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Connecting to Haiti's Creole Language and Culture

Karen Richman, a Notre Dame anthropologist who studies Haitian culture and popular religion, has been honored with the 2012 Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence. Her free, online Creole Language and Culture class was one of five winners in the text and still image category—selected from among the 17,000 courses shared by universities worldwide through the OpenCourseWare Consortium.

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Graduate Students Receive Hands-On Experience With Ancient Texts

Author: Kevin Zeise and Martin Bloomer

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

The Ambrosian Library in Milan hosted 11 Notre Dame graduate students over spring break, where they inspected and read manuscripts dating back to the fifth century A.D. Through the generosity and expertise of their hosts, the class saw some of the great treasures of the library including the Ambrosian fifth-century bible, the poet Petrarch’s copy of Virgil’s works, and Leonardo d Vinci’s notebooks.

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Political Theorist Eileen Hunt Botting Studies Women’s Rights

“Ideas matter, and they can be a powerful force for global political change,” says Eileen Hunt Botting, a University of Notre Dame political theorist who charts early thinking on women’s rights in countries around the world. Botting and political science major Sean Kronewitter ‘13 cowrote an article on the subject which was recently accepted for publication in the academic journal Political Theory.

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Olivier Morel’s Film Wins Accolades, Inspires Action

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

Olivier Morel’s film On the Bridge, about veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), has been selected for more than a dozen festivals, won multiple awards, and has been the subject of countless media interviews since its fall 2011 release. But all of that recognition pales in comparison with a chain of events that occurred earlier this year, the director and Notre Dame faculty member says.

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Political Scientist Michael Desch Analyzes Nuclear Summit

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The 2012 Nuclear Security Summit fell short of its goal of securing vulnerable nuclear materials around the world, as top officials of some 50 countries gathered earlier this week in South Korea in an effort to reduce the threat of nuclear terrorism. Much of the discussion focused on North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile activities, the post-tsunami problems at the Fukushima nuclear reactor plants and about Iran’s nuclear capabilities—all of which University of Notre Dame Political Science Professor and Chair Michael Desch believes “occupy a disproportionate place in our psyche.”

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Sociologist Larissa Fast Researches Safety of International Humanitarian Workers

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Hundreds of thousands of people around the world work for humanitarian organizations devoted to the sick and injured, refugees, and victims of wars and disasters. In recent years, this work has become even more dangerous, as growing numbers of humanitarian workers have been attacked, kidnapped, or killed, according to Larissa Fast, assistant professor of conflict resolution at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and Department of Sociology.

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Arts and Letters Faculty Receive Grant to Study Religion and Public Health in Uganda

Author: Esther Terry

Categories: Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Notre Dame political scientist Rev. Robert Dowd, C.S.C., and economist Molly Lipscomb have teamed up to conduct a randomized controlled trial in 250 villages of rural Uganda, where contaminated water is a major cause of health problems and premature death. Funded by a $279,000 grant from the John Templeton Foundation, the study will assess whether religious or political leaders are more effective at promoting health-enhancing behaviors.

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Award-Winning Short Documentary 'Okuyamba' to Screen at Hesburgh Center

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Okuyamba, a locally produced award-winning short documentary about palliative care in Uganda, will be shown in the auditorium of the University of Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Center for International Studies at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 21. The film is directed by Ted Mandell, a faculty member in Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT), and Mike Wargo of the Hospice Foundation.

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Conference to Explore Conceptions of Truth

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) will host an international conference, Conceptions of Truth, focused on the nature of truth. The interdisciplinary conference, scheduled for April 12-14 (Thursday-Saturday), will bring 17 leading experts to McKenna Hall to address the subject of “the truth.” The conference will include discussion of ideas presented as well as less formal opportunities for scholarly interaction.

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Day of the Dead iPad App a Collaborative Effort

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Grade school and middle school teachers can get a technological boost thanks to the vision and creativity of several Notre Dame students, faculty, and staff affiliated with the Institute for Latino Studies (ILS). “Day of the Dead: Experience the Tradition” is an iPad app recently created and available to the public that immerses users in a multimedia cultural experience of interactive videos, photos and articles that teach about Day of the Dead, a traditional Mexican holiday increasingly celebrated throughout the United States. With its indigenous roots infused with Catholic practices, the holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to remember loved ones who have died.

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Notre Dame Research Team Featured in Launch of Latin American/Latino Digital Archive Project

A research team based at the Julian Samora Library in the College of Arts and Letters’ Institute for Latino Studies (ILS) is one of three hemispheric teams to have its work featured in the launch of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston’s (MFAH) digital archive, which was formally released to the public during an international symposium held January 19–20 in Houston.

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For Top Irish Language Tweeter, It’s #lovetostudyIrish

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Internationalism

University of Notre Dame senior Brian Boll has changed his major several times: First it was anthropology, then English, then philosophy, followed by medieval studies. “I always was, and still am, interested in too many things, but there’s one interest that’s always seemed to get the upper hand: language, languages and their study.” Specifically, study of the Irish language.

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Political Scientist Daniel Philpott Begins Research on Forgiveness in Uganda

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

What role, if any, does forgiveness play in the context of war, in the wake of unspeakable atrocities? Daniel Philpott, associate professor of political science and peace studies, recently returned from Uganda, where he is exploring the practice of forgiveness among survivors of the two-decades-long civil war between the Lord’s Resistance Army and the Ugandan government.

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Psychologist Mark Cummings Studies How Political Violence Impacts Children

Author: Sarah Hutcheon and Susan Guibert

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Political violence and the aftermath of war are known to be harmful to children’s and teens’ mental health and well-being, but until now, few studies have examined how this happens. A new longitudinal study of neighborhoods in Belfast, Northern Ireland, led by University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Mark Cummings, has found political violence affects children by upsetting the ways their families function, resulting in behavior problems and mental health symptoms among the youths over extended periods of time.

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Economist Kirk Doran Shows How Communism's Collapse Changed Mathematics in the U.S.

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1992 brought an influx of Soviet mathematicians to U.S. institutions, and those scholars’ differing areas of specialization have changed the way math is studied and taught in this country, according to new research by University of Notre Dame Economist Kirk Doran and George Borjas from Harvard University.

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Molly Kinder to Receive Kroc Institute 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: General News, Alumni, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Molly Kinder ‘01, who majored in political science and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame, will receive the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Kinder, a native of Buffalo, New York, is director of special programs for Development Innovation Ventures in Washington, D.C., a new initiative at the United States Agency for International Development that funds groundbreaking approaches to global development challenges.

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The Medieval Institute: A Community of Medievalists

Author: Carol Bradley

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

The Medieval Institute, located on the seventh floor of the Hesburgh Library, is a scholarly and academic unit of the University that promotes research and teaching on the cultures, languages, and religions of the medieval period (from roughly the fifth through 15th centuries). Its faculty come from more than a dozen different departments in the College of Arts and Letters

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Political Scientist Debra Javeline Researches Responses to “Russia’s 9/11”

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

On the morning of September 1, 2004, University of Notre Dame political scientist Debra Javeline found herself, like many people around the world, glued to the television, watching in horror as the Beslan school hostage crisis—widely known as “Russia’s 9/11”—unfolded. Dozens of militants from a Chechen separatist group had converged on a school in the Russian town of Beslan in North Ossetia. For three days, the terrorists held hostage more than 1,200 children, teachers, and parents.

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ScreenPeace Film Festival Begins February 2

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s annual ScreenPeace Film Festival will kick off with a powerful film about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans. On the Bridge, directed by College of Arts and Letters faculty member Olivier Morel, explores the impact of PTSD on former soldiers as they adapt to life outside of combat.

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Sociologist Christian Smith Wins Multiple Book Awards

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Christian Smith, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, was recently honored for two of his latest books: What Is a Person?: Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good From the Person Up and Souls in Transition: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults.

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Scholars Explore Religion’s Role in International Relations

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

From Cairo to Kabul to New York City, the events shaping our world are informed by the deeply held religious beliefs of contemporary history’s major protagonists. So why is the dynamic role of religion in world affairs still such a hard academic sell in political science and international relations programs around the country? “I think if the field were to be proportioned according to what you see in headlines, religion would deserve a much larger place in the study of international relations,” says Daniel Philpott, who is associate professor of political science and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame and on the faculty of the Kroc Institute for Peace Studies.

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