Fellowship Record

The ongoing scholarship of the College’s faculty has a strong record of attracting research funding from private foundations, corporations, and the federal government. Over the past decade, the number of faculty who have received major national fellowships in the arts, humanities, and social sciences places us among the top six universities in the nation. Our faculty has also had record success with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Fellowships Awarded by the
National Endowment for the Humanities

1999–2014

  1. University of Notre Dame – 51
  2. University of Michigan – 36
  3. Harvard University – 28
  4. Princeton University – 24
  5. University of California, Berkeley – 21


Fellowships Awarded to Liberal Arts Faculty at
Top 25 National Research Universities

1999–2013

  1. Princeton University – 190
  2. Harvard University – 185
  3. University of Michigan – 184
  4. University of Chicago – 171
  5. University of California, Berkeley – 166
  6. University of Notre Dame – 152
  7. Columbia University – 149
  8. Northwestern University – 131
  9. University of Pennsylvania – 127
  10. Yale University – 107
  11. Duke University – 107
  12. Stanford University – 104
  13. Brown University – 104
  14. University of Virginia – 97
  15. Georgetown University – 90
  16. Cornell University – 84
  17. Vanderbilt University – 76
  18. Washington University in St. Louis – 75
  19. Emory University – 74
  20. Johns Hopkins University – 58
  21. Dartmouth University – 57
  22. Massachusetts Institute of Technology – 48
  23. Rice University – 42
  24. Carnegie Mellon University – 19
  25. California Institute of Technology – 14


Note: All fellowship numbers are taken from the fellowship lists provided by the funding agencies. Fellowship granting agencies are those used by the National Research Council in its rankings for the humanities. The Top 25 national research universities are from the U.S. News rankings (September 2003). The statistics include only faculty (rather than dissertation or pre-doctoral) fellowships. They also include only fellowships given to faculty in departments equivalent to those in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters (humanities, arts, and social sciences). Fellowships awarded to scientists and engineers were excluded for the purpose of comparing Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters to other universities. The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford has not until recently made its fellowship lists public. Including those numbers could change the rankings slightly.


Research in the Humanities


Faculty News

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    Beginning in fall 2014, Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and College of Science will offer a collaborative major in neuroscience and behavior, which will include both Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science tracks. Read More >

  • ND Expert: Chinese Government Threatened by Christianity

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    Government authorities in southeast China are continuing what local church leaders call a campaign against Christianity—knocking down crosses and razing sanctuaries at dozens of churches in the Zhejiang province. Christianity has grown so rapidly, it’s viewed as a threat by the Communist government, according to Lionel Jensen, associate professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Notre Dame. Read More >

  • Video: Mary Celeste Kearney on Filmmaking and Girls' Media Culture

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    “The world of filmmaking and television production is dominated by men’s voices. We are not seeing enough representations that are actually from a girl or a woman’s perspective,” said Mary Celeste Kearney, associate professor of film, television, and theatre and a senior fellow in the gender studies program at the University of Notre Dame. Read More >

  • Tea Party Support Linked to Educational Segregation, New Study Shows

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    In January 2009, Barack Obama assumed the U.S. presidency in the midst of the most severe recession since the great depression of the 1930s. While many Americans hoped the new administration would take an active role in providing relief for those harmed by the economic collapse, a “Tea Party” movement emerged to oppose Obama’s agenda. Read More >