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Conference to Explore Conceptions of Truth

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) will host an international conference, Conceptions of Truth, focused on the nature of truth. The interdisciplinary conference, scheduled for April 12-14 (Thursday-Saturday), will bring 17 leading experts to McKenna Hall to address the subject of “the truth.” The conference will include discussion of ideas presented as well as less formal opportunities for scholarly interaction.

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Day of the Dead iPad App a Collaborative Effort

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Grade school and middle school teachers can get a technological boost thanks to the vision and creativity of several Notre Dame students, faculty, and staff affiliated with the Institute for Latino Studies (ILS). “Day of the Dead: Experience the Tradition” is an iPad app recently created and available to the public that immerses users in a multimedia cultural experience of interactive videos, photos and articles that teach about Day of the Dead, a traditional Mexican holiday increasingly celebrated throughout the United States. With its indigenous roots infused with Catholic practices, the holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to remember loved ones who have died.

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Notre Dame Research Team Featured in Launch of Latin American/Latino Digital Archive Project

A research team based at the Julian Samora Library in the College of Arts and Letters’ Institute for Latino Studies (ILS) is one of three hemispheric teams to have its work featured in the launch of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston’s (MFAH) digital archive, which was formally released to the public during an international symposium held January 19–20 in Houston.

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For Top Irish Language Tweeter, It’s #lovetostudyIrish

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Internationalism

University of Notre Dame senior Brian Boll has changed his major several times: First it was anthropology, then English, then philosophy, followed by medieval studies. “I always was, and still am, interested in too many things, but there’s one interest that’s always seemed to get the upper hand: language, languages and their study.” Specifically, study of the Irish language.

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Political Scientist Daniel Philpott Begins Research on Forgiveness in Uganda

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

What role, if any, does forgiveness play in the context of war, in the wake of unspeakable atrocities? Daniel Philpott, associate professor of political science and peace studies, recently returned from Uganda, where he is exploring the practice of forgiveness among survivors of the two-decades-long civil war between the Lord’s Resistance Army and the Ugandan government.

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Psychologist Mark Cummings Studies How Political Violence Impacts Children

Author: Sarah Hutcheon and Susan Guibert

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Political violence and the aftermath of war are known to be harmful to children’s and teens’ mental health and well-being, but until now, few studies have examined how this happens. A new longitudinal study of neighborhoods in Belfast, Northern Ireland, led by University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Mark Cummings, has found political violence affects children by upsetting the ways their families function, resulting in behavior problems and mental health symptoms among the youths over extended periods of time.

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Economist Kirk Doran Shows How Communism's Collapse Changed Mathematics in the U.S.

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1992 brought an influx of Soviet mathematicians to U.S. institutions, and those scholars’ differing areas of specialization have changed the way math is studied and taught in this country, according to new research by University of Notre Dame Economist Kirk Doran and George Borjas from Harvard University.

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Molly Kinder to Receive Kroc Institute 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: General News, Alumni, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Molly Kinder ‘01, who majored in political science and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame, will receive the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Kinder, a native of Buffalo, New York, is director of special programs for Development Innovation Ventures in Washington, D.C., a new initiative at the United States Agency for International Development that funds groundbreaking approaches to global development challenges.

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The Medieval Institute: A Community of Medievalists

Author: Carol Bradley

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

The Medieval Institute, located on the seventh floor of the Hesburgh Library, is a scholarly and academic unit of the University that promotes research and teaching on the cultures, languages, and religions of the medieval period (from roughly the fifth through 15th centuries). Its faculty come from more than a dozen different departments in the College of Arts and Letters

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ScreenPeace Film Festival Begins February 2

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s annual ScreenPeace Film Festival will kick off with a powerful film about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans. On the Bridge, directed by College of Arts and Letters faculty member Olivier Morel, explores the impact of PTSD on former soldiers as they adapt to life outside of combat.

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Political Scientist Debra Javeline Researches Responses to “Russia’s 9/11”

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

On the morning of September 1, 2004, University of Notre Dame political scientist Debra Javeline found herself, like many people around the world, glued to the television, watching in horror as the Beslan school hostage crisis—widely known as “Russia’s 9/11”—unfolded. Dozens of militants from a Chechen separatist group had converged on a school in the Russian town of Beslan in North Ossetia. For three days, the terrorists held hostage more than 1,200 children, teachers, and parents.

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Sociologist Christian Smith Wins Multiple Book Awards

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Christian Smith, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, was recently honored for two of his latest books: What Is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good From the Person Up and Souls in Transition: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults.

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Scholars Explore Religion’s Role in International Relations

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

From Cairo to Kabul to New York City, the events shaping our world are informed by the deeply held religious beliefs of contemporary history’s major protagonists. So why is the dynamic role of religion in world affairs still such a hard academic sell in political science and international relations programs around the country? “I think if the field were to be proportioned according to what you see in headlines, religion would deserve a much larger place in the study of international relations,” says Daniel Philpott, who is associate professor of political science and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame and on the faculty of the Kroc Institute for Peace Studies.

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Political Scientist Michael Desch Discusses Proposed U.S. Military Cuts

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The Obama administration’s recent announcement of military force reductions—particularly the downsizing of ground forces—not only will meet resistance from the iron triangle of the military-defense industry congressional complex, but also will offer a clear target for aspiring Republican presidential nominees, according to University of Notre Dame Political Science Chair Michael Desch.

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Alumna Reports From the Heart of the Vatican

Author: By Andrew Vanden Bossche

Categories: General News, Alumni, Internationalism, and Catholicism

Elizabeth Simari ’08, crosses Saint Peter’s Square on the way to and from work, shops at the Vatican’s grocery store, and has even had the Pope drop by her office. “It’s an amazing experience,” says Simari, who majored in Italian and English at Notre Dame and now works for the weekly English edition of the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano. “I feel blessed to have these once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.”

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Cataloging of Ambrosiana Drawings Nears Completion

Author: Carol Bradley

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

The Ambrosiana Collection, housed in the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, was created through an agreement between His Eminence Giovanni Battista Montini, then the cardinal–archbishop of Milan (later Pope Paul VI) and President Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C. The collection includes microfilms and photographic copies of nearly all of the drawings in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milan, Italy’s historic library founded in 1609.

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Music Historian and Liturgical Scholar Margot Fassler Wins International Book Prize

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, Catholicism, Arts, and Faculty News

Margot Fassler, Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Music History and Liturgy and co-director of the Master of Sacred Music program at the University of Notre Dame, has won the biennial ACE/Mercers’ International Book Award. The award from Art and Christianity Enquiry (ACE) recognizes Fassler’s 2010 book The Virgin of Chartres: Making History Through Liturgy and the Arts as “an outstanding contribution to the dialogue between religious faith and the visual arts.”

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Economics Research to Improve Sanitation in Africa Gets $1 Million Boost

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Molly Lipscomb, assistant professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame, and Laura Schechter and Jean-François Houde, economists at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, hope to increase the accessibility of sanitation technology in poor neighborhoods in Dakar, Senegal. Their two-year research project is supported by a more than $1 million grant to Innovations for Poverty Action from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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Political Scientist and Legal Scholar Donald Kommers Receives Mellon Fellowship

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Can a newly minted constitution help revive a people devastated by war? Can it produce a deliberative democracy and respect for human rights? Can it provide a foundation for political loyalty and facilitate the reunification of a divided nation? These are questions University of Notre Dame political scientist and legal scholar Donald Kommers seeks to answer in his study of the creation, maintenance, and legitimacy of Germany’s postwar constitutional order, for which he has been awarded a yearlong Emeritus Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Crowdsourcing: Are Two Heads Better Than One?

Author: Nina Welding

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

A competition developed by a team of University of Notre Dame experts, including sociologist David S. Hachen, Jr., uses concepts from open sourcing and crowdsourcing to help propose and assess new civil infrastructure systems for developing countries. The Shelters for All Competition: A Call to Deliver Safe, Affordable Housing to the World’s Poor challenges participants to design low-cost and safe housing that fits the cultural context of the communities in which the homes will be built.

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New Documentary Explores “Compassion in Global Health”

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Catholicism

University of Notre Dame faculty and students recently joined colleagues at an inaugural symposium on Compassion in Global Health, which featured the premiere of a new documentary on the subject. Highlighting the experiences of notable participants as shared in a meeting last year at the Carter Center in Atlanta, the film includes perspectives from President Jimmy Carter, global health champion Paul Farmer, smallpox eradication hero Bill Forge, Earth Institute founder Jeffrey Sachs, former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher, and Notre Dame theology professor Lawrence Sullivan, as well as other physicians, experts and patients from around the globe.

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German Professor Spreads Love of Language Learning

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Hannelore Weber, an associate teaching professor in Notre Dame’s Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures, recently received the Goethe-Institut/American Association of Teachers of German Certificate of Merit. Presented to just four people nationally each year, the award acknowledges educators who have significantly furthered the teaching of German in schools around the United States.

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Rousseau Exhibit to Focus on Dignity of the Human Person

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Julia Douthwaite, professor of French in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, is organizing a series of events to honor Swiss philosopher and writer Jean–Jacques Rousseau’s 300th birthday and stimulate a cross–disciplinary discussion on social justice and human dignity. The project, called Rousseau 2012: On the Road to DIGNITY, will be part of the curriculum for more than a dozen courses throughout the College of Arts and Letters and the Law School and will feature both guest lectures and an Amnesty International photography exhibit on poverty and human rights that includes portraits from Mexico, Egypt, Nigeria, India, and Macedonia.

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