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Notre Dame and Sprint To Study Wireless and Social Networking Habits

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Does mobile technology actually help students to learn to better express themselves and ultimately enhance their face-to-face interactions? This is one of many questions that sociologists David Hachen and Omar Lizardo will try to answer as part of a pioneering three-year study by the University of Notre Dame’s Wireless Institute.

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Economist Abigail Wozniak Studies Decline in Long-Distance Moves

Author: Susan Guibert and Paul Murphy

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

While Americans have a storied past with internal migration dating back hundreds of years, the number of people relocating within the U.S. has dropped to a 30-year low. University of Notre Dame economist Abigail Wozniak, together with Raven Molloy and Christopher Smith of the Federal Reserve, reviewed 30 years of data and found that the recent slump in the housing market and economic conditions play little part in the decline.

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Project Studies Effectiveness of Mediation in Custody Disputes

Author: Renee Hochstetler

Categories: General News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

A joint project between the Law School’s legal aid clinic and the College of Arts and Letters’ Center for Children and Families will examine the effectiveness of mediation in child custody disputes—specifically the success of educational programs required by the courts and whether the type of mediation makes a difference.

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Study Links Cell Phone Usage and Relationship Strength

Author: Renee Hochstetler

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

A project on the dynamics of social networks at the University of Notre Dame’s Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications (iCeNSA) has found a link between cell phone usage and relationship strength. To conduct the study, sociologists David Hachen and Omar Lizardo collaborated with faculty members from the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics, the Department of Computer Science, and the Department of Physics.

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Anthropologist Catherine Bolten Reveals Human Side of Sierra Leone

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

An army officer betrayed by the government and put on trial for a treasonous crime he didn’t commit. A market trader who forges an alliance with a rebel leader in order to feed her starving children. And a man who almost gets himself killed several times in order to get food for his pregnant wife. These are among the scores of survivors Notre Dame anthropologist Catherine Bolten came to know during more than seven years researching post–war Sierra Leone.

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Research on Christian School Graduates Yields Surprising Results

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

In the first study of its kind on K-12 Christian education in North America, University of Notre Dame sociologist David Sikkink, in partnership with Cardus—a public policy think tank—found that while Protestant Christian school graduates show uncommon commitment to their families and churches, donate more money than graduates of other schools, and divorce less, they also have lower incomes, less education, and are less engaged in politics than their Catholic and non-religious private school peers.

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Ph.D. Student Examines Animal Imagery in Literature

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

Damiano Benvegnù, a student in Notre Dame’s Ph.D. in Literature Program, can point to the moment when he changed his academic focus from astronomy to literature. “Reading William Blake’s ‘Tyger’ in a literature class in my liceo scientifico (high school) was an epiphany. The poem was an amazing feat for Blake in the late 18th century—and then a revelation for me, as a reader, more than 200 years later.”

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Christian Davenport Examines Untold Stories of Northern Ireland’s “Troubles”

“Most people who are interested in the Troubles focus on the 4,000 deaths,” says Christian Davenport, professor of peace studies, political science and sociology at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. “I thought much of the story was being missed.” An expert on political conflict, human rights violations, genocide, and government repression, Davenport for the past five years has been using quantitative research methods to study the ethno-political conflict that took place in Northern Ireland between 1968 and 1998.

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Abandoned Irish Island Offers a Window to the Past

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The last 24 human inhabitants of the Irish island of Inishark departed together on October 20, 1960—a solemn end to a slow, steady decline. This small community’s collapse more than 50 years ago now offers Anthropology Professor Ian Kuijt and his students “a window” to Irish life in the 19th century. “These people were living little differently than they were in the 1860s,” he explains.

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Ph.D. Student Analyzes Religion’s Influence on War and Peace

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Catholicism

No one would dispute that religious convictions can lead to conflict—even violence and war. Yet how is it that so often adversaries use their faith to justify opposing stances in the same dispute? That’s the question that intrigues Christopher Morrissey, a doctoral candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology.

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Doctoral Student Researches Violence in Guatemala

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

For the first time since their discovery in 2005, archival records chronicling police violence during the Guatemalan Civil War have been made available to academic researchers. And Ph.D. candidate Christopher Sullivan has become one of the first scholars to investigate the collection of more than 80 million documents at the National Police Archives in Guatemala City.

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Sociologist Christian Smith’s Book Wins International Prize

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Notre Dame sociologist Christian Smith’s latest book is one of two winners of the 2010 Cheryl Frank Memorial Prize from the International Association for Critical Realism (IACR). What is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up (University of Chicago Press) presents a new model for social theory that embraces the best of our humanistic visions of people, life, and society.

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Graduate Student Examines History of Native American Policies

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News and Research

Although talk of extinction is often focused on plant and animal life, graduate student Myles Beaupre is researching what it means when extinction applies to an entire race of people. Beaupre, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History, is studying government policies on Native Americans throughout the development of the United States—from the British Empire-controlled colonies to the mid- to late-1800s of the newly formed country.

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