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Language ‘Clicks’ in Jordan for Arabic Major

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Senior Arabic and biology major Ryan Shannon says he learned as much during the University of Notre Dame’s Summer Language Abroad (SLA) program in Jordan as he did during four semesters of Arabic courses on campus. “Before I went to Amman, I had a hard time holding a conversation in Arabic,” Shannon says. “While there, all of a sudden things started making sense and clicking.”

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Chinese Professors Make Winning Translation Team

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

A Chinese novel translated by Notre Dame’s Howard Goldblatt and Sylvia Li-chun Lin recently won the 2010 Man Asian Literary Prize, which they share with author Bi Feiyu. The book, Three Sisters, was the fifth novel the two Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures professors translated together and the second to win a prize.

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Ph.D. Student Examines Animal Imagery in Literature

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

Damiano Benvegnù, a student in Notre Dame’s Ph.D. in Literature Program, can point to the moment when he changed his academic focus from astronomy to literature. “Reading William Blake’s ‘Tyger’ in a literature class in my liceo scientifico (high school) was an epiphany. The poem was an amazing feat for Blake in the late 18th century—and then a revelation for me, as a reader, more than 200 years later.”

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Notre Dame Chorale Prepares for Papal Audience

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Arts

“Toi, toi, toi” is a superstitious invocation of opera singers, meant to encourage a winning performance before taking the stage. “We don’t say, ‘Break a leg,’” fifth-year senior and University of Notre Dame Chorale member Joshua Diaz explains. Diaz might be hearing that old stage charm at an extraordinary venue later this month—the Basilica of St. Peter in Rome—where he and about 50 other members of the Notre Dame Chorale are scheduled to perform for Pope Benedict XVI and the bishops and pilgrims in attendance at a general audience on May 25, 2011.

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Christian Davenport Examines Untold Stories of Northern Ireland’s “Troubles”

“Most people who are interested in the Troubles focus on the 4,000 deaths,” says Christian Davenport, professor of peace studies, political science and sociology at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. “I thought much of the story was being missed.” An expert on political conflict, human rights violations, genocide, and government repression, Davenport for the past five years has been using quantitative research methods to study the ethno-political conflict that took place in Northern Ireland between 1968 and 1998.

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Abandoned Irish Island Offers a Window to the Past

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The last 24 human inhabitants of the Irish island of Inishark departed together on October 20, 1960—a solemn end to a slow, steady decline. This small community’s collapse more than 50 years ago now offers Anthropology Professor Ian Kuijt and his students “a window” to Irish life in the 19th century. “These people were living little differently than they were in the 1860s,” he explains.

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Ph.D. Student Analyzes Religion’s Influence on War and Peace

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Catholicism

No one would dispute that religious convictions can lead to conflict—even violence and war. Yet how is it that so often adversaries use their faith to justify opposing stances in the same dispute? That’s the question that intrigues Christopher Morrissey, a doctoral candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology.

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China Expert Lionel Jensen Addresses Disappearance of Activists

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The recent detention of Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei, along with several other government critics—including Ai’s accountant and driver—are signs that the Chinese government is becoming increasingly insecure, according to Lionel Jensen, associate professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Notre Dame.

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Doctoral Student Researches Violence in Guatemala

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

For the first time since their discovery in 2005, archival records chronicling police violence during the Guatemalan Civil War have been made available to academic researchers. And Ph.D. candidate Christopher Sullivan has become one of the first scholars to investigate the collection of more than 80 million documents at the National Police Archives in Guatemala City.

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Sociologist Christian Smith’s Book Wins International Prize

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Notre Dame sociologist Christian Smith’s latest book is one of two winners of the 2010 Cheryl Frank Memorial Prize from the International Association for Critical Realism (IACR). What is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up (University of Chicago Press) presents a new model for social theory that embraces the best of our humanistic visions of people, life, and society.

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Alumnus Works to Effect Change in Sudan

Author: Chris Milazzo

Categories: General News, Alumni, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Sudan has been torn by religious, social, and economic strife for decades. Seeking to ease these tensions, the Sudanese people voted to divide the country in two—north and south. But the referendum has left a host of unresolved issues in its wake. Through the Office of the U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan, Peter Quaranto ’06 is working with the African country’s residents to help reach a successful and sustainable resolution to the division.

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Anthropologist Rahul Oka Tracks Trade in Conflict Zones

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Even the most carefully planned humanitarian and development efforts are often stymied by the chaotic realities on the ground in war-torn zones such as Sudan and Northern Kenya. Notre Dame Economic anthropologist Rahul Oka aims to improve the success rate of these critical relief missions by studying how local trade networks are able to operate in the same areas with remarkable resilience and efficiency.

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Anthropologist Deb Rotman Takes Irish Oral Tradition Online

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Deb Rotman is in a race against time. Rotman, director of undergraduate studies for Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology, is keenly aware that the generation of Irish immigrants who can still share memories of the Irish Civil War and their experiences in early 20th century America will soon be lost forever. “Those generations have some really great stories that we’re trying to capture, but we can only do so much,” she says.

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Notre Dame Suspends Remainder of its Program in Japan

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News and Internationalism

The University of Notre Dame has suspended its international undergraduate program in Nagoya, Japan. In a letter to the two Notre Dame students participating in the Japanese study abroad program, the University’s Office of International Studies described the decision as “very difficult,” but that suspension was the most prudent course of action “due to the deteriorating environmental conditions in the areas around Tokyo and ongoing uncertainty about the stability of the nuclear power plant.”

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New Book Highlights Resurgence of Religion in Global Politics

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

For decades, many predicted that religion’s influence on global politics would decline. As modern society embraced democracy, globalization, and new technology, the supernatural would give way to science and free thought would trump dogma—or so the argument went. But a new book co-authored by Notre Dame political scientist Daniel Philpott shows the opposite to be true: Bolstered by the same forces many expected to diminish it, religion’s influence on politics has increased on almost every continent during the past 40 years.

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2011 Asian Film Festival Focuses on Japanese Anime

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Arts

Ninjas, mysterious dream worlds, and evil social-networking sites are among the themes that will play out on the big screen this weekend during the University of Notre Dame’s seventh annual Asian Film Festival and Conference. Presented by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center March 25-26, the festival will showcase five recent animated films from Japan, including two from internationally acclaimed director Satoshi Kon.

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Notre Dame Cancels Japan Undergraduate Program

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News and Internationalism

A spring semester program for University of Notre Dame students in Tokyo, Japan has been canceled by Notre Dame’s Office of International Studies due to the situation following that country’s March 11 earthquake and tsunami and its subsequent nuclear crisis. The three students enrolled in the canceled program had been scheduled to leave for Japan March 27.

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Course Explores Irish-American Experience From Varied Perspectives

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Bridget O’Malley was just 11 years old in 1909 when she left her family in Ireland and sailed to Boston. She was the youngest passenger listed on the ship’s manifest, which included one striking detail: Bridget was traveling alone. Why would a parent send away an 11 year-old girl? Why was she alone? What kind of life awaited her in Boston? A new course at Notre Dame explores these questions and broader issues of emigration through the lens of an archeological anthropologist, a historian and a scholar of Irish language.

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First Year a Success for Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study

Author: Renee Hochstetler

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Arts

What must we change in order to help us bridge the gap between the world as it is, and the world as it should be? In its first year, the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS)—inspired by the classical values of beauty, goodness and truth—began transforming the academic landscape through an annual conference, lecture series and fellowships.

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