Latest News

Latest News » General News

Political Science Alumna Translates Service Experience to Career at Facebook

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Centers and Institutes

Kaitlin Sullivan

Before the rigors of post-college life set in—before mortgages, family, a career, and all the other responsibilities that come with setting off into the world—Kaitlin Sullivan ’10 wanted to devote at least one year of her life to service. Sullivan remembers talking with professors and fellow students at Notre Dame about how the purpose of their education wasn’t just learning for the sake of learning, but to help them to go out and do good in the world. It’s a perspective she carried into her service experience—and in her professional career as a product policy manager for Facebook.

Read More

Professor, Cushwa Center Director Begins Leadership of American Catholic Historical Association

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Kathleen Sprows-Cummings

Pope Francis has ignited increased public interest in the future of the Catholic Church, and Kathleen Sprows Cummings hopes she can use that to remind people of the Church’s past. Cummings, an associate professor of American studies and history and the William W. and Anna Jean Cushwa Director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at Notre Dame, begins her term this month as vice president/president-elect of the American Catholic Historical Association.

Read More

Photography MFA Student Commissioned for Indiana Bicentennial Project

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, and Arts

Chris Dant WPA photos icon

When University of Notre Dame graduate student Chris Dant takes a picture, he expects to come away with more than just a photograph. The third-year MFA student wants you to relate to and learn more about whatever you’re looking at. Be it an old Naval armory, or a group of skateboarders in South Bend. Dant’s ability to find those connections earned him a recent commission from the South Bend Museum of Art to document Works Progress Administration (WPA) projects across the state. His project, titled “WPA in Indiana,” was featured at the museum throughout December and January and commemorates Indiana’s bicentennial in 2016.

Read More

New Political Science Faculty Expand Department’s International Profile

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Karrie Koesel and Susanne Wengle

As students read news about China’s turbulent economy or about Russia flexing political muscle, two new professors in Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science can provide them with context about what’s happening. Associate Professor Karrie Koesel and Assistant Professor Susanne Wengle have both lived in Russia and studied its culture and politics for years. Koesel has also worked and researched in China. The two new faculty members expand the breadth of Notre Dame’s international research and scholarship in political science.

Read More

Video: History Alumnus James Moynihan ’73 on the Professional Benefits of Learning a Language

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Internationalism

James Moynihan

“English is the spoken tongue throughout the world, but it pays great dividends for you if you make a sincere effort to study and use the language,” said James Moynihan ’73. “It was most beneficial (to me) and I highly recommended it, and obviously it’s had a very, very positive effect upon my career.” Moynihan is the director of Louis Vuitton Japan’s intellectual property department, based in the company’s Tokyo offices. He formerly served as a legal attache for the FBI at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo.

Read More

Graduate School to Host Inaugural Three Minute Thesis Competition

Author: Evan Bryson

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Research

ND Dome Moon icon crop

The Graduate School will host Three Minute Thesis (3MT) this spring, a competition showcasing graduate student research. Qualifying heats begin in late February and will culminate in a Final on March 16 (Wednesday) with a first prize of $1,000. 3MT will be a venue for graduate students from various disciplines to interact with one another and discuss their research and its implications. Additionally, the competition provides an opportunity for undergraduates, alumni, industry partners, various on-campus departments and institutions, and the community to be exposed to the high-level, cutting-edge research being performed at the University of Notre Dame.

Read More

Notre Dame Launches Initiative to Develop Better Catholic Preaching

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News and Catholicism

Basilica

Notre Dame’s John S. Marten Program for Homiletics and Liturgics has embarked on a unique project specifically designed to strengthen Catholic preaching. The Rev. William A. Toohey, C.S.C., Notre Dame Preaching Academy, a five-year initiative funded by the Lilly Endowment of Indianapolis, has enrolled its first cohort of 23 priest-participants from Notre Dame’s founding religious order, the Congregation of Holy Cross, as well as from the archdioceses of Indianapolis and Louisville, Kentucky; and the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana.

Read More

Psychology Graduate Student’s Research Explores Ways to Improve Memory

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Research

Andrea Kalchik

The key to improving human memory, Notre Dame psychology graduate student Andrea Kalchik believes, is understanding the circumstances that cause us to forget. “Everyday forgetting is something that impacts everyone to some extent,” she said. “My research has the potential to help improve all people’s lives. I hope that I can make that difference.” Kalchik, a Presidential University Fellow pursuing a Ph.D. in the Department of Psychology’s Cognition, Brain, and Behavior Area, is focusing her research on brain processes—metamemory, episodic future thinking, and prospective memory—that are essential components of human brain function.

Read More

Video: Music and Japanese Major Interns at Oracle in Tokyo

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Emily Campagna

In the summer of 2015, Emily Campagna interned at Oracle Japan, handling a variety of responsibilities, including competitor analysis, mid-market analysis to help find new clients, and research to improve the company’s employee culture. Sponsored by Notre Dame’s Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, the Oracle Japan Summer Internship program supports successful applicants in a project-based internship experience at the Tokyo offices of Oracle, a world-leader in cloud computing and software services.

Read More

Graduate Student Travels to Nepal to Design and Construct Housing for Earthquake Victims

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, and Internationalism

Kevin Phaup

Kevin Phaup, who is pursuing a master’s degree in industrial design, went to Nepal last summer to conduct research for his thesis project—designing stronger, safer, cost-effective temporary shelters for refugees and victims of natural disasters. While there, he worked with Hope for Nepal, an organization co-founded by Assistant Professor Ann-Marie Conrado, to construct temporary shelters, permanent homes, and schools after an April 2015 earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people and displaced more than 3 million.

Read More

Blending Psychology and Computer Science, Professor Seeks to Build Technologies That Help Humans Learn

Author: Fred Bauters

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Sidney D'Mello

Computers are astounding devices, but they aren’t great listeners. They can’t lend a hand when users struggle to find a file, don’t understand what they are reading, or fall asleep studying for a test. But that may all change someday soon. Sidney D’Mello, an assistant professor of psychology and computer science at the University of Notre Dame, is tackling research at the intersection of cognition and emotion during complex learning and problem-solving. Through several projects he’s leading or collaborating on, D’Mello is creating real-time computational models built from extensive lab- and school-based research, with the long-term, big-picture goal of making computers more humanlike so they can guide us in learning—at work, at school, and in daily life.

Read More

Through a Sociologist’s Lens—Democracy and Development in Brazil

Author: Hendriksen, Mary

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Ann Mische

Notre Dame sociologist Ann Mische, a scholar of social movements in Brazil and around the world, has an intense interest in how citizens in a democracy debate their futures and engage in collective efforts to bring about social and political change. In her work, she investigates processes and styles of communication and decision making across civil society networks and their implications for democracy, development, and social justice.

Read More

Using New Technology, Sociologists Gain Insight Into Students' Social Development

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

social media

Cellphones, any parent can attest, play a central role in the lives of college students. Studies show that nearly all college students own a cellphone, and most of those students use text messaging as their main form of communication. Researchers from the University of Notre Dame used the centrality of cellphones in college students’ lives to delve deep into students’ usage habits and how their social networks affect their everyday lives.

Read More

Experiencing the World Fellowship Inspires Commitment to Culturally Centered Development

Author: Emily Beaudoin '17

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Emily Campbell '17

Unless you have a conversation to really understand culture, you can’t make effective change. That’s what Emily Campbell ’17 learned during her Kellogg Institute Experiencing the World fellowship last summer. Her experience in Rwanda focused her future academic work, affirmed her career goals, and motivated her to make lasting international development change.

Read More

Economics Department Adds Faculty Experts in Education, Energy, Sovereign Debt, Consumer Markets

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Notre Dame seal

Notre Dame’s Department of Economics added expertise in education, energy, sovereign debt, and consumer market behavior with the appointments this fall of four new faculty members. The fast-growing department is continually looking to add faculty who best fit with its mission and the University’s mission, said William Evans, the Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Economics and chair of the department, which often leads to new hires with varying research and teaching interests. That’s exactly the case with new assistant professors Christiane Baumeister, Chloe Gibbs, and Zachary Stangebye and assistant teaching professor Forrest Spence.

Read More

Psychologist Honored for a Lifetime of Influential Personality Research

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

David Watson

When you help create two dozen psychological assessment instruments—including one cited more than 19,000 times—the world takes notice. David Watson, the Andrew J. McKenna Family Professor of Psychology, was honored for those accomplishments and many others when the Society for Personality and Social Psychology presented him with the 2015 Jack Block Award for Distinguished Research in Personality. The award recognizes the lifetime achievements of senior-level researchers and is the organization’s top honor for research accomplishments in personality psychology.

Read More

New Democracy Dataset to ‘Revolutionize’ Democracy Research

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Michael Coppedge

A five-year collaboration between institutions in the United States and Sweden has resulted in a new, public dataset for researchers of democracy. According to Notre Dame political scientist and Kellogg Faculty Fellow Michael Coppedge, one of four principal investigators who have led the five-year effort, the data release promises to “revolutionize” quantitative research on democracy.

Read More

Shakespeare at Notre Dame Launches Yearlong Celebration of Shakespeare's Legacy

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News and Arts

Shakespeare: 1616-2016

In January, Shakespeare at Notre Dame will kick off “Shakespeare: 1616-2016,” a yearlong series of performances, conferences, and special events commemorating the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death and his legacy. “Act One” of the celebration includes events slated during the University of Notre Dame’s spring semester, which runs January through April, and features “First Folio! The Book that Gave us Shakespeare,” a national exhibition and tour curated by the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Read More

Psychologists Caution Mothers on Discussing Weight with Daughters

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, and Faculty News

How should a concerned mother discuss issues of diet and weight with her daughter? Very carefully, according to Erin Hillard, a developmental psychology doctoral student at the University of Notre Dame. In an article recently published in the journal Body Image, Hillard and her colleagues reported on results from their study of a representative group of sixth- through eighth-grade girls and their mothers.

Read More

Psychologists Find Parent Interaction Vital to Child's Well-being as Adult

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Darcia Narvaez

Did you receive affection, play freely, and feel supported in childhood? Childhood experiences like these appear to have a lot to do with well-being and moral capacities in adulthood. In a forthcoming article in the journal Applied Developmental Science, University of Notre Dame professor of psychology Darcia Narvaez and colleagues Lijuan Wang and Ying Cheng, associate professors of psychology, show that childhood experiences that match with evolved needs lead to better outcomes in adulthood.

Read More

Three Notre Dame Faculty Receive Fellowships from National Endowment for the Humanities

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

NEH

Three faculty from the University of Notre Dame received fellowships this week from the National Endowment for the Humanities, continuing the University’s record success winning support for humanities research. Receiving the grants are Julia Douthwaite, a professor of French; Amy Mulligan, an assistant professor of Irish language and literature; and Gabriel Said Reynolds, a professor of Islamic studies and theology. Since 1999, College of Arts and Letters faculty have won 57 NEH fellowships—more than any other private university in the country.

Read More

Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures Offers New Minor: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Author: Charlene Dundek

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Notre Dame seal

The Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters is launching a new minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). The program offers students the opportunity to study linguistics education, learn how to teach English, and develop classroom management and lesson planning skills.

Read More

Economics Alumna is the Catholic Church’s Consultant in Chicago

Author: Bianca Almada

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Catholicism

Betsy Bohlen

Though Betsy Bohlen ’90 once enjoyed success as a partner at Chicago’s McKinsey and Co., the business leader always knew she eventually wanted to direct her efforts toward nonprofit work, especially within the Catholic Church. “There was a part of me that always felt that, one of these days, I would serve in a more nonprofit capacity,” Bohlen said. “I think there was a calling for me to do that, to apply my leadership skills there.” Today, she is the chief operating officer of the Archdiocese of Chicago, making her the highest ranking woman in Chicago’s Catholic Church.

Read More

How Researchers Are Turning ‘Star Wars’ Droids into Reality

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

R2-D2, left, and C-3PO droids from "Star Wars"

After nearly 40 years of pop culture relevancy, the Star Wars saga is continuing this month with the December 18 release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Fans are lining up to see beloved characters return to the screen, including Han Solo and General Leia, and to welcome several new ones, including a variety of droids. The enduring popularity of and interest in C-3PO and R2-D2 speaks to the fascination many people have with robotics and artificial intelligence. Although no one will have their own C-3PO soon, a number of University of Notre Dame researchers are working to make droids more science fact than science fiction.

Read More

People in States That Rely Heavily on Ballot Initiatives Are Happier

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Benjamin Radcliff icon

Ballot initiatives, those petition-driven public votes on contested issues, are often disparaged by liberals and conservatives alike for their avoidance of conventional representative democratic processes and their vulnerability to manipulation by well-financed and organized special interest groups. Nevertheless, according to Benjamin Radcliff, professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, people in states that rely more heavily on such initiatives are, on average, happier than people in other states.

Read More

Psychologist Wins Early Career Award for Research on Sleep and Stress

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Jessica Payne

Jessica Payne never dreamed of becoming a rising star in the science of sleep. In fact, until midway through graduate school, she didn’t think much about the subject beyond her own off-and-on problems getting some shut-eye. Now, she can’t keep it off her mind. Payne’s tireless work recently earned her the "Psychonomic Society’s Early Career Award, given to individuals who have made significant contributions to scientific psychology early in their careers.

Read More

Economics Major Finds Abundant Research Opportunities at Notre Dame

Author: Tessa Bangs

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Internationalism

Melanie Wallskog

Notre Dame economics major Melanie Wallskog walked into her professor’s office hours with a question. She walked out with a job. That simple act of reaching out to a professor led to research opportunities in Nicaragua, Ireland, and Chicago. The senior from Bloomington, Indiana, and Glynn Family Honors Scholar has now co-authored a paper with two of her professors and is working on her senior thesis.

Read More

Video: Student Researches Impact of Communist Ideology in Shanghai

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Matt Souza

During the summer of 2015, Notre Dame history and political science major Matt Souza interviewed laborers in multiple Chinese cities. The goal of his research was to determine whether the official ideology of the Communist Party is still influential amongst Chinese citizens. “All of my findings, they’re actually quite different from all the previous research, and I really want to get my ideas and all my findings out to the public,” he said. Souza’s research was supported by the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program in the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts.

Read More