Latest News

Latest News » General News

Notre Dame Kennedy Scholars Present Research Proposals at Durham University

Author: Rina Buznea

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Undergraduate News

London Centre

On April 15, four students participating in the College of Arts and Letters and Notre Dame International’s Kennedy Scholars Thesis Seminar were invited to present their research proposals at Durham University, before a jury of faculty members and graduate students. With constructive feedback from the jury and new insight gathered from Durham’s world-renowned libraries and archives, the Kennedy Scholars will hone their senior thesis proposals and apply for Kennedy Family Undergraduate Research Fellowships through the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts.

Read More

Arts and Letters Faculty Win Grants from Notre Dame Research

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Great Hall windows

Notre Dame Research has provided awards to more than a dozen College of Arts and Letters faculty members from its Internal Grants Program for 2016. The grant awardees spanned the University in four program categories: Faculty Research Support (Initiation), Faculty Research Support (Regular), Equipment Restoration and Renewal, and Library Acquisitions.

Read More

13 Arts and Letters Faculty Honored For Exemplary Work in Undergraduate Teaching

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, and General News

The golden dome

Eleven faculty members from the College of Arts and Letters have won 2016 Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and two have been honored with Dockweiler Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. The awards are presented by the Office of the Provost, and the recipients are selected through a process that includes peer and student nominations.

Read More

Seniors Teresa Kennedy and Connor Hayes to Receive 2016 Yarrow Award in Peace Studies

2016 Yarrow Award Winners

Notre Dame seniors Teresa Kennedy and Connor Hayes have been selected to receive the 2016 Yarrow Award from the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Kennedy, an anthropology and peace studies major from Wilbraham, Massachusetts, and Hayes, a political science and peace studies major from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, will accept their awards at the Kroc Institute’s undergraduate recognition ceremony on May 13.

Read More

Record Fulbright Award year led by 24 Arts and Letters students

Fulbright logo icon

Twenty-four Notre Dame students who study in the College of Arts and Letters have received 2016-17 grants from the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program, offering students grants to conduct research, study, and teach abroad. The total number of finalists from Arts and Letters alone surpasses the previous University-wide Fulbright record of 17, set last year. In all, 30 Notre Dame students were named Fulbright finalists for 2016-17.

Read More

Political Science, Peace Studies Associate Professor Wins Grant to Study War's Hidden Costs

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Tanisha Fazal

Tanisha Fazal, associate professor of political science and peace studies, has been awarded a research grant from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation to investigate the human and financial costs of war. Those costs are escalating, she says, despite a reduced fatality count.

Read More

Notre Dame, Holy Cross lead transformational liberal arts education program at Indiana prison

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Graduate Students

Driven by a commitment to Catholic social teaching and a strong belief that a liberal arts education can transform lives, Notre Dame and Holy Cross College faculty are teaching college-level courses for inmates at Indiana's Westville Correctional Facility. Since 2013, nearly 100 inmates have earned college credit and 11 have earned associate degrees as of this month. But developing a strong foundation in reading, writing, research, public speaking, and critical thinking offers benefits that go far beyond the professional opportunities a degree might one day provide.

Read More

Guggenheim Foundation awards fellowships to two Arts and Letters professors

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Notre Dame seal

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has awarded two of its prestigious 2016 fellowships to faculty in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters. The fellowships, which fund a diverse group scholars, artists, and scientists, will go to Anjan Chakravartty, a professor in the Department of Philosophy, and Stephen Fallon, the Rev. John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities in the Program of Liberal Studies and the Department of English.

Read More

Professor Launches Project to Advance Scientific and Theological Literacy Among Madrasa Graduates in India

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Ebrahim E.I. Moosa

With a $1.2 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation, Ebrahim Moosa, professor of Islamic studies at the University of Notre Dame, has launched a three-year project to enrich scientific and theological literacy among recent graduates of Islamic seminaries in India.

Read More

Major New Book on Franz Schubert Dedicated to Music Professor

Author: Noelle Elliott

Categories: Arts, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Susan Youens

A major new book of essays on the music of the early 19th-century composer Franz Schubert, Schubert’s Late Music: History, Theory, Style, is dedicated to to Susan Youens, J. W. Van Gorkom Professor of Music at the University of Notre Dame. Published by Cambridge University Press and edited by Lorraine Byrne Bodley and Julian Horton, the anthology features essays from Youens and other top scholars in the field.

Read More

Graduate Students Gain Experience Editing Sociology’s Flagship Journal

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, and Research

American Sociological Review

Notre Dame sociology graduate students are getting a rare inside look at the academic publishing process—and valuable experience that will give them an edge in their own research and careers. The students serve as assistant and coordinating editors of the American Sociological Review (ASR)—the flagship journal of the American Sociological Association (ASA)—under the direction of Professor Omar Lizardo, Professor Rory McVeigh, and Professor Sarah Mustillo.

Read More

Notre Dame Juniors Caleb Pine and Christa Grace Watkins Named 2016 Truman Scholars

2016 Truman Scholars

Two juniors in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters, Caleb “C.J.” Pine and Christa Grace Watkins, have been named 2016 Truman Scholars. Established in 1975 as a living memorial to President Harry S. Truman, the prestigious scholarship includes $30,000 in graduate study funds, priority admission and supplemental financial aid at select institutions, leadership training, career and graduate school counseling, and internship opportunities within the federal government. Just 54 college juniors have been selected as Truman Scholars this year from a pool of 775 nominees. Six Arts and Letters students have received the Truman Scholarship since 2010.

Read More

English Honors Colloquium Brings Support, Collaboration to Senior Thesis Projects

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Research, and Undergraduate News

English Honors Colloquium

When Elizabeth Troyer began diving into her senior thesis research, she wasn’t alone. She was one of 17 seniors in Notre Dame’s Department of English honors concentration—all of whom participated in a colloquium as they embarked on their senior thesis projects. Students in the class discussed their thesis research in small groups, offered feedback, completed outlines and bibliographies, and shared presentations on their main ideas with the class. It’s just one example of how faculty members have worked to build a sense of community in the department and in the honors concentration.

Read More

Why Majoring in English Made Patrick Lyons ’08 a Better Doctor

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Alumni and General News

Patrick Lyons Icon

Dr. Patrick Lyons ’08 doesn’t ask his patients if they have questions when he’s finished talking with them about a diagnosis. There’s a good chance they’ll say no. Instead, he asks what questions they have. Looking at how he practices medicine now, especially in his interactions with patients, Lyons realizes his time as an English major had a profound effect on how he communicates. “English prepared me well because I have the ability to think critically and organize and analyze the information in front of me,” he said. “Word choice and the way you’re addressing patients can be really powerful.”

Read More

Notre Dame Philosopher to Deliver 2017 Gifford Lectures at the University of St. Andrews

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Michael Rea

Michael Rea, a professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Philosophy, has been named the 2017 speaker for the prestigious Gifford Lectures at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. The 128-year-old lecture series, described as “the highest honor in a philosopher’s career,” invites pre-eminent thinkers to address topics related to religion, science, and philosophy. In a series of six lectures, Rea will take a theologically informed approach to the topic of “divine hiddenness,” the idea that God’s existence is far less evident—and vivid, unambiguous experience of God’s presence is much less frequent—than one might expect from a perfectly loving deity.

Read More

Five Arts and Letters Students Recognized for Outstanding Leadership

Author: Ann Hastings

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

campus_dome

The University of Notre Dame’s Division of Student Affairs honored five students—Maggie Skoch, Colleen McLinden, Preston Igwe, Meredith Fraser, and Maggie Bowers—from the College of Arts and Letters at its 30th-annual Student Leadership Awards Banquet on April 7. These annual awards recognize current students who have made exceptional contributions to the Notre Dame community.

Read More

Sociology Majors Find Continued Success in Top Graduate Programs

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: Alumni, General News, and Undergraduate News

the_globe

About 28 percent of recent Notre Dame sociology majors go on to graduate or professional school, according to data from The Career Center’s First Destination reports. Some pursue advanced degrees in law or medicine, but others—like Annalise Loehr ’09 (Indiana University) and Maryann Erigha ’07 (University of Pennsylvania)—enroll in prestigious sociology Ph.D. programs. It’s a trend that continues with the Class of 2016, as sociology majors Shannon Sheehan (University of Michigan) and Nicolette Bardele (Harvard University) plan to begin graduate programs in sociology this fall.

Read More

Post-Doctoral Fellow Researches How Literary Prizes Shape Public Reading Habits

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: Alumni, General News, and Graduate Students

Kara Donnelly

Kara Donnelly wants to know why you read what you read. Many people pick up a book because they heard it was great, either from a friend or through the media. But how did they know? Who is it that makes the decisions about which books are worth our time?Donnelly, a post-doctoral fellow in Notre Dame’s Department of English who completed her Ph.D. in 2015, has researched British literature from the 1950s to the present trying to find answers to those questions. Her scholarship has focused largely on the Man Booker Prize, which recognizes excellence in fiction writing published in Britain.

Read More

Two Arts and Letters faculty win ACLS fellowships

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Notre Dame seal

Two faculty members from Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have won 2016 fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, the Notre Dame Professor of English, will pursue a book project that explores the notes that medieval readers made in the margins of historic texts and books in order to rediscover sophisticated early reading practices for understanding the self. Christopher Ball, an assistant professor of anthropology, will spend time with an indigenous tribe in Brazil studying local history and culture through connections between language and nearby rivers.

Read More

Kearney Wins Essay Award for Research on ‘Sparkle’ in Girls’ Media

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Mary Celeste Kearney

About seven years ago, Mary Celeste Kearney began noticing how much “sparkle” had become part of girls’ culture—in makeup and clothing, as well as in girl-oriented media. She began compiling a “taxonomy of sparkle” in contemporary films and TV series to explore its sociocultural significance. The resulting essay, “Sparkle: Luminosity and Post-Girl Power Media,” has been honored with the Katherine Singer Kovács Essay Award from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies.

Read More

Faculty Comment on Pope Francis' Letter, 'Amoris Laetitia'

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, and General News

Pope Francis

Pope Francis released his apostolic exhortation “Amoris Laetitia” (“The Joy of Love”) in Rome on April 8. The document addresses such areas of Catholic Church doctrine as the admission of divorced and remarried Catholics to the sacrament of the Eucharist, same-sex relationships and cohabitation, all issues that arose, often controversially, during the Synod of Bishops in Rome in October. Here is what some people on the Notre Dame faculty are saying and thinking about “Amoris Laetitia.”

Read More

Professor Illuminates Impact of English Language By Focusing on How It’s Used

Author: Fred Bauters

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Tim Machan

Tim Machan believes the English language is far more than the order of letters and words. It’s the highly personal, situational expressions we use to convey our ideas and feelings. It’s how we connect with or distance ourselves from everyone around us. We use it to define ourselves. Machan, a professor in Notre Dame’s Department of English, has spent 30 years researching and teaching English in its many forms and functions. His journey has pulled him further from grammatical conventions into how people around the world use English in their daily lives.

Read More

Video: Learning Korean During a Summer in Seoul

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Internationalism, and Undergraduate News

sla_allison_emeott_icon

Notre Dame junior Allison Emeott didn’t just study Korean this summer. She was immersed in it. “You get to use what you learn and talk to people,” she said. “It’s really inspiring because when you’re surrounded by people speaking a language, you want to learn more and you just want to become a part of the community." Emeott, an applied mathematics and Asian studies major, spent the summer of 2015 intensively studying in Seoul, South Korea. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures in the College of Arts and Letters, she received a grant from the Summer Language Abroad program, which provides funding up to $5,500 for individual summer foreign language study abroad.

Read More

Anthropology and Peace Studies Graduate Student Examines Youth Participation in Colombia’s Peace-Building Movements

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

lederach_icon

The young people of war-torn northern Colombia want their homes and their lifestyle back. Displaced from their villages by guerilla and paramilitary groups, they have spent the last 10 years in urban centers—making them prime targets for recruitment by those same criminal enterprises. But rather than falling prey to a violent cause, they’ve founded a successful peace-building movement. Notre Dame Ph.D. student Angela Lederach ’07 wants to know why. She’s spent the last two summers living in Cartagena, Colombia, researching the Peaceful Movement of the Alta Montaña, and plans to return in August for at least a year to continue researching the organization for her dissertation.

Read More

Sociologist Focuses Research on Immigration Policy in the South

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Jennifer Jones

Jennifer Jones, an assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology, has received the Presidential Authority Award grant from the Russell Sage Foundation for her study of interracial coalitions and their effect on immigration policy in Mississippi and Alabama. Combining archival and media sources with interviews, “Enforcement or Embrace? The Determinants of State-Level Immigration Policy in New Immigrant Destinations” emerged from unexpected patterns Jones identified while researching race relations and immigration in North Carolina.

Read More

Video: Students Learn Chinese Through Immersive Summer Language Program

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, Internationalism, and Undergraduate News

China Summer Language Program

“Studying Chinese opens the doors to different ways of thinking,” said junior John Fox. “It helped a lot to be able to come here and study abroad this summer and to experience such a great city.” Fox was one of several Notre Dame students to participate in the 2015 China Summer Language Program through the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures in the College of Arts and Letters. Students honed their Chinese language skills at Peking University in Beijing, both in the classroom and one-on-one with an instructor. Students in the program typically advance the equivalent of one full year of study in just eight weeks.

Read More

Theology Professor Wins Fellowship to Spend Year Researching in Jerusalem

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Gary Anderson

Gary Anderson, Hesburgh Professor of Catholic Theology at Notre Dame, will spend a year in Jerusalem working with an international group of scholars to better understand how early Jews, Christians, and Muslims read, understood, and interpreted the stories told in the Bible’s early chapters. Anderson is part of a team of scholars from North America, Israel, and Europe accepted this fall to conduct research at the Israel Institute for Advanced Studies at Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

Read More