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Ukrainian Byzantine priest and theology Ph.D. candidate leads prayer service at Basilica of the Sacred Heart in solidarity with Ukraine

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Catholicism

In a show of solidarity with Ukraine, a prayer service for the people of Ukraine was held Monday evening at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. The Basilica was filled to capacity for the vigil, led by Father Andrij Hlabse, S.J., a theology doctoral candidate and Ukrainian Byzantine Catholic priest. Father Hlabse welcomed the congregation in English, Ukrainian, and Russian, expressing solidarity with the people of Ukraine. He then reflected on his time as an undergraduate at Notre Dame when he would look to the Golden Dome and pray. He noted the numerous golden domes that likewise adorn many churches in Ukraine. 

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College of Arts & Letters launches Sheedy Family Program in Economy, Enterprise & Society, a selective program focused on finding meaning in business through the liberal arts

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Undergraduate News, General News, and Faculty News

Notre Dame’s College of Arts & Letters is launching a new selective program that will offer specialized coursework, programming, and resources for undergraduates interested in finding deeper meaning in the practice of business through the liberal arts. The Sheedy Family Program in Economy, Enterprise & Society is a rigorous academic experience and collaborative community focused on helping students form strong bonds as they engage in exclusive classes, independent research, meaningful dialogue, and purpose-driven career discernment. The cohort-based program is open to Arts & Letters students with a minor in business economics or a Mendoza College of Business minor, or Mendoza majors who have a major, supplemental major, or minor in Arts & Letters.

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Video: What is the Italian major like at Notre Dame?

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, and General News

Italian majors pursue their passions while developing skills such as language proficiency, intercultural competence, critical thinking, and analysis. "You realize that you're not only speaking a different language, but you're thinking in a completely different way, and it teaches you to really be able to express yourself really well," said Italian major Erik Verhey.

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International impact: A&L students' research plays role in State Department sanctioning corrupt foreign officials

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Faculty News

Two groups of Notre Dame students — one affiliated with the Washington Program and the other with the nonpartisan Student Policy Network — did significant research on allegations against two Maltese officials and the daughter of the former Angolan president, which they submitted to the Departments of State and Treasury in 2020. It's rare for undergraduates to be involved in such significant legal work — and in December, the State Department issued sanctions against all three officials the Notre Dame students spent an "immense amount of time" researching.

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Political scientist Aníbal Pérez-Liñán named director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies

Author: Karen Clay

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, a professor of political science and global affairs at the University of Notre Dame, has been named director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies in the Keough School of Global Affairs effective July 1. An accomplished teacher and widely cited scholar of processes of democratization, political instability, and the rule of law in new democracies, he has a strong international reputation as a leading expert on Latin American democracy.

 

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Video: The German major at Notre Dame

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, and General News

German majors pursue their passions while developing skills such as language proficiency, cultural empathy, communication, and analysis. "The really cool thing about the German major is how variable the classes are and how customizable they are, too," said Andrew Fulwider, a German major at Notre Dame. "You can take history classes, literature classes, arts classes, and current events classes."

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Liberal arts education helps economics major develop agency, confidence, and clear focus — as well as the skills to launch a tech startup

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Undergraduate News and General News

In the early days of the pandemic, when students of all ages were learning at home, Notre Dame senior Renee Yaseen noticed how much her 10-year-old brother, Daniel, missed his friends. Since they couldn’t get together to play, they played online games — for hours. So she started brainstorming ways to help him be more physically active while safely and meaningfully interacting with his friends online. The result: FriendOver, a startup that is harnessing computer vision technology (artificial intelligence that enables computers to process images and videos in the way people do) and machine learning to promote goodness in gaming.

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Creative writing faculty member’s debut novel spotlights devastation of Hurricane Maria

Author: Oliver Ortega & Brittany Blagburn

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Centers and Institutes, and Arts

It’s been five years since Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico. The grief, trauma, and political ramifications of this seismic event in the island’s history are skillfully rendered in Xavier Navarro Aquino’s new novel, Velorio. It’s a powerful debut for Navarro Aquino, an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Notre Dame and a faculty fellow at the Institute for Latino Studies.

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Romance languages and anthropology faculty win Humanities Without Walls grant to create program for Latinx women to share childbirth experiences through art and literature

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, General News, and Faculty News

Two faculty in Notre Dame’s College of Arts & Letters have won a three-year grant from Humanities Without Walls in support of a project that will encourage Latinx women who have suffered violence during pregnancy and childbirth to share their experiences through art and literature. Led by Vanesa Miseres, an associate professor of Spanish, and Vania Smith-Oka, an associate professor of anthropology, the project seeks to empower Latinx mothers in the South Bend area who often experience disrespect or abuse by medical professionals throughout the birthing process to share their stories through creative expression.

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The routine of a researcher: Meghan Sullivan, philosopher

Author: Meghan Sullivan, Brandi Wampler, and Joanne Fahey

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Meet Meghan Sullivan. She’s intense, goal-directed, funny (she hopes), and of course, philosophical. She also says that she’s direct to a fault, yet writes long emails. Most know her as the Wilsey Family College Professor of Philosophy and creator of the popular Notre Dame course God and the Good Life. In her own words, learn more about her and how she finds time to write, why she chose to be a philosopher, the importance of coffee for her survival, and more.

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Notre Dame historian, architecture scholar wins Silvers-Dudley Prize honoring nearly three decades of excellence in arts writing

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, and Faculty News

Ingrid D. Rowland, a professor in Department of History and School of Architecture, is one of three winners of the inaugural Grace Dudley Prize for Arts Writing. The award was among the Silvers-Dudley Prizes — named after the late Robert B. Silvers and his partner, the late Lady Grace Dudley — given to nine writers, including The New Yorker’s theatre critic, The New York Times’ critic at large, and journalists from Mexico, Germany, and Sudan. Rowland, who is based at Notre Dame's Rome Global Gateway, was commended for “extraordinary career-long achievement writing at the highest possible level on, in particular, Italian Renaissance art and culture, with such power, penetration, grace, and style.”

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Ernest Morrell, A&L associate dean and literacy scholar, elected to the National Academy of Education

Author: Theo Helm

Categories: General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Ernest Morrell, the associate dean for the humanities and equity in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and the director of the Center for Literacy Education, has been elected to the National Academy of Education. The Academy advances high-quality research that improves education quality and practice. Members are elected on the basis of outstanding scholarship related to education.

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Psychologist Darcia Narvaez named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Darcia Narvaez, a Notre Dame professor emerita in the Department of Psychology, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the largest international body of professional scientists in the world and publisher of the prestigious journal Science. Narvaez is being honored for her distinguished contributions illuminating typical and atypical development in terms of well-being, morality and sustainable wisdom. A total of 39 Notre Dame faculty members are now AAAS fellows.

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Experiencing joy: Department of Irish Language and Literature’s new 1-credit dance and tin-whistle courses give Notre Dame students the ‘keys to unlock Irish culture’

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Arts

For 75 minutes every fall Tuesday afternoon, junior Grace Ryan steps, slides, marches, smiles, and laughs. The business analytics major who’s pursuing a career in aerospace was hesitant to sign up for an Irish dance course given her already busy schedule, but she eventually agreed to try it out. Now she’s hooked — and that combination of having fun while becoming proficient in Irish traditions is exactly why the Department of Irish Language and Literature began offering 1-credit old-style Irish dancing [course] and tin whistle courses this year.

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Psychologist's study finds supportive early childhood environments can help decrease effects of trauma

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, General News, and Faculty News

Researchers know that experiencing a high number of adverse events in childhood correlates with worse health outcomes in adulthood. These studies have led to an emphasis on trauma-informed practice in schools and workplaces in an attempt to mitigate the harm of early adversity. At the other end of the spectrum, focusing on wellness, Darcia Narvaez, emerita professor of psychology, has helped identify humanity’s baseline for childhood care. In a first-of-its-kind study conducted by Narvaez and doctoral student Mary Tarsha and published in the journal Anxiety, Stress and Coping, results show that positive childhood experiences can help buffer the effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on physiological health in adult women.

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A&L alumnus and former U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly ’77 confirmed as US ambassador to the Holy See

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: Internationalism, General News, Catholicism, and Alumni

The U.S. Senate today confirmed the nomination of University of Notre Dame alumnus and former senator Joe Donnelly as ambassador to the Holy See. A 1977 graduate of Notre Dame with a bachelor’s degree in political science, Donnelly went on to earn his law degree from the University four years later. He represented Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District, which includes Notre Dame, for three terms and served one term in the U.S. Senate.

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Video: What is the Spanish major like at Notre Dame?

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, and General News

Spanish majors pursue their passions while developing skills such as language proficiency, intercultural competence, critical thinking, and analysis. “By the end, I feel 100 times more competent in Spanish than when I came into college," said Spanish major Natalie Reysa. "The Spanish program really enhanced and enriched my experience at Notre Dame, and I would have never had it any other way."

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NEH awards three fellowships and a digital scholarship grant to Arts & Letters faculty, continuing Notre Dame’s record success

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Three faculty members in the College of Arts & Letters — philosopher Sara Bernstein, theatre scholar Tarryn Chun, and historian Katie Jarvis — have won National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, extending Notre Dame's record success with the federal agency committed to supporting original research and scholarship. The University also received a significant grant for a digital scholarship project that will develop a new platform that makes digital archives easier to analyze, present, and reuse. Since 2000, Arts & Letters faculty have received more NEH fellowships than any other private university in the country.

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New Globally Engaged Citizens program allows Notre Dame students to demonstrate their intercultural competence and language skills

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures at Notre Dame has launched the Globally Engaged Citizens program, designed to reward students for their engagement with language and culture studies and encourage participation by students who are not required to take language classes. Through a combination of coursework and cultural experiences, the program offers Notre Dame students from all colleges and schools the opportunity to demonstrate that they have spent time during their college experience preparing to be a global citizen.

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Through research and service, history and neuroscience major examines the past and prepares for a future focused on helping communities build resilience

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, and General News

The image of Black inmates working in fields where enslaved African Americans once toiled has been seared into Notre Dame senior Aysha Gibson’s mind since she went on a high school field trip to the Louisiana State Penitentiary. Gibson, a history and neuroscience and behavior major, is now writing her senior thesis about the prison to provide a deeper understanding of America’s penal system. The independent research project, advised by associate professor Rebecca McKenna, considers race, morality, state law, labor, and geography — and is the culmination of an undergraduate career full of academic and service experiences that helped her consider how to support communities experiencing hardship. 

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Video: What is the Russian major like at Notre Dame?

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, and General News

Russian majors pursue their passions while developing skills such as language proficiency, cultural empathy, communication, and analysis. "Being in the classroom, getting to interact with friends and colleagues in Russian, making jokes in Russian, is something I really enjoy," said Russian major Patrick Brady. "The professors do a great job of making the classes really fun and engaging."

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Notre Dame’s Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy creates The 1-6-25 Project, sounding alarm about impending threats to U.S. electoral system

Author: The Rooney Center

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

The Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy is launching The January 6th, 2025, Project — a research, teaching, and public engagement initiative devoted to understanding and averting looming threats to U.S. democracy. Through in-depth study and analysis of the social, political, psychological, and demographic factors that led to the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, the project’s members hope to offer insight into how to protect and strengthen the American electoral system before a likely attack on Jan. 6, 2025, the day the results of the 2024 presidential election will be certified by Congress.

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Six projects led by A&L faculty receive Notre Dame Research internal grants

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Six projects led by faculty in the College of Arts & Letters at Notre Dame, along with their collaborators at partner universities, have been awarded funding through Notre Dame Research’s Internal Grants Program. The program seeks to support faculty researchers and programs with the goal of advancing the University’s research enterprise, scholarly output, and creative endeavor. 

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‘The Good Life Method’: In new book, Notre Dame philosophers help readers explore what makes life meaningful

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Many associate philosophy with the study of abstract theories of logic, human nature or the universe. But for Notre Dame philosophers Meghan Sullivan and Paul Blaschko it is also a practical approach to the issues of everyday life. Philosophy, they say, offers a sustainable, holistic and battle-tested approach to setting goals and finding meaning. In their new book, The Good Life Method: Reasoning Through the Big Questions of Happiness, Faith, and Meaning, Blaschko and Sullivan examine how the tenets of philosophy can help readers chart their course and ultimately determine what it means to live a good life.

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Notre Dame receives nearly $1 million Lilly Endowment grant to help Department of Theology expand summer immersion and Spanish language programs for master’s degree students

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Faculty News, and Catholicism

The University of Notre Dame has been awarded nearly $1 million from Lilly Endowment Inc. to equip students in the Master of Divinity Program (M.Div.) and Master of Arts in Theology program to better serve in and learn from a diverse, ever-changing world. The grant will support cultural immersion programs and Spanish proficiency courses for 13 to 18 lay and seminarian students, as well as opportunities to meet with and learn from peers at other colleges.

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In memoriam: Carmen-Helena Téllez, professor of conducting

Author: College of Arts and Letters

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Carmen-Helena Téllez, a professor of conducting in the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Music, died Friday (Dec. 10) after a battle with cancer. She was 66. A member of the Notre Dame faculty since 2012, she served for several years as head of the Graduate Conducting Studio in the Sacred Music at Notre Dame program and was the first to lead its doctoral program in choral conducting. At Notre Dame, she conducted and designed a series of musical works with new modes of interdisciplinary presentation.

 

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New ISLA grant program to increase underserved students’ access to research opportunities

Author: Beth Staples

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, and General News

The College of Arts and Letters’ Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts is dismantling financial barriers to help a wider range of students take part in faculty-mentored summer research.Starting this May, ISLA’s Research Access Mentoring Program (RAMP) grant will provide awardees from the College of Arts and Letters with a stipend of $3,500, room and board, and a research allowance of up to $1,500 to take part in 10-week, on-campus projects of interest. Recipients also will receive tuition for a 3-credit summer course.

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Economics major Trevor Lwere named Notre Dame’s first Schwarzman Scholar

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, and Catholicism

Notre Dame senior Trevor Lwere will pursue a Master of Global Affairs in Beijing next year as a member of the Schwarzman Scholar Class of 2023. A native of Kampala, Uganda, he is one of 151 Schwarzman Scholars from a pool of nearly 3,000 applicants from around the globe. He is Notre Dame’s first Schwarzman Scholar since the program was established in 2016. Lwere is an economics major and philosophy, politics and economics minor, with a supplementary major in global affairs. He is a member of the Hesburgh-Yusko Scholars Program, the Glynn Family Honors Program and the Kellogg Institute International Scholars Program.

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