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Rock musician, producer Todd Rundgren to serve as artist-in-residence

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: Arts and General News

Singer, songwriter and producer Todd Rundgren will serve as an artist-in-residence for the Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT) at the University of Notre Dame from Sept. 22 to Oct. 1. During his residency, Rundgren will teach several classes, work with students and teachers in the South Bend/Mishawaka community, perform with student bands in a concert Oct. 1 at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, organize an on-campus collection of used musical instruments for national redistribution to music students in need and, in conjunction with his Spirit of Harmony Foundation, present an award to Notre Dame alumnus Bill Hurd.

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English professor wins ACLS fellowship to study medieval marginalia

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton studies medieval texts, many of them on sheepskins and fragile after hundreds of years in conditions not always suited for preservation. The Notre Dame Professor of English studies the margins of these medieval texts, which contain thoughts scrawled by some of the brightest minds of the time. They are a layer of interaction and understanding that Kerby-Fulton will spend the next year studying, supported by a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. 

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Scholar of Portuguese language, Brazilian culture joins Arts and Letters faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Marcio Bahia is coming to Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures with his eyes focused squarely on Brazil. A scholar of Brazilian culture and language, Bahia will join the College of Arts and Letters faculty this fall with a focus on accelerating the growth of the Portuguese program.

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Arts and Letters alumnus Patrick Vassel plays pivotal role in success of Hamilton

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Alumni, Arts, and General News

Political science major Patrick Vassel '07 didn’t come to Notre Dame dreaming of a career on Broadway. But a path that began with acting and directing in shows on campus has led him to New York's biggest stage. He's now associate director of Hamilton, the blockbuster musical that's won Tony Awards, a Grammy, and the Pulitzer Prize. Vassel has been a key figure in the show's development, working with actors and technicians night in and night out.

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LEO study on homelessness prevention published in Science

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

A study of the Homelessness Prevention Call Center in Chicago by the Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities found that such hotlines have a considerable effect on people facing homelessness, and that emergency financial assistance successfully prevents homelessness — if funding is available. The study, published in the Aug. 12 edition of Science, examines the impact of financial assistance for 4,500 individuals and families who called the HPCC between 2010 and 2012.

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Sustainability students cross disciplinary boundaries to address real-world issues

Author: Tessa Bangs

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

Notre Dame's sustainability program, open to all majors, seeks to inspire students to cultivate practices and ways of living that preserve natural resources for future generations. The minor is housed in the College of Science, but it has proven to be an ideal way for Arts and Letters students to connect their interest in science with their passion for the humanities.

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Video: 2016 seniors reflect on their liberal arts education

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Alumni, General News, and Undergraduate News

Congratulations to the Class of 2016! This video, screened at the Arts and Letters Diploma Ceremony, features several seniors reflecting on their time at Notre Dame and in the College of Arts and Letters. "The College of Arts and Letters has really given me this great base that has allowed me to think and critically reflect on what kind of life I want to live," said Seamus Ronan, a political science and peace studies major. "I feel prepared for whatever life brings my way."

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Three Questions with Latino Theologian Peter J. Casarella

Peter Casarella

Peter Casarella, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame and interim director of Latin American/North American Church Concerns (LANACC), is a scholar of Latino theology. Before joining the Notre Dame faculty in 2013, he served as professor of Catholic studies at DePaul University where he was director of the Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology. In an interview, he discusses his research, Pope Francis, and the future of Latin American/North American Church Concerns, of which he is interim director.

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Sociology and Gender Studies Major Named Gilman Scholar

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: General News, National Fellowships, and Undergraduate News

Gilman Scholarship

Notre Dame student Stephen “Pete” Freeman, a sociology and gender studies major, has been selected to receive the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, to study or intern abroad during the 2016-2017 academic year. Gilman Scholars receive up to $5,000 to apply toward their study abroad or internship program costs. The program aims to diversify the students who study and intern abroad and the countries and regions where they go.

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Global Affairs Scholar to Join Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs, Department of Sociology

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Internationalism

Tamara Kay

Tamara Kay, a scholar with extensive experience in Latin America and Africa, will join the new Keough School of Global Affairs as associate professor of global affairs, according to Scott Appleby, Marilyn Keough Dean of the Keough School. Kay will hold a joint appointment in the Notre Dame Department of Sociology.

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Three Questions with Political Philosopher Patrick Deneen

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Patrick Deneen

A member of the University of Notre Dame political science faculty since 2012, Patrick Deneen is the David A. Potenziani Memorial Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies. He teaches and writes about the history of political thought, American political thought, religion and politics, and literature and politics. Books he has published on these subjects include The Odyssey of Political Theory, Democratic Faith, Democracy’s Literature, The Democratic Soul, and Redeeming Democracy in America.

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In Memoriam: Bernard E. Doering, Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages and Literatures

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Faculty News and General News

Bernard Doering

Bernard E. Doering, professor emeritus of Romance languages and literatures at the University of Notre Dame, died July 9. He was 91. A member of the Notre Dame faculty since 1965, Doering became a popular and affectionately regarded teacher and mentor. Among the pioneers of the University’s international studies programs, he played an indispensable role in establishing and developing the Notre Dame program in Angers, France.

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Summer Events Continue Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival’s Celebration of the Bard's Legacy

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Arts and General News

Shakespeare: 1616-2016

This summer the 2016 Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival is continuing its celebration of the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death with numerous theatrical events. Shakespearean actors of all ages from throughout the Michiana area will take the Washington Hall stage for performances of “ShakeScenes” July 16 and July 17. From July 17 through August 22, the Festival’s Young Company will perform Shakespeare’s Pericles, Prince of Tyre at outdoor venues throughout Michiana. And 14 performances of Shakespeare’s The Tempest will take place August 16-28 at Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

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Center for Theology, Science and Human Flourishing Appoints New Assistant Director

Author: Katie Zakas Rutledge

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Terrence Ehrman

The Center for Theology, Science and Human Flourishing at the University of Notre Dame has named Rev. Terrence P. Ehrman, C.S.C., its assistant director of life sciences research and outreach. Ehrman will expand the center’s portfolio of life sciences research projects and oversee the center’s outreach efforts across campus and more broadly.

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Video: Meet Spanish Major Nick Nissen

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Undergraduate News

Nick Nissen Icon

“The focus of your education should be on trying to open your doors to a more international understanding of the world, and I think the Spanish major does an amazing job in preparing us for that,” said Nick Nissen ’16, a Spanish major in the College of Arts and Letters. Studying Spanish at Notre Dame provides students with the skills needed to fully experience the Spanish-speaking world. Students learn the language while also studying literature and culture to better understand the historical and social contexts of the 400 million native Spanish speakers around the world.

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Three Questions with Political Science Associate Professor Christina Wolbrecht

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Christina-Wolbrecht-release

Christina Wolbrecht, associate professor of political science, C. Robert and Margaret Hanley Family Director of the Notre Dame Washington Program, and director of the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy at the University of Notre Dame, teaches and writes about American politics, political parties, women and politics, and American political development. Now at work on a study of the first 100 years of women as voters in American politics, she is co-author, with J. Kevin Corder, of the recently published book Counting Women’s Ballots: Female Voters from Suffrage through the New Deal.

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Historian Wins Phi Beta Kappa Award for Book on Philology

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Phi Beta Kappa

For his book pulling together the complex history of philology and how Western humanistic learning split into the modern humanities that we know today, Notre Dame historian James Turner has received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award. The honor is given for books in literary scholarship or criticism and is named for a distinguished Princeton University scholar, teacher, and dean. Turner’s book, Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities, looks at how learned researchers once included languages, history, and texts in a single broad field of study that came to be known as philology.

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Liberal Studies Professor and Medieval Institute Faculty Affiliate Wins Olivia Remie Constable Prize

Author: Megan J. Hall

Categories: General News

Robichaud Icon

Denis Robichaud, an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, has been awarded the 2016 Olivia Remie Constable Prize in Medieval Studies for study at the University of Oxford this summer. The prize was established last year by Robert M. Conway to honor Remie Constable, the former director of Notre Dame's Medieval Institute, and was held last summer by Kent Emery Jr., a professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, who completed work for an ongoing multi-person Duns Scotus edition. Robichaud studies 15th-century history and philosophy, and particularly Marsilio Ficino.

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Video: William Collins Donahue on the Resonance of Small Moments in Holocaust Literature

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

William Collins Donahue

“Early literary encounters with the Holocaust tended to tell you about the whole event, but now when the Holocaust appears, generally speaking, it appears in small moments, in kind of passing glances,” said William Collins Donahue, the John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities and chair of the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures at the University of Notre Dame. Donahue has researched extensively in the areas of literary realism and modernism, especially the work of Elias Canetti. Now focusing primarily on Holocaust literature, Donahue is developing an analogy for how the Holocaust appears in contemporary narratives. These small episodes, Donahue said, are similar to the Stolpersteine, a worldwide movement of small pavement stones, each commemorating a victim in the Holocaust.

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Video: Theology Professor Khaled Anatolios on Studying the Origins of Christian Doctrines

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Khaled Anatolios Icon

“I tend to gravitate towards doctrines that seem inexplicable, and I try to understand what motivated the early Christians to formulate these doctrines in just these ways,” said Khaled Anatolios, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. Anatolios specializes in the theology of the early Church. As a Byzantine Catholic priest, he has a special interest in the doctrines of the Greek fathers as well as complementary ideas between the Eastern and Western traditions. His current research focuses on the doctrine of salvation, particularly the disconnect between classical sources and modern experience.

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Seven Arts and Letters Students Awarded Graduate Fellowships from National Science Foundation

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, National Fellowships, Research, and Undergraduate News

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Seven students in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have been awarded graduate fellowships from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for 2016. Another six have been recognized with honorable mentions. The NSF’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) honors and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based degrees in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and social science disciplines. The award provides a stipend, tuition support, and research funds for three years.

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Theology, Arts and Letters Pre-Health Major Wins Greenspan Student Voice of Mental Health Award

Author: Ann Hastings

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Maggie Skoch

Maggie Skoch, a 2016 graduate of the University of Notre Dame, was recognized as this year’s Jerry Greenspan Student Voice of Mental Health Award recipient at The Jed Foundation’s annual gala in New York City on June 7. The prestigious annual award honors a student who has reduced prejudice around mental illness, raised awareness of mental health issues on campus, and encouraged help-seeking among their peers. Skoch, an Arts and Letters pre-health and theology graduate from Mentor, Ohio, will attend the Stritch School of Medicine at Loyola University in Chicago to pursue a career in psychiatry.

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Video: Theology Professor Robin Jensen on Understanding Early Christian Art and Architecture

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Robin Jensen

“It’s my conviction that the best way to know about how early Christians worshipped — even what they believed — is to try to get as much information as we can about where they lived and what they saw, not just what they wrote and what they read,” said Robin Jensen, the Patrick O’Brien Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. Jensen researches topics at the intersections of Christian art, architecture, liturgy, and theology. Her forthcoming book examines the history of the cross from a variety of liturgical and social perspectives, both in ancient times and in contemporary culture.

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Video: Political Science Major and Glynn Scholar Delivers 2016 Valedictory Address

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Abby Davis

Abby Davis, a political science major from Avon Lake, Ohio, was named valedictorian of the 2016 University of Notre Dame graduating class and gave the valedictory address during the 171st University Commencement Ceremony on May 15 at Notre Dame Stadium. See the video or read the transcript of her speech here.

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CEC Director to Deliver Inaugural Law & Justice Lecture at University of Florence

Author: Kenneth Hallenius

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Internationalism

O. Carter Snead

Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture director and professor of law Carter Snead will deliver the inaugural University of Florence “Law and Justice Lecture” on May 30 in Florence, Italy. His lecture, “Three Regulatory Models for Stem Cell Research,” will analyze and contrast the U.S. government’s federal funding policies under Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama as a means of exploring the complexities of American governance of science, medicine, and biotechnology in the name of ethical goods.

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Philosophy Major Wins Naughton Fellowship to Conduct Research in Ireland

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

campus_dome

Michelle Kim, a philosophy major, has won a 2016 Naughton Fellowship, which allows students with a background in, or aptitude for, STEM fields to experience international research and educational opportunities through a funded exchange program involving the University of Notre Dame and some of Ireland’s leading research universities. With the award, Kim will complete undergraduate research at Trinity College Dublin.

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How Studying Philosophy Guides Alumna’s Work as a Hollywood Film Director

Author: Bianca Almada

Categories: Alumni and General News

Anne Hamilton

Anne Hamilton ’04 didn’t always know she wanted to be a filmmaker. She majored in philosophy in the College of Arts and Letters, but plans change, and now Hamilton is one of Hollywood’s up-and-coming directors. She recently signed with William Morris Endeavor after the successful world premiere of American Fable, a feature film she wrote, directed, and co-produced. The film made its debut at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, in March and received a string of excellent reviews.

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Nature and Nurture Are Both Important, Anthropologist Argues in New Journal Article

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Agustín Fuentes

Evolutionary science stresses the contributions biology makes to our behavior. Some anthropologists try to understand how societies and histories construct our identities, and others ask about how genes and the environment do the same thing. Which is the better approach? Both are needed, Notre Dame biological anthropologist Agustín Fuentes argues in a forthcoming paper in the journal Current Anthropology.

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