Friday (July 18) began building a case that would blame separatist forces supported by Russia for the downing of the Malaysia Airlines passenger jet over Ukraine on July 17. Obama said one American was among the nearly 300 killed and that evidence indicates the jet was shot down by a surface-to-air missile from an area controlled by Russian-backed separatists. Read More >

  • Theology Professor Awarded Two Prestigious Research Grants

    Peter Casarella

    Peter Casarella, associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Theology, has been awarded two prestigious grants for a book project that will explore the idea of God from the perspective of Latino Catholicism, including the complex challenges of “translating” God in a modern world. Read More >

  • New Book Warns of Dangers to Humanitarian Aid Workers

    Larissa Fast hp crop

    The title of Notre Dame sociologist Larissa Fast’s new book, Aid in Danger, has a double meaning. The first is that humanitarian workers around the globe are at greater risk than ever of being attacked, injured, kidnapped, or killed. The second is that as aid agencies provide increasingly sophisticated security for workers—often isolating them from the populations they serve—they risk compromising the essence of humanitarian aid: a relationship formed when one human being relieves the suffering of another. Read More >