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Record Fulbright Award Year Led by 15 Arts and Letters Students

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Fifteen Notre Dame students who studied in the College of Arts and Letters have received grants from the Fulbright program, the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program. A total of 18 students were named Fulbright finalists—the most grantees the University has ever had in the program.

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White House Report on Juvenile Offender Diversion Programs Highlights Project with LEO Ties

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, and Research

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A White House Council of Economic Advisers report released July 14 includes an account of Reading for Life, a local juvenile diversion program that is being evaluated by the University of Notre Dame’s Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities. The report, “Economic Costs of Youth Disadvantage and High-Return Opportunities for Change,” features the RFL program, which has been used at the St. Joseph County Juvenile Justice Center since 2007.

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Two Romance Languages and Literatures Graduates Receive Fulbright Awards to Study Global Nutrition

Christina Gutierrez and Claire Donovan icon

Two recent Notre Dame graduates are tackling global health issues with support from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. French and Francophone studies major Claire Donovan will work with UNICEF in Togo to examine women’s adherence to micronutrient supplement programs. Christina Gutierrez, who majored in Romance languages and literatures and political science, will pursue a master’s degree at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy and conduct research on and pilot a food co-op concept there.

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LEO Receives $435,000 NIH Grant to Study Impact of Community College Intervention Program

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

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Notre Dame’s Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities has received a $435,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health for a two-year study of Stay the Course, a program designed to keep low-income community college students on the path to academic success. Participants are paired with a case manager who offers guidance and support on how to stay on track to graduate or transfer to a four-year college. They are also directed to affordable child care or other social services that will aid them in their pursuit of an education.

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Researchers in New Notre Dame Center Awarded $3.1 Million Grant to Study Virtues in Science

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Celia Deane-Drummond

A team of researchers in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters has been awarded a $3.1 million grant from the Templeton Religion Trust to examine how the concrete practices of science relate to something more abstract—what theologians and philosophers consider “virtues”—and how that connects with other areas of scientists’ lives, including their religious beliefs. The endeavor is a key component of Notre Dame’s new Center for Theology, Science, and Human Flourishing, which will serve as a hub for transdisciplinary research at the University.

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The Art of Truth: Maxim Kantor

Author: Andy Fuller

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Maxim Kantor

Maxim Kantor is the portrait of a character from a well-crafted Hollywood political drama: an artist, writer, and philosopher whose early work went largely unnoticed in Cold War Russia because it did not conform to the tastes of the Soviet regime. Notre Dame’s Institute for Advanced Study hosted the artist as its Director’s Fellow in 2015.

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Video: Theologian Gary Knoppers on the Origins of an International Judaism

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Gary Knoppers

“Different texts speak with different voices. Paying attention to these differences between different writings really helps to illumine the history of early Judaism,” said Gary Knoppers, John A. O’Brien Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. Knoppers, whose research focuses on ancient Israelite history, is currently writing commentaries of 2 Chronicles and 1 and 2 Kings, Biblical texts authored during the Babylonian exile.

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Philosopher Honored for Research on Immanuel Kant

Author: John Slott

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Karl Ameriks

Karl Ameriks, the McMahon-Hank Professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame, was honored by the American Philosophy Association as the 2014–15 lecturer for its Walter de Gruyter Stiftung Kant Lecture Series. The distinction, granted to one scholar per year, recognizes an individual whose work includes “a broad approach to Kantian philosophy across the philosophical disciplines.”

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Historian’s Award-Winning Book Offers New View of Turbulent Times for Mexico

Author: John Slott

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Jaime Pensado

Notre Dame historian Jaime M. Pensado has been awarded the Conference on Latin American History’s 2014 Mexican History Book Prize for his first book, Rebel Mexico: Student Unrest and Authoritarian Political Culture During the Long Sixties. An unprecedented look at student activism in 1960s Mexico, the book was judged to be the most significant work on the history of Mexico published in 2014.

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Video: Economist Ruediger Bachmann on the Causality of Uncertainty

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Ruediger Bachmann

“Does uncertainty drive the business cycle or vice versa: does the business cycle actually cause uncertainty?” said Ruediger Bachmann, associate professor of economics at Notre Dame. Bachmann specializes in the macroeconomics of heterogenous agents. He serves as an associate editor for the Economic Journal and as a member of the executive committee of the German Economic Association. He has done extensive work on economic uncertainty and helped establish its counter-cyclical connection to the business cycle, Bachmann says, as a “new business cycle fact.”

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Exhibit Showcases Medieval Liturgical and Musical Manuscripts

Author: Carol C. Bradley

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

David Gura

Sacred Music at Notre Dame: The Voice of the Text, an exhibition in the Hesburgh Libraries Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, highlights the University’s holdings in medieval liturgical manuscripts that contain music. The manuscripts from the 11th through 15th centuries originate from various regions in France, Germany, Austria, and Italy. They inclued a a psalter, a liturgical calendar, a gradual, and a diurnal.

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Video: French and History Major Researches Diderot in Paris

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

Anne Seul icon

Anne Seul ’15, a history and French major, spent the summer of 2014 conducting research at the Bibliotheque Historique de la Ville de Paris, the French capital’s historical library. Her research focused on perceptions of Denis Diderot, the 18th-century French philosopher best known as the chief editor of Encyclopédie and a key figure influencing the French Revolution. “It’s a new challenge. I’ve never done anything remotely like this by myself—living on my own and being in charge of this big project,” she said.

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Professor Strives to Build World-Class Islamic Studies Program

Ebrahim E

For Ebrahim Moosa, the chance to develop an elite Islamic studies program at a Catholic university is full of opportunity. “Catholics and Muslims can potentially embark on a series of meaningful conversations on common concerns,” he said. “There are challenges both Catholics and Muslims face on gender issues, science, evolution, and values. How do strong religious values survive in the midst of formidable social and political challenges?

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Psychology Professor Seeks to Understand How Students Learn Mathematics

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Nicole McNeil

It’s both the bane of many parents and what has been called a major national vulnerability: the inability of many children to learn mathematics. Understanding that problem and developing strategies to overcome it is the research focus of Nicole McNeil, Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame, and the researchers in her lab.

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New Sleep-enhancing App, Tools Based on Notre Dame Psychologist’s Research

Author: Gene Stowe

Categories: Alumni, Faculty News, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

Jessica Payne

A team of Notre Dame entrepreneurs has developed a sleep-enhancing kit and app designed to boost college students’ healthy rest, memory, learning, and mental health. The approach is based on the research of Associate Professor Jessica Payne, the Nancy O’Neill Collegiate Chair in Psychology and director of the Sleep, Stress, and Memory Lab.

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Sociology Majors Set Sights on Business Careers

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Alumni, Centers and Institutes, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

Sarah Hart

With her Notre Dame sociology degree in hand, Sarah Hart ’15 is headed for the business world. When she starts work as a project manager at Epic, a software development company in the health care industry, her major has her set to succeed in a corporate environment. “It’s definitely given me a wide range of skills that can be applied to almost anything,” Hart said.

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Anthropologist and Theologian Awarded $1.8 Million Grant to Study Human Distinctiveness

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Celia Deane-Drummond

With a $1.8 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation, two Notre Dame professors will co-direct the Human Distinctiveness Project, seeking to advance research at the intersection of theology and evolutionary anthropology. The three-year project will support training for theologians in evolutionary and archaeological anthropology, as well as research on the evolution of wisdom.

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Anthropology Major Alexis Palá Awarded Fulbright for Research in Chile

Alexis Pala icon

Anthropology major Alexis Palá has spent the past three years studying opportunities for adults with intellectual disabilities in Chile and Spain. Next year, she will continue her research in Chile with support from a Fulbright U.S. Student Award.

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Anthropology Ph.D. Program Establishes Strong Reputation in First Year

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, and Research

Ian Kuijt icon

Under the leadership of Ian Kuijt, director of graduate studies, seven first-year Ph.D. students encountered a curriculum focused on integrative anthropology—studying approaches and methods across a range of subfields. Next year, the program will add six students, who chose Notre Dame over several other elite institutions.

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Sociology Course Helps Students Prepare for International Field Research

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

Erin Metz McDonnell icon

Undergraduate research projects are transformed from broad ideas to focused realities in International Research Design, a new course in the Department of Sociology developed by Erin Metz McDonnell. Offered for the first time this spring, the class covered the fundamental elements of an international research project, from conception to execution.

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Sociology Ph.D. Student Wins SSRC, Fulbright Grants for Brazil Research

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Stefanie Israel, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology, has been awarded a Social Science Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship to support her comparative ethnography of four “pacified” favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Earlier this year, she was awarded a Fulbright Study-Research Grant for the same project. The funding will allow Israel to spend all of 2016 conducting research in Rio. She will observe urban reform efforts in favela communities at a key point in time: before, during, and after the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, which have been a focus of protests sweeping across Brazil.

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Aspiring Doctor Draws on Anthropology Background in Global Health Fellowship

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Alumni, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Patrick Salemme icon

Patrick Salemme ’14 went to Mexico to make an impact on global health. Once he got there, his experience in the College of Arts and Letters helped him determine how he could do the most good. The anthropology and Arts and Letters pre-health major deferred his entry into medical school in order to spend a year in Chiapas, Mexico—a mountainous, coffee-farming region where more than half the residents live below the poverty line.

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English Major Austin Hagwood Follows Research Interests Around the World

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

Austin Hagwood icon

English major Austin Hagwood ’15 doesn’t dream small. He took a train past the Arctic Circle to meet the only living Finnish rune singer. He interned in Paris at the Shakespeare and Company bookstore. He taught English courses at Al-Azhar University in Egypt. He ventured to New Zealand to research Maori folklore and literature. And that’s not all.

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Notre Dame Researcher Awarded $3.5 Million Grant to Develop Better Understanding of Students' Mathematical Achievement

Author: William Schmitt

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Nicole McNeil

Nicole McNeil, Notre Dame’s ACE Associate Professor of Psychology—along with her colleagues at the nonprofit research agency West Ed—received a $3.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences, which aims to improve students’ mathematical achievement in elementary school and beyond. The grant will allow a large-scale trial of an educational intervention McNeil and her CLAD Lab research team have developed to boost math learning by helping students grasp the concept of mathematical equivalence.

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Kellogg Announces International Development Fellowships to Graduating Seniors

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The Kellogg Institute for International Studies has named five graduating seniors—all of whom have majors or minors in the College of Arts and Letters—as recipients of its International Development Fellowships (IDF) for the coming year. Members of the Notre Dame Class of 2015 Megan Fuerst, Matthew Hing, Emily Mediate, Chris Newton, and Laura Zillmer will work with four partner organizations across the developing world in the second year of the recently expanded program.

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Arts and Letters Students Receive Undergraduate Library Research Awards

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Four University of Notre Dame students—including three from the College of Arts and Letters—received an Undergraduate Library Research Award (ULRA) for their exemplary research skills during a special event at the eighth annual Undergraduate Scholars Conference on May 1. More than 80 undergraduate research and scholarship projects were showcased at the conference.

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Turner, Berends, and Cheng Named to Lead American Educational Research Journal

Author: William Schmitt

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Julianne Turner

Julie Turner, associate professor of psychology and fellow of the Institute for Educational Initiatives, has been named the new lead editor of the American Educational Research Association’s (AERAAmerican Educational Research Journal. Two other institute fellows—Mark Berends, distinguished sociologist of education and director of the Center for Research on Educational Opportunity (CREO), and Alison Cheng, associate professor of psychology—will work with Turner as a co-editor and an associate editor, respectively.

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Notre Dame Sociologists Receive Grant to Research Indiana School Choice

Author: William Schmitt

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Megan Andrew

New research at the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Research on Educational Opportunity will focus on the implications of Indiana’s school choice laws on students’ friendships and achievements. Notre Dame sociologists Megan Andrew and Jennifer Flashman have received a $600,000 grant from the W.T. Grant Foundation and a $50,000 grant from the Spencer Foundation. They will collect and evaluate new data about middle school students in Indiana, which is known for its robust school choice programs.

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Anthropologist Meredith Chesson Awarded NEH Grant

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Anthropologist Meredith Chesson in the field

Meredith Chesson, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology, has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to continue fieldwork in Italy’s Bova Marina region. Her project—examining how human landscapes of the Mediterranean have changed over millennia—is an outgrowth of 18 years of research by the Bova Marina Archaeological Project (BMAP). The project is co-directed by Chesson, John Robb of the University of Cambridge, and Lin Foxhall of the University of Leicester, working under the auspices of the Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici della Calabria.

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Anthropologist Focuses on Cultural Poetics

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Arts, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Alex Chavez

Furiously strumming his jarana into the early morning hours of a stranger’s backyard birthday party in Austin, Texas, Alex Chavez was having fun with the hired musicians who had brought him along as an impromptu guest. He was also doing fieldwork. Chavez, who joined Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology in 2014 as an assistant professor, studies “the aesthetic dimensions of contemporary lived politics”— sometimes referred to as cultural poetics. He focuses on the unfolding of this expressive grammar among Latino migrant communities in the United States.

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