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Theology Doctoral Students Win International Honors

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

Three Ph.D. candidates in the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Theology have recently been awarded prestigious fellowships from organizations such as the American Academy in Rome, Harvard University’s Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, the Dolores Zorhab Liebmann Foundation, and the Louisville Institute.

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"The Secret in the Wings" to be Performed at Notre Dame

Author: Chris Sopczynski

Categories: General News

The University of Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) will present Mary Zimmerman’s drama The Secret in the Wings September 30, October 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7 at 7:30 p.m., with matinee performances on October 1, 2, and 9 at 2:30 p.m., in the Philbin Studio Theatre of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

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New Graduate Minor Focuses on Screen Culture

Author: Susan Love Loughmiller

Categories: General News, Arts, and Faculty News

There is growing recognition in academia that “screen literacy” is a valuable asset for many scholars—especially those who teach language and literature. To help develop this skill set, the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) has created a new graduate minor in screen cultures. It is open to students in any Notre Dame graduate program.

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New History Faculty Share Colonial Interests

Author: Mark Shuman

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The Department of History’s two newest faculty members share a common interest in colonialism, although their research has led them to explore this issue in different parts of the globe. Rebecca Tinio McKenna, whose research has focused on the Philippines, and Paul Ocobock, a scholar of Africa, both join the University of Notre Dame as assistant professors this fall.

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Philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre Honored for Book’s Lasting Influence

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News and Faculty News

The American Political Science Association recently honored University of Notre Dame philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre for his influential 1981 book After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory (University of Notre Dame Press). MacIntyre, the Rev. John A. O’Brien Senior Research Professor of Philosophy (emeritus), received the association’s biennial Benjamin E. Lippincott Award, which recognizes “a work of exceptional quality by a living political theorist” that is still considered significant at least 15 years after its original publication.

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David Campbell Receives Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

David Campbell, John Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C., Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, and Robert Putnam of Harvard University are the 2011 recipients of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award for their book American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us. The American Political Science Association awards the prize annually to the best book from the past year on government, politics, or international affairs.

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Economist James Sullivan Says Census Poverty Measures Misleading

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

On Sept. 13, the U.S. Census Bureau will release official poverty estimates for 2010, and those numbers are likely to be higher than last year’s staggering 14.3 percent poverty rate for 2009. However, Census poverty figures are based on a narrow measure of income that often doesn’t accurately reflect an individual’s true economic circumstances, according to James Sullivan, associate professor in the University of Notre Dame Department of Economics.

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Historian Gail Bederman Invited to Institute for Advanced Study

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Associate Professor Gail Bederman is the latest faculty member in Notre Dame’s Department of History to accept a prestigious invitation to the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey, one of the world’s leading centers for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. Only about 190 scholars are chosen each year for membership at the institute; more than 1,500 typically apply.

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Notre Dame Alumni Honored

Author: Liam Farrell '04

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Catholicism

The Notre Dame Alumni Association recognized three Notre Dame graduates last week, including College of Arts and Letters alumni Haley Scott DeMaria ’95, and Rev. David Garcia ’74 M.T.S., ’84 M.S.A., and Mendoza College of Business Alumnus Lt. Cmdr. Robert L. Miller, Sr. ’42, ’47 J.D. USNR (Ret.).

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A History of Washington Hall—and of Notre Dame

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News and Faculty News

There was a time when the size of the University of Notre Dame’s faculty and student body, the integrity of the University’s community, the enthusiasms of its students, and the very culture in which it was embedded all made it possible, in theater historian Mark C. Pilkinton’s succinct phrase, “for everyone to attend everything.”

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Teaching Film and Screen Culture Across the Humanities

Author: Susan Love Loughmiller

Categories: General News and Faculty News

The new chair of Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television, and Theatre spends part of each summer teaching his specialty to a different type of students—fellow faculty members from the College of Arts and Letters. Professor Jim Collins, who specializes in media theory, postmodern studies, and digital humanities, created a weeklong seminar five years ago to help faculty from other departments better incorporate film into the classroom.

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“Great Books” Program Alumna Makes Underwater Literary Discovery

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News and Alumni

A graduate of Notre Dame’s Program of Liberal Studies, Kelly Gleason ’98 was leading a team of maritime archeologists on a research expedition some 600 miles northwest of Honolulu when they discovered a gem of maritime—and literary—history: the resting place of a ship called the Two Brothers, which wrecked on a reef in 1823. The ill-fated Nantucket ship was captained by George Pollard Jr., whose earlier whaling vessel, the Essex, was rammed by a whale and sunk in 1820, inspiring author Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick.

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FTT Internships Offer Inside Look at Industry Careers

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Arts

Meet the Press. Steppenwolf Theatre Company. NBCUniversal. MTV. National Geographic. The Jimmy Kimmel Show. CNN. Entertainment One. NFL Films. Television stations from coast to coast. These are just some of the places where students in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) intern as undergraduates, developing industry experience, making invaluable contacts, and getting exposure to a wide variety of career opportunities.

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Fulbright Foreign Language Teachers Arrive for Orientation

Categories: General News and Internationalism

The University of Notre Dame will host its sixth annual Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistantship (FLTA) orientation for the coming academic year, bringing foreign language teachers from 30 countries to campus Aug. 11 to 15 (Tuesday to Saturday) for a series of workshops designed to enhance their teaching in the United States.

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Alumnus Choreographs Own Career

Author: Andrew Vanden Bossche

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Arts

Jason Laws is a man who writes his own story. When the job he wanted didn’t exist, he created it. Since receiving his political science degree from the University of Notre Dame in 2007, Laws has built a successful career in Chicago as a commercial choreographer, creative director and producer. He’s also carved a niche for himself creating flash mobs—a concept that wasn’t even invented until 2003.

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Anthropologist Agustín Fuentes Explains “Planet of the Apes” Fascination

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Rise of the Planet of the Apes, opening nationwide Friday, is expected to be a summer blockbuster. So what’s the fascination with apes taking over? Why not Planet of the Dogs or Planet of the Seagulls? “The lure of the Planet of the Apes movies lies in our fascination with the possibility that we are not the only sentient beings on earth,” says University of Notre Dame anthropologist Agustin Fuentes, who specializes in human evolution and primatology.

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