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Two A&L graduate students join inaugural cohort of digital scholarship pedagogy fellowship program

Author: Jenna Mrozinske

Categories: General News and Graduate Students

Five Notre Dame graduate students, including two from the College of Arts & Letters, have been accepted into the inaugural cohort of the Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship Pedagogy Fellows for the 2021-2022 academic year. The new fellowship program is an opportunity for Notre Dame Ph.D. students from Arts & Letters and the College of Science to build their teaching expertise, gain instructional experience, and engage in a life-long community of practice.

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In research and community outreach, psychology Ph.D. student strives for science to influence policy and make an impact on the public

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Research, General News, and Graduate Students

Morgan Widhalm Munsen knows that effective communication is key for scientific research to have real life implications. So, in addition to conducting significant research of her own as a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Psychology, Munsen also pursues community-based projects that make science more accessible and understandable to the general public. “It’s not like you can do research and then suddenly expect it to be meaningful to people,” Munsen said. “Which is why I think it’s so important for scientists and researchers to tell stories about their research and help to make it as relevant as possible to people.” 

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New horizons in the old world: Medieval Institute Ph.D. student makes the case for the importance of Mexico in the Middle Ages

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, General News, and Graduate Students

While many scholars have examined the early connections between Europe and the Americas, most approach the issue from one perspective or the other. Americanists tend to emphasize that the Spanish influence was an imposition and that indigenous culture was destroyed, while scholars of European history focus on evangelization and acculturation. Notre Dame Medieval Institute Ph.D. student Carlos Diego Arenas Pacheco seeks a balance between the two, however, arguing that indigenous culture in Mexico did not disappear — it was remade into something different, not only by the hands of the Europeans, but also by the hands of the indigenous peoples themselves.

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A Q&A with Nicholas Roberts, history Ph.D. alumnus

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, General News, Graduate Students, and Q and A

Nicholas Roberts completed his Ph.D. in history at Notre Dame in May, focusing on modern Islamic history. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in music performance and history from Syracuse University in 2009 and his Master of Arts in global, international, and comparative history from Georgetown University in 2014. This fall, he is joining Norwich University as assistant professor of Middle Eastern history. In this interview, he discusses why he chose Notre Dame, his research on the history of the Omani Empire in the Indian Ocean, and why places like the Middle East, Africa, and the Indian Ocean should be more of a focal point in historical narratives.

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How sociology Ph.D. candidate Abigail Jorgensen used the pandemic to strengthen her research on motherhood, politics, and identity 

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Graduate Students

Abigail Jorgensen ’16 first began exploring women’s relationships with politics for her senior thesis in the College of Arts & Letters. That experience not only sparked a passion for research, but also laid the foundation for her career in academia. Now a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology with a graduate minor in gender studies, she is finalizing her dissertation on motherhood, fertility intentions, and political behavior, titled “Becoming the Mommy Politic.” While existing research on voting behavior often divides women into “mothers” and “non-mothers,” Jorgensen argues that scholars should take a more expansive view of when the shift into motherhood begins and how long it takes.

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Website, film developed by faculty fellow and Ph.D. student encourage parenting for peaceableness

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Graduate Students

In less than six minutes, the new film “Breaking the Cycle” invites caregivers, parents, policymakers, and anyone concerned with child development to adopt more collaborative and peace-inducing strategies for child rearing. The new film, a companion to the website EvolvedNest.org, grew out of groundbreaking research by Darcia Narvaez, Kroc Institute faculty fellow and professor emerita of psychology, with support from current peace studies and psychology Ph.D. student Mary Tarsha.

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Theology Ph.D. candidate named 2021 Lilly Graduate Fellow

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: General News and Graduate Students

Shaun Evans, a doctoral candidate in theology at the University of Notre Dame, has been named a 2021 Lilly Graduate Fellow. He is one of 10 Lilly Graduate Fellows from a pool of more than 60 applicants nationwide. Established with a grant from the Lilly Endowment and based at Christ College, the interdisciplinary honors college at Valparaiso University, the Lilly Graduate Fellows Program supports exceptionally well qualified young people who have bachelor’s degrees from Lilly Fellowship Program Network Schools and who are interested in becoming teacher-scholars at church-related colleges and universities in the U.S.

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'We were panicking': How political science grad students persevered through COVID-19

Author: Ashley Rowland

Categories: Research, General News, and Graduate Students

How do you plan and write a dissertation when the world is shutting down? When you’re under lockdown and you can’t travel to do your field research. When the projects critical to your work — really, to your career and your future — have been halted. Three Kellogg Institute-affiliated doctoral students, all comparative political scientists and all working far from home when the pandemic hit, spoke about how COVID has affected their lives and their work in the past year.

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Emmanuel Cannady, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, investigates activism and perseverance

Author: The Graduate School

Categories: Research, General News, and Graduate Students

As a budding public intellectual, a voice for social justice movements, and a force for good as a researcher, teacher, mentor, activist, and speaker, Emmanuel Cannady is an exemplar among graduate students at Notre Dame. His research as a sociologist explores the internal processes in Black activist organizations. Using an ethnographic approach, Cannady investigates how activists' use of their experiences and knowledge affect the “perseverance process” of their organizations. 

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English Ph.D. alumnus Jay David Miller awarded ACLS fellowship to explore how Quaker rhetoric addressed injustice in early America

Jay David Miller, who received his Ph.D. in English from Notre Dame in spring 2020, has been awarded a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies for his project, Quaker Jeremiad. Miller, currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, focuses his research on early American literature. His dissertation traces the development of Quaker rhetoric on agrarian labor and justice, examining the ways that rhetoric shifts from the beginnings of the Quaker movement in 17th-century England as it moves across the Atlantic and confronts agrarian issues like enslavement and indigenous dispossession.

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Notre Dame researchers partner with U.S. Air Force and Trek10 to launch cloud engineering learning platform

Author: Kate Flanagan

Categories: Faculty News, Research, General News, and Graduate Students

Notre Dame researchers in the Center for Research Computing and Department of Psychology, in partnership with the U.S. Air Force’s (USAF) Business Enterprise Systems Directorate’s product innovation initiative, and Trek10, a cloud engineering innovation company based in the University’s Innovation Park, have developed an adaptive online learning platform to educate members of the Air Force on cloud computing.

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Twenty-one Arts & Letters students and alumni awarded Fulbright grants to teach, study, or research abroad

Twenty-six University of Notre Dame students and alumni — including 21 from the College of Arts & Letters — have been awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants to teach or study abroad during the 2021-22 academic year. Notre Dame has been a top producer of Fulbright students for seven consecutive years.

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Notre Dame launches Center for Citizenship & Constitutional Government

The University of Notre Dame has launched the Center for Citizenship & Constitutional Government, a new hub of scholarship and education that strives to be a national focal point on Catholicism, constitutional government, and liberal democracy. The new center seeks to cultivate thoughtful and educated citizens by supporting scholarship and education concerning the ideas and institutions of constitutional government. 

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Q&A with Luiz Vilaça, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Sociology

Luiz Vilaça is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Sociology and a Ph.D. fellow in the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. His research focuses on the sociology of law, organizations, and politics. In this interview, he discusses how state organizations build the autonomy and capacity to investigate corruption, how Brazil startled the world by dismantling multiple schemes of bribery and kickbacks, and why it's important to examine these anti-corruption investigations from a sociological perspective.

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Q&A with Claire Scott-Bacon, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Psychology

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Graduate Students, and Q and A

Claire Scott-Bacon is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Psychology’s clinical program and was recently awarded a Distinguished Graduate Fellowship from the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study. Her research focuses on issues related to the structure and assessment of criminal personality in clinical, forensic, and legal settings. In this interview, she discusses her work and its impact on the high rate of wrongful convictions and criminalization of mental health-related crimes in the United States.

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8 A&L students named to Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study distinguished graduate fellowship class

Author: Kristian Olsen

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Research, and Graduate Students

Chosen on the basis of their research promise, interdisciplinary potential, and collaborative commitment, each of the graduate fellows is conducting a substantial research project related to resilience, the NDIAS’s organizing research theme for the 2021-2022 school year. Two of the fellows are co-sponsored by the Notre Dame Technology Ethics Center (ND-TEC) and are pursuing research projects that engage with questions related to the ethical use of technology.

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Surround-sound choral installation by Sacred Music at Notre Dame returns vocal performance to campus, featuring pieces reflecting range of pandemic emotions

Author: Kate Flanagan

Categories: Faculty News, Arts, Catholicism, General News, and Graduate Students

A new installation by Sacred Music at Notre Dame’s Concordia choir is currently set up in the O’Shaughnessy Great Hall and accessible through May 20. Featuring 16 speakers arranged in a surround-sound pattern, each playing the voice of one singer, listeners are able to stand in the center of the room and feel as if they are on stage, or walk around the room to hear each voice in isolation. Each song represents a unique perspective from which to view the pandemic — with enough variety that a listener could find their own meaning in the pieces.

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Notre Dame Department of Theology ranked No. 1 in the world by QS World University Rankings

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Faculty News, Catholicism, Undergraduate News, General News, and Graduate Students

For the second consecutive year, the University of Notre Dame has been ranked as the best in the world in theology, divinity, and religious studies by the influential QS World University Rankings. The No. 1 ranking is based on academic reputation, employer reputation, and research impact. With an overall score of 92.8, the Department of Theology placed ahead of Harvard University, the University of Oxford, Duke University, and Durham University.

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Notre Dame among top Fulbright producers for 7th straight year

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Internationalism, Undergraduate News, General News, Graduate Students, and National Fellowships

With 29 finalists — including 24 from the College of Arts & Letters — Notre Dame ranked 7th this year in a tie with New York University, according to the U.S. State Department, which administers the Fulbright Program via the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

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The Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study launches new distinguished graduate fellowship program

Author: Kristian Olsen and Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, and Graduate Students

The Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study has launched a pilot program to support up to six Notre Dame doctoral students with exceptional academic records whose research and career interests centrally involve interdisciplinary engagement with major ethical questions. The new NDIAS Distinguished Graduate Fellowship Program, funded with support from Michael Wilsey ’65, provides graduate fellows from the College of Arts and Letters with premium stipends, robust research programming, and professional development during the 2021-2022 academic year.

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Medieval Institute introduces graduate minors in medieval studies and Byzantine studies

Author: Kate Flanagan

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, and Graduate Students

Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute is launching graduate minors in medieval studies and Byzantine studies, a pair of interdisciplinary programs that blend the study of literature, philosophy, art, and science in the Middle Ages. The minor in medieval studies focuses on the texts, culture, and artifacts of Western Europe and the Mediterranean from 500 to 1500 A.D.,  while the minor in Byzantine studies emphasizes Central Asia, Asia Minor, and the Eastern Mediterranean during that same time period.

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Notre Dame launches interdisciplinary Initiative on Race and Resilience

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, Research, Undergraduate News, General News, and Graduate Students

The University of Notre Dame has launched the Initiative on Race and Resilience, a new interdisciplinary program focused on the redress of systemic racism and the support of communities of color both within and beyond the Notre Dame campus. Led by the College of Arts & Letters with additional support from the Office of the Provost, the initiative will bring together scholars and students in the humanities, arts, social sciences, and other disciplines to challenge systemic racism and promote racial equality through research, education, and community empowerment. 

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Q&A with Patrícia Rodrigues, Ph.D. student in anthropology

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Internationalism, Research, General News, Graduate Students, and Q and A

Patrícia Rodrigues is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology and a fellow in the Kellogg Institute for International Studies focusing her research on the historical and anthropological bases for indigenous claims to territory and legal protection of archaeological sites and ecological resources in Brazil. In this interview, she discusses her research on the Wauja people in Brazil, why she chose Notre Dame, and how the anthropology program's emphasis on transdisciplinarity makes it distinctive.

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There will be singing: New echoes awaken in Notre Dame Stadium

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: Faculty News, Arts, Catholicism, Undergraduate News, General News, and Graduate Students

As with so much of life during the coronavirus pandemic, Notre Dame Stadium is operating under "business as unusual" — with choir rehearsals taking place in the Leahy Gate, near the south endzone. “Before now, the gate had been just a passageway and the only way to get from the first floor of O’Neill to other buildings,” said Mark Doerries, director of graduate studies and head of the graduate choral conducting program for Sacred Music at Notre Dame. “But now it holds rehearsals, classes and study space — a living incubator of music and teaching.”

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Notre Dame International Security Center embarks on a new wave of expansion 

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, Research, General News, and Graduate Students

Over the last three years, the Notre Dame International Security Center has added faculty and postdoctoral fellows, expanded its undergraduate and graduate programs, and become a thought leader on issues surrounding national security and innovative approaches to U.S. grand strategy. The center is now continuing to build on that success with $7.66 million in new grants, which will support naming Jim Webb, a former U.S. senator from Virginia and secretary of the Navy, as NDISC's inaugural distinguished fellow; creating a pre-doctoral fellowship program and expanding the current post-doctoral fellows program.

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The Inspiration Place: Writers and artists find space to create at Ireland's Kylemore Abbey

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: Arts, Internationalism, Undergraduate News, General News, and Graduate Students

At Kylemore Abbey in western Ireland, the presence of pure beauty overwhelms. A mere picture will not suffice; you must draw or write or paint. That’s the idea behind two summer programs that Notre Dame runs at the abbey in the Connemara mountains. The debut of a month-long graduate art residency last summer adds another option on top of a three-credit creative writing seminar that began in 2016. The 19 students spent the first week at the Dublin Global Gateway soaking in the city arts and lit scene, then spent the remainder at Kylemore Abbey, a 19th-century castle where Notre Dame has renovated a section for hosting guests.

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Twenty Arts and Letters students and alumni awarded Fulbright grants

Twenty-six University of Notre Dame students and alumni — including 20 from the College of Arts and Letters — have been awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants to teach or study abroad during the 2020-21 academic year. Notre Dame has been a top producer of Fulbright students for six consecutive years.

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How palm oil explains state-building in Colombia: A Q&A with political science Ph.D. candidate Camilo Neito-Matiz

What does palm oil — cheap, easy to produce, and endlessly versatile — explain about state-building in a region wracked by violence? Plenty, according to Ph.D. candidate Camilo Nieto-Matiz, a comparative political scientist who studies how states increase their capacity in subnational peripheries, poor areas with little state presence, in times of conflict. In other words, he examines how governments undertake fundamental tasks like providing security, collecting taxes, and building schools and roads ­— all of which are necessary for development, democracy, and political order.

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Peace studies and anthropology Ph.D. candidate named 2020 Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellow in Women’s Studies

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

Categories: Internationalism, Research, General News, and Graduate Students

Maryam Rokhideh, a Notre Dame doctoral candidate in peace studies and anthropology, has been named a 2020 Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellow in Women’s Studies. Ten highly-selective fellowships are awarded annually to humanities and social science Ph.D. candidates whose work addresses women’s and gender issues in interdisciplinary and original ways.

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