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Exploring a new language leads history and political science senior to valuable research and international experiences — and a third major

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

What’s senior Liam Karr’s secret to juggling three majors, writing a thesis, and still finding time to practice and perform with the Notre Dame Glee Club? A little time management and a lot of love for what he does.“I just totally do the whole ‘study what you love’ thing, and don’t really care if my schedule looks a little busy,” he said. A self-described “history nerd” with an interest in politics, Karr quickly discovered how much natural overlap there is between his first two majors. Deciding to pursue a third major — Arabic — was more of an unexpected development.

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Francie Shaft thought her theology and Japanese majors would never intersect — until she went abroad. Now the connections keep appearing. 

Francie Shaft has discovered intersections between her theology and Japanese majors through her classes and research — both on campus and in Japan. Those opportunities would not have been possible, she said, without the support she found at Notre Dame. “Notre Dame wants you to start pursuing what you’re passionate about, even as a freshman. If I didn’t have these people who have believed in me from the start, I don’t think I would be as creative and as bold in the sorts of experiences I want to have.”

 

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Q&A with Patrícia Rodrigues, Ph.D. student in anthropology

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, General News, Graduate Students, and Q and A

Patrícia Rodrigues is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology and a fellow in the Kellogg Institute for International Studies focusing her research on the historical and anthropological bases for indigenous claims to territory and legal protection of archaeological sites and ecological resources in Brazil. In this interview, she discusses her research on the Wauja people in Brazil, why she chose Notre Dame, and how the anthropology program's emphasis on transdisciplinarity makes it distinctive.

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‘We can’t stop doing research just because there are obstacles’: International development studies minors adapt their capstone projects in wake of pandemic

Author: Ashley Rowland

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Political science major Oneile Baitlotli spent most of her junior year planning the summer research project abroad she needed to earn a minor in International Development Studies: a study of how to help low-income families in her native Botswana gain access to affordable early childhood education. But in March, the coronavirus largely suspended overseas travel and closed international borders. And Baitlotli and nearly a dozen other juniors in the Kellogg Institute for International Studies’ IDS program were forced to abandon their original capstone projects. With help from their faculty advisors and the Kellogg Institute, they developed new research projects they could do virtually within a matter of weeks. 

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Two Arts and Letters faculty members receive NSF Early Career Development Awards

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Sociologist Erin McDonnell and psychologist Nathan Rose have received National Science Foundation Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards for 2020. They are among nine University of Notre Dame faculty members to receive the awards this year. “This is the most prestigious award granted by the NSF to early-career faculty and reflects the quality of Erin McDonnell’s and Nathan Rose’s research,” said Sarah Mustillo, the I.A. O’Shaughnessy Dean of the College of Arts and Letters. “I am thrilled that they are continuing the College’s strong record of success with these awards.”

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Across three continents, research and languages are the keys to Ugandan undergrad’s success in economics and global affairs

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Whether he’s studying in Uganda or France, South Africa or South Bend — or speaking English, Luganda, French, or Swahili — Trevor Lwere has one topic at the forefront of his mind. No matter where he is, the economics and global affairs major is driven to investigate what different cultures and perspectives can teach each other about forming the best society. “Every time I move to a different place, I get curious about how different societies imagine how they should be organized and how they approach life,” he said.

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Video: Sociologist Dana Moss on studying authoritarian regimes, transnational repression, and protest movements

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, and General News

Dana Moss is an assistant professor of sociology at Notre Dame whose research interests include collective behavior and social movements, global and transnational sociology, international migration, and political sociology. She's currently working on a book project on the "Arab Spring abroad" — how Libyan, Yemeni, and Syrian communities, spread from as far away as Los Angeles to London, mobilized to support the Arab Spring revolutions that were happening in their home countries. She also developed a theory of transnational repression on how regimes constrain and pressure their diasporas.

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Notre Dame partners in Dublin launch virtual series on Newman’s ‘The Idea of a University’

Author: Margaret Arriola

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, and General News

The Notre Dame Dublin Global Gateway and the Notre Dame-Newman Centre for Faith and Reason have launched a new, four-part international series to celebrate the first anniversary of the canonization of St. John Henry Newman — theologian, poet, convert and founder of the Catholic University of Ireland. “Thinking with Newman: Educating with Intention Today” will explore Newman’s seminal work, “The Idea of a University,” and its contemporary relevance to educational challenges faced today during the coronavirus crisis. The series launches on Oct. 7, and registration is required.

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Anthropologist's study becomes first to define link between testosterone and fathers’ social roles outside the family

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, and General News

Most of the research on the biology of fatherhood has focused on fathers in the U.S., Europe and some Asian countries. In these settings, levels of some hormones, such as lower testosterone and higher oxytocin, have been linked to more nurturing fathering. A Notre Dame research team wants to take a wider view. The role of fathers can vary greatly across cultures, and the researchers aimed to test whether the biology of fatherhood did, too. To get a more complete picture of hormones and fatherhood that includes different cultures, social support systems, and social hierarchies, Lee Gettler, associate professor of anthropology, led a team that worked with the BaYaka and Bondongo societies in the Republic of the Congo. The team’s paper was published this week in Nature magazine’s Scientific Reports.

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With NEH grant, Notre Dame philosopher Paul Weithman planning conference on enduring impact of John Rawls

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, and General News

Rawls' work A Theory of Justice has had a lasting and far-reaching influence on the fields of economics, political science, philosophy, and law — and nearly 50 years after its publication, it remains one of the greatest works of political philosophy ever produced, said Paul Weithman, the Glynn Family Honors Professor of Philosophy. With funding from a Collaborative Research Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Weithman is planning a conference commemorating the 50th anniversary of the book’s publication in September 2021.

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How an Arts & Letters education inspired art history major Meg Burns to follow her passion — and be open to change

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Senior Meg Burns says that the tagline to her experience at Notre Dame could be, “It’s OK to change your mind.” After three semesters majoring in biochemistry, Burns decided to follow her passion and major in art history. Then, during her junior year, she dramatically shifted the focus of her senior thesis after having completed research in Dublin. Looking back, Burns said these moments became valuable learning experiences themselves.

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From Here to There: Program helps underrepresented students advance their academic career

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Alumni, Undergraduate News, and General News

A small but growing number of tenure-track faculty have roots in Multicultural Student Programs and Services (MSPS), a program of the Division of Student Affairs at Notre Dame that provides access to opportunities and resources for historically underrepresented students to thrive at Notre Dame and beyond. “Because of MSPS, I was lucky enough to have professors that took an interest in me and pointed me in the right direction to come to the idea that graduate school was something that I could do,” said Camille Suarez, a 2013 Arts & Letters graduate.

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An affinity for problem solving leads Program of Liberal Studies student to South Africa, Denmark — and to the Great Books major

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Senior Sam Cannova’s affinity for problem solving has driven him to pursue a diverse range of experiences at Notre Dame. It has inspired him to dive deep into classic texts, volunteer for a nonprofit in the South Bend community, and travel to South Africa to conduct research on hip-hop culture. He entered Notre Dame intending to major in business but was inspired to try out some Program of Liberal Studies classes after hearing about the experiences of other students in the program.

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Notre Dame London Global Gateway launches new program on Alfred Hitchcock, led by FTT professor

Author: Joanna Byrne

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, and General News

The Notre Dame London Global Gateway, along with five partners from across the Notre Dame campus, has launched the London Book Club, an interactive, educational enrichment program featuring Notre Dame’s expert faculty. Throughout the year, relevant themes will be selected, and participants will be invited to join four weekly meetings to discuss books, excerpts, films, and other materials. London’s first program, “Hitchcock in London,” is led by Susan Ohmer, the William T. and Helen Kuhn Carey Associate Professor of Modern Communications in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre.

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Most comprehensive study yet of Latinx U.S. immigration agents shows economic self-interest drives decisions to join ICE

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, and General News

Research by David Cortez, assistant professor of political science, found that Latinxs — regardless of their preferred national/ethnic identity, their identification with the immigrant experience or their attitude toward immigrants — choose to work in immigration for their own economic interest.

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With Mellon Foundation fellowship, historian to study global economic and cultural impact of coffee

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Paul Ocobock, a Notre Dame associate professor of history, has received a fellowship from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to study the complex economic and cultural connections between coffee lovers and the men, women, and children who grow the beans in places like Kenya. The New Directions Fellowship will support Ocobock’s research of key forces in the history of international trade for his book Imperial Blend: Kenyan Coffee and Capitalism in the Era of Anglo-American Empire, and to develop new courses on global economic history.

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Italian studies director invited to join Vatican's Dante centenary committee

Author: David Lummus

Categories: Faculty News, Catholicism, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Theodore J. Cachey Jr., a professor of Italian and the Albert J. and Helen M. Ravarino Family Director of Dante and Italian Studies, has been invited to sit on the scientific committee for the 2021 Dante centenary, organized by the Pontifical Council for Culture. He is the sole representative of Dante studies outside of Italy to participate in the deliberations of the planning committee.

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Program of Liberal Studies professor wins fellowship to research at center for Italian Renaissance studies in Florence

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Denis Robichaud, an associate professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, has been awarded the I Tatti Jean-François Malle Residential Fellowship for his project, Controversies over God and Being in the Italian Renaissance: religion, philosophy, and Giovanni Pico della Mirandola’s De ente et uno. As one of 15 recipients awarded an I Tatti residential fellowship, Robichaud will spend a year researching and writing at I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy.

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The Inspiration Place: Writers and artists find space to create at Ireland's Kylemore Abbey

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: Arts, Internationalism, Undergraduate News, General News, and Graduate Students

At Kylemore Abbey in western Ireland, the presence of pure beauty overwhelms. A mere picture will not suffice; you must draw or write or paint. That’s the idea behind two summer programs that Notre Dame runs at the abbey in the Connemara mountains. The debut of a month-long graduate art residency last summer adds another option on top of a three-credit creative writing seminar that began in 2016. The 19 students spent the first week at the Dublin Global Gateway soaking in the city arts and lit scene, then spent the remainder at Kylemore Abbey, a 19th-century castle where Notre Dame has renovated a section for hosting guests.

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Kylemore Abbey Global Centre, campus partners announce new program on literary works and films during pandemics

The Kylemore Abbey Global Centre, along with six partners from across the University of Notre Dame campus, has launched the Kylemore Book Club, an open, multimedia, educational enrichment program featuring Notre Dame’s expert faculty. The debut program, “Literature and Film in Lockdown,” is led by Professor of English and the Donald R. Keough Family Professor of Irish Studies Barry McCrea

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History alumna follows her curiosity and ‘growth mindset’ to a career in publishing, artificial intelligence, and podcasts

Author: Jack Rooney

Categories: Internationalism, Alumni, Undergraduate News, and General News

Michelle Gaseor ’11 doesn’t meet many other history majors in the tech world. But in her career, which has taken her from educational publishing and user experience design to the forefront of conversational artificial intelligence, she continually builds upon the foundation she established in the College of Arts and Letters. 

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Twenty Arts and Letters students and alumni awarded Fulbright grants

Twenty-six University of Notre Dame students and alumni — including 20 from the College of Arts and Letters — have been awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants to teach or study abroad during the 2020-21 academic year. Notre Dame has been a top producer of Fulbright students for six consecutive years.

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International economics major combats poverty through researching and implementing microfinance services

At Notre Dame, senior Emily Pohl found a passion for social change — and put it into action. An international economics major with a concentration in French, Pohl worked to combat the cycle of poverty by researching and implementing microfinance initiatives. She is graduating with a portfolio of real-world research experiences, a published journal article, and a position at LEK Consulting in Chicago. And it was her Arts and Letters education that empowered her to take action.

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How the Program of Liberal Studies helped McKenna Cassidy expand her mind, strengthen her faith, and find a career path she loves 

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

The Program of Liberal Studies’ motto — Learn what it means to be human — is a phrase that Notre Dame senior McKenna Cassidy has taken to heart. She grappled with big ideas in her Arts and Letters courses, traveled to Italy to research Renaissance mealtime rituals, and followed her passions to a career in the wine industry. “That motto is a wonderful goal for each individual,” Cassidy said. “It is important to understand who I am and why I’m here, and I’m grateful for the space that the College of Arts and Letters has created for me to discern that question.”

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Through research and teaching, Notre Dame historian and gender studies scholar-in-residence explores how archives shape narratives

What Karen Graubart didn’t find in archives in Spain and Peru was, in some ways, as valuable as what she did. An associate professor in the Department of History, Graubart has spent more than 15 years conducting archival research on women and non-dominant communities in the Iberian Empire for her first two books. But she is also considering how the archives themselves have shaped her research — by questioning who is represented in them and why.

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How palm oil explains state-building in Colombia: A Q&A with political science Ph.D. candidate Camilo Neito-Matiz

What does palm oil — cheap, easy to produce, and endlessly versatile — explain about state-building in a region wracked by violence? Plenty, according to Ph.D. candidate Camilo Nieto-Matiz, a comparative political scientist who studies how states increase their capacity in subnational peripheries, poor areas with little state presence, in times of conflict. In other words, he examines how governments undertake fundamental tasks like providing security, collecting taxes, and building schools and roads ­— all of which are necessary for development, democracy, and political order.

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Historian wins book prize for her work on Parisian market women in the French Revolution

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

Katie Jarvis, an associate professor in the Department of History, has been awarded the Louis A. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies for her work, Politics in the Marketplace: Work, Gender, and Citizenship in Revolutionary France. The book is the first study of the Parisian market women — the Dames des Halles — during the French Revolution and explores how the Dames’ political activism and economic activities shaped the nature of nascent democracy and capitalism through daily commerce.

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Through sociology, Spanish, and constitutional studies, senior hopes to ‘build a career by doing good’

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Morgan Peck didn’t know what she wanted to major in when she was applying to colleges. But an enthusiasm for learning and an openness to new experiences has helped her discover three disciplines she loves — sociology, Spanish, and constitutional studies. And all three — plus her desire to serve others — intersect in an issue she hopes to devote her career to. “In immigration law, I see a combination of my passion for learning about the Spanish and Latino cultures and my desire to help people,” she said. “That's something that's been instilled in me since I was very young — build a career by doing good.”

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Peace studies and anthropology Ph.D. candidate named 2020 Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellow in Women’s Studies

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

Categories: Internationalism, Research, General News, and Graduate Students

Maryam Rokhideh, a Notre Dame doctoral candidate in peace studies and anthropology, has been named a 2020 Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellow in Women’s Studies. Ten highly-selective fellowships are awarded annually to humanities and social science Ph.D. candidates whose work addresses women’s and gender issues in interdisciplinary and original ways.

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Anthropologist produces policy recommendations for refugee resilience in Kenya

Author: Heather Asiala

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

In a world with more than 70 million displaced persons, the average refugee will spend more than 17 years displaced, with many settling long-term in refugee camps dependent on humanitarian aid. The continued prevalence and growth of protracted refugee camps has become unsustainable for host states and insufficient for refugees, who have the right to dignified and productive lives. In 2019, the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) Research Technical Assistance Center (RTAC) commissioned Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology and Pulte Institute for Global Development to help them understand the personal, economic, and social complexities that may affect refugee and host community self-sufficiency. 

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