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MFA design student’s board game gets first-year students talking about tough topics

Author: Teagan Dillon

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Graduate Students, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Throughout the month of March, students in the Moreau First Year Experience course have been visiting the McDonald Center for Student Well-Being to try out a new board game created by Carly Hagins, an MFA student focusing on industrial design. “Quad: A Game of Conversations” works to spark discussion between players about social life at Notre Dame, in the hopes of breaking down the initial misperceptions that often lead to unhealthy drinking habits.

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Professor uses cutting-edge technology to conduct ‘engaged anthropology’ at prehistoric Illinois site 

Author: Jack Rooney

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Mark Schurr, professor and acting chair of Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology, is dedicated to research that doesn’t just serve academic ends, but can also do good for the world. At his latest research site — the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie near Joliet, Illinois — he is exploring what life was like for 17th-century Native Americans and working to determine how to best restore the area to a natural environment that allows visitors to enjoy and learn from the land. 
 

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A global education prepares Arabic major for career in U.S. Department of Justice

Author: Eileen Lynch

Categories: Internationalism, General News, and Alumni

For Victoria Braga ’11, a semester in Egypt as an undergraduate gave her a new perspective on the United States — and shaped her future career path. Braga came to Notre Dame with an interest in international relations, but her study abroad experience inspired her to pursue a career as an attorney and a position in the U.S. government. Today, the Arabic and political science major works as a trial attorney in the appellate section of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Immigration Litigation.

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Notre Dame psychologist helps develop new violence risk assessment tool featured in Journal of Crime and Justice

Author: Luis Ruuska

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

The article, “Identifying high-risk young adults for violence prevention: a validation of psychometric and social scales in Honduras,” details the creation of the new Violence-Involved Persons Risk Assessment tool, an aggregate of seven psychometric and social risk assessment tools previously validated in various American and European contexts.

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Sociologist studies progressive role of religious activism in immigration and Women’s March

Author: Katie Boruff

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

There are two sides to every story. And for Kraig Beyerlein, there's a side of the story about religious activism that has not been fully told. The associate professor of sociology studies protest movements and has been examining the role of progressive religious activism in the Women's March and along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Alumni discuss how the international economics major prepared them for jobs in consulting, finance, and research

Author: Teagan Dillon

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Alumni

Four alumni of Notre Dame’s international economics program returned to campus in March to speak to current students about their experience with the major, valuable classes they took, and the skills they developed that are now paying dividends in the real world

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Why sociology, research, and travel have expanded an Arts and Letters pre-health major’s approach to medicine

Author: Teagan Dillon

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, and Centers and Institutes

When King Fok was 6 years old, he suffered from an orthopedic condition that caused him to spend two years on crutches. Uncovered by his health insurance, the condition was Fok’s first glimpse into how socioeconomic status impacts health care. That childhood experience informed his decision to major in Arts and Letters pre-health at the University of Notre Dame. As a future physician, he hopes to make medical care more efficient, inclusive, and accessible to all. A sociology class his freshman year helped him discover a perfect major to pair with pre-health.

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Two Arts and Letters graduate students named Humanities Without Walls fellows

Author: Nora Kenney

Categories: Research, Graduate Students, and General News

Caitlin Smith-Oyekole, a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in English, and Sevda Arslan, a second-year Ph.D. student in anthropology, have been named 2018 Humanities Without Walls (HWW) pre-doctoral workshop fellows. Supported by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, HWW is a consortium of 15 Midwestern humanities institutes fostering cross-institutional collaboration in humanities-based research, teaching, and scholarship. 

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Physician relies on anthropology background when treating patients in trauma center

Author: Jack Rooney

Categories: General News and Alumni

As an orthopedic resident at Loyola University Medical Center, Daniel Schmitt ’11 sees a wide variety of patients. Schmitt, who majored in anthropology and biology, relies on his liberal arts education to connect with his diverse patient base and treat them comprehensively at the Level I trauma center — a hospital providing the highest level of surgery to trauma victims.

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College of Arts and Letters announces new minor in data science

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Faculty News

The College of Arts and Letters is launching a new, interdisciplinary minor in data science. Housed in the Department of Sociology with support from the College of Engineering’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering, the program will be open to students in any college. “Data science impacts every industry today,” said Sarah Mustillo, professor and chair of sociology. “It is becoming increasingly important for solving problems and making decisions."

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American studies professor named to Norman Rockwell Center’s new Society of Fellows

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Arts

Erika Doss, a Notre Dame professor of American studies, has been named to the first-ever Society of Fellows for the Norman Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies. Established to bring leading thinkers to the study of nearly 200 years of American illustration art, the group hopes to more fully develop the language and discourse of an academic discipline devoted to published art.

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Prominent women in political office boost female candidates down ballot, new research finds

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

The presence of a prominent female officeholder has a positive effect on the number of women running for lower offices in her state, according to new research by University of Notre Dame political scientist Jeffrey J. Harden. A state with a female governor or U.S. senator will see an increase in the proportion of women seeking state legislative office by about 2 to 3 percentage points, Harden and two co-authors wrote in an article published this month in the American Journal of Political Science.

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Design research students help South Bend visualize proposed technology center

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Undergraduate News, Graduate Students, General News, Faculty News, and Arts

When the city of South Bend needed ideas for a new community technology center, it turned to Ann-Marie Conrado’s design research practices class at the University of Notre Dame for help. Part of the collaborative innovation minor in the Department of Art, Art History and Design, the class brings together students from multiple disciplines, from design and engineering to business and anthropology, to solve complex design problems. In this case, the city wanted to create what it called an “inclusive technology resource center” to help residents on the wrong side of the digital divide take advantage of technology for personal and professional growth.

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First Time Fans film series returns for Season 4, featuring work from students and alumni

Author: Ted Mandell

Categories: Undergraduate News, General News, and Alumni

A truly unique production model, First Time Fans brings together Notre Dame alumni filmmakers and pairs them with current students to tell inspiring stories about extraordinary people on an extraordinary campus. A joint venture of the College of Arts and Letters, the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre, and the Athletics Department, First Time Fans is a filmmaking co-op where alumni are given the creative canvas to tell a Notre Dame story through the eyes of someone new to campus, using the backdrop of a Fighting Irish athletic event.

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Notre Dame senior Brittany Ebeling named Michel David-Weill Laureate

An international economics major with a concentration in French and a supplementary major in peace studies, Brittany Ebeling has been named the 2018 Michel David-Weill Laureate, allowing her to pursue a fully funded two-year master’s degree program at the prestigious Paris Institute of Political Studies, or “Sciences Po.” The scholarship is awarded each year to one American who exemplifies the core values of Sciences Po alumnus Michel David-Weill, namely, academic excellence, leadership, multiculturalism, tolerance, and high achievement.

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Irish language and literature professor wins ACLS fellowship for research on bardic poetry

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Sarah McKibben, an associate professor of Irish language and literature, has won a prestigious fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies for her book project, “Tradition Transformed: Bardic Poetry and Patronage in Early Modern Ireland, c. 1560-1660.” McKibben, who is also a faculty fellow in the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, focuses her scholarship on bardic poetry in Ireland during the 16th and 17th centuries. 

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Sarah Mustillo appointed I.A. O'Shaughnessy Dean of College of Arts and Letters

Author: Patrick Gibbons

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Sarah A. Mustillo, department chair and professor of sociology at the University of Notre Dame, has been appointed I.A. O’Shaughnessy Dean of the College of Arts and Letters by University President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. She succeeds John T. McGreevy, who is stepping down July 1 after serving 10 years as dean. An expert in the social causes of childhood mental illness and statistical methods used in social science research, Mustillo joined the Notre Dame faculty in 2014, after serving seven years as a professor of sociology at Purdue University and six years on the faculty at Duke University School of Medicine. She has served as chair of the Department of Sociology since 2016.

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College of Arts and Letters to expand café in O’Shaughnessy Hall

Author: College of Arts and Letters

Categories: General News

The College of Arts and Letters is planning renovations in O’Shaughnessy Hall that will open up the café and gallery areas to create a welcoming space with double the current seating of Waddick’s, more natural light, and extensive views onto South Quad. New tables and counter seating will be added, along with couches and comfortable chairs, and multiple outlets for charging phones, computers, and other electronic devices. Unlike at present, the entire space will be open whenever the building is open, morning till night.

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Notre Dame psychologists hope to make virtual reality the next frontier in treating phobias

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

For a team of Notre Dame psychologists, virtual reality is more than a game — it is the next frontier in mental health treatment. Nathan Rose, Jennifer Hames, and Michael Villano are conducting research on the use of virtual reality environments in exposure therapy for participants with a fear of heights. The technology also holds promise for treating phobias like the fear of flying and post-traumatic stress disorder.

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In memoriam: Mary Ellen Konieczny, Henkels Family Associate Professor of Sociology

Author: Kate Garry

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Catholicism

Mary Ellen Konieczny, the Henkels Family Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, died Feb. 24 as a result of complications from cancer. She was 58. A faculty fellow of the Center for the Study of Religion and Society and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, she studied religion and conflict, the family and public politics.

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Study points to fertility as a leading economic indicator

Author: Shannon Roddel

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

New research from the University of Notre Dame discovers people appear to stop conceiving babies several months before recessions begin. The study, “Is Fertility a Leading Economic Indicator?” was published in the National Bureau of Economic Research’s working paper series. It is coauthored by Notre Dame economists Kasey Buckles and Daniel Hungerman, and Steven Lugauer from the University of Kentucky.

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Video: Rev. Daniel G. Groody, C.S.C., on studying international migration and refugees as a theological issue

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Rev. Daniel G. Groody, C.S.C. is associate professor of theology and global affairs and the director of the Kellogg Global Leadership Program. His research interests include migration and the US-Mexican border, international migration, and refugees.

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Notre Dame among top producers of Fulbright students for fourth straight year

Twenty-nine University of Notre Dame students and alumni were awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants during the 2017-18 academic year, placing Notre Dame second among all research institutions in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Of the 29 students to receive Fulbrights last year, 22 were Arts and Letters students — which would place the College eighth in the nation among all doctoral institutions. Arts and Letters alone produced more Fulbright winners than the University of California at Berkeley, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, Cornell University, and Johns Hopkins.

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