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MurphyKate Montee Named a 2013-2014 Churchill Scholar

Author: Stephanie Healey

Categories: National Fellowships, General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Arts

The Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States has selected MurphyKate Montee as a Churchill Scholar for the academic year 2013-2014. Montee, a senior mathematics and music (voice) double major in the Glynn Family Honors Program, is one of just 14 students in the United States to receive this honor.

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New Research: Mali Villagers Say Basic Humanitarian Relief Most Important

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

As French forces continue battling Islamist militants in Mali and the international policy community debates additional foreign intervention, the voices of those most affected by this political instability are rarely heard—until now. University of Notre Dame Political Scientist Jaimie Bleck, who specializes in Malian politics, has completed extensive research in Mali where she interviewed some 600 Malian villagers living on the border of rebel-claimed territory.

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New ND Report Finds Catholics Less Generous Than Other Christians

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Catholics are less generous than other American Christians, according to a study recently published by the University of Notre Dame’s Catholic Social and Pastoral Research Initiative (CSPRI). “Unleashing Catholic Generosity: Explaining the Catholic Giving Gap in the United States,” by Brian Starks, director of CSPRI, and Christian Smith, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology at Notre Dame, compares the religious giving of Catholics with that of other religious communities in America and concludes that Catholics, on average, give less than other Christians.

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Video: Historian Daniel Hobbins on the Great Age of Books

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

University of Notre Dame Associate Professor Daniel Hobbins is a historian of high and late medieval Europe, with a particular interest in the cultural and intellectual history of the period from 1300 to 1500. Under this broad heading, his research has focused on late medieval authorship (through the example of Jean Gerson), Joan of Arc, and backgrounds to print. In this video, Hobbins discusses his research on the tremendous changes in book production in the late Middle Ages, before the advent of print.

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Video: Notre Dame Economist Timothy Fuerst on Policy Questions and Economic Modeling

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

“If you only like philosophy, then be a philosopher. If you only like history, then be a historian. If you only like mathematics, then be a mathematician. But if you like all of those things, you should be an economist,” says Timothy S. Fuerst, the William and Dorothy O’Neill Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame. One of the most-cited economists in the world, Fuerst also serves as senior economic advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. His research interests include monetary theory and policy, with a special focus on business cycles.

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Professor Sandra Gustafson Awarded NEH Fellowship

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Sandra M. Gustafson, professor of English and concurrent professor of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame, has been awarded a prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) fellowship to write a book on conflict and democracy in classic American novels. Faculty in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters Notre Dame have been awarded 49 NEH fellowships between 1999 and 2013—more than any other university in the country.

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Notre Dame Unveils Major New Archive in Russian History

Author: Anthony Monta

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Thanks to the efforts of Semion Lyandres, an associate professor in the Department of History, and crucial seed funding from the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, Notre Dame has now unveiled a significant archive of primary documents that shed new light on the origins of modern Russia.

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Senior Takes Advantage of International Research Opportunities

Author: Nancy Joyce

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

What do Sierra Leone, Croatia, and Ireland have in common? All are the subject of University of Notre Dame senior Catherine Reidy’s undergraduate research. Reidy, a psychology major and anthropology minor in the College of Arts and Letters, spent the past two summers collecting ethnographic research data in Makeni, Sierra Leone.

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REM Sleep Enhances Emotional Memories, Study Shows

Categories: General News and Research

In a new study published recently in Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, University of Notre Dame psychology researchers Jessica Payne and Alexis Chambers found that people who experienced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep soon after being presented with an emotionally-charged negative scene—a wrecked car on a street, for example—had superior memory for the emotional object compared to subjects whose sleep was delayed for at least 16 hours.

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Notre Dame Announces New Ph.D. Program in Anthropology

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News and Research

The University of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters will launch a doctoral program in the Department of Anthropology, with the first cohort of students due to enroll in fall 2014. The new program, says Susan Blum, professor and chair of the department, will focus its curriculum and training on integrative anthropology.

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Psychology Professor Seeks Clues to Psychiatric Disorders in DNA

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Data, data everywhere. In genomics research, there is a data deluge, and so innovative ways to analyze all that information will play a critical role in future breakthroughs. Gitta Lubke, associate professor of psychology at Notre Dame, is at the forefront of developing new statistical methods to help find DNA markers that are related to psychiatric disorders—and spur further research regarding individual patients’ conditions.

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Moreau Fellow Studies Impact of Student Loan Policies

Categories: General News and Research

Today, most students in the United States must rely on some combination of loans and scholarships to attend college. Over the course of her own journey through the higher education system, Deondra Rose, who recently joined the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science this fall as a fellow in the Moreau Academic Diversity Postdoctoral Program, says she became fascinated with the complicated history and politics surrounding the development of student aid.

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Political Science Major Makes Mark at Summer Institute

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Research

Hours of class each day and frenzied paper writing into the early dawn hours is practically a Notre Dame tradition during finals weeks in December and May. Less so in the middle of July, but this is exactly what senior political science major Angel Mira found himself doing this past summer. Mira was one of just 20 students nationwide accepted into the American Political Science Association’s Ralph Bunche Summer Institute.

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Cities in the Desert: Anthropologist Rahul Oka Studies Trade in African Refugee Camps

Author: Carol C. Bradley

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Rahul Oka, Ford Family Assistant Professor of anthropology at Notre Dame, has conducted five seasons of ethnographic research in the 90,000-person Kakuma Refugee Camp, in the Turkana District in northwest Kenya, where refugees from war—from southern Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Congo and Uganda—co-exist.

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A Memorable Reacquaintance in Rome: Pope Presents Prize to Notre Dame Theologian

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Some 40 years ago, Rev. Brian E. Daley, S.J., Catherine F. Huisking Professor of Theology, then a doctoral student at Oxford, met Rev. Joseph A. Ratzinger, then a professor of theology at the University of Regensburg, at an academic conference in Germany. Whether or not Pope Benedict XVI remembers their first meeting, Father Daley won’t soon forget their second. On Oct. 20, at a ceremony at the Vatican, Pope Benedict presented Father Daley with a 2012 Ratzinger Prize for Theology.

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Professor Kasey Buckles Brings Economics Home

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Kasey Buckles, an assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Economics, challenges undergraduates to take the theories, statistics, and modeling tools they learn in their core courses and apply them to universal life experiences like birth, marriage, divorce, and other family dynamics. In her research-focused seminar called Economics of the Family, Buckles and her students explore questions such as “What is the effect of birth order on prenatal investment in children?” and “How does a mother’s age at first birth affect the academic achievement of her children?”

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Video: Fighting For a More Generous World

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Exploring an essential human virtue. Whether it’s the gift of time, money, or a helping hand, everyone has the capacity to transform someone else’s life. But, in a world where millions struggle to put food on the table, millions more struggle either to keep their jobs or to find jobs that pay a living wage, and millions still struggle with either preventable or treatable diseases, why do some people give so much and others so little? The University of Notre Dame’s Science of Generosity initiative is leading an international effort to uncover the causes, manifestations, and consequences of generosity.

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New Book Illuminates Sierra Leonean War and the Role of Love

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

When Catherine Bolten first considered studying the city of Makeni in Sierra Leone, many people—government officials, professors, the U.S. ambassador—warned her to stay away. It’s a dangerous and immoral place, they told her, infamous because residents refused to fight the rebels who occupied Makeni for three years (1998-2002) during the decade-long civil war.

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Varieties of Democracy Project Awarded European Commission Funding

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The Varieties of Democracy project (V-Dem), an ambitious international research collaboration based at Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute for International Studies, has been awarded €475,000 (about $616,500) in research support from the European Commission. Led by Notre Dame political scientist Michael Coppedge, Staffan Lindberg of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and John Gerring of Boston University, the multiyear project aims to produce better indicators of democracy, helping to illuminate why democracies around the world succeed or fail.

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Bringing the Unknown to Light: Faculty Research Overlooked French Writing

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Two professors of French and Francophone studies in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures are bringing recognition to little-known literature of the past and present. Through individual and joint research projects, Professor Julia Douthwaite, a specialist in 18th and 19th century French literature, and Associate Professor Alison Rice, an expert in French-language texts from the 20th and 21st centuries, are working toward this common goal.

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Historian Brad Gregory Wins Inaugural Book Prize

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

University of Notre Dame historian Brad Gregory has been awarded the inaugural Aldersgate Prize for Christian Scholarship for his latest book, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society. Presented by Indiana Wesleyan University’s John Wesley Honors College (JWHC), the prize recognizes a published book’s ability to reflect the highest ideals of Christian scholarship.

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