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Economists find that most productive workforce may require indefinite affirmative action

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Assistant Professor of Economics Michèle Müller-Itten and her co-author, Aniko Öry from Yale University, created a model to investigate what workforce compositions would naturally emerge in a labor market and which would maximize total productivity. Their results show it is often best for optimal efficiency if the minority group is overrepresented in the workforce relative to the majority — a conclusion that flies in the face of the conventional wisdom that affirmative action will eventually be obsolete.

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Most comprehensive study yet of Latinx U.S. immigration agents shows economic self-interest drives decisions to join ICE

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, and Faculty News

Research by David Cortez, assistant professor of political science, found that Latinxs — regardless of their preferred national/ethnic identity, their identification with the immigrant experience or their attitude toward immigrants — choose to work in immigration for their own economic interest.

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With Mellon Foundation fellowship, historian to study global economic and cultural impact of coffee

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Paul Ocobock, a Notre Dame associate professor of history, has received a fellowship from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to study the complex economic and cultural connections between coffee lovers and the men, women, and children who grow the beans in places like Kenya. The New Directions Fellowship will support Ocobock’s research of key forces in the history of international trade for his book Imperial Blend: Kenyan Coffee and Capitalism in the Era of Anglo-American Empire, and to develop new courses on global economic history.

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How a PLS alumna puts her liberal arts background to work, landing jobs at Google and Pinterest

Author: Jack Rooney

Categories: General News and Alumni

Carrie Sweeney ’03 has spent much of her career learning on the job in fast-paced, high-tech environments. As she has risen through the ranks of companies like Google and Pinterest, Sweeney has drawn on the strong foundation she built as a Program of Liberal Studies major at Notre Dame. “Spending those four precious years on campus doing something that you can’t do any other time — shaping your worldview, your ethos by engaging with great texts — that’s just irreplaceable,” Sweeney said. “You can go learn about balance sheets afterward, whether that’s on the job or by getting an MBA. But there’s never going to be a time in life when you can really grapple with foundational ideas as effectively as you can while you’re at Notre Dame.” 

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Italian studies director invited to join Vatican's Dante centenary committee

Author: David Lummus

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Theodore J. Cachey Jr., a professor of Italian and the Albert J. and Helen M. Ravarino Family Director of Dante and Italian Studies, has been invited to sit on the scientific committee for the 2021 Dante centenary, organized by the Pontifical Council for Culture. He is the sole representative of Dante studies outside of Italy to participate in the deliberations of the planning committee.

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de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture to host panel discussion about racism and the culture of life

Author: Kenneth Hallenius

Categories: General News and Centers and Institutes

Inspired by Pope Francis's observation that Christians "cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion in any form and yet claim to defend the sacredness of every human life," the de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture will host a webinar discussion on racism and the culture of life on July 28 at 8:00 p.m. (EDT).

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Self-regulation prime reason for slowed mobility during coronavirus lockdown, economists find

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

To get a clearer picture of people’s mobility in the U.S. during the lockdown period, William Evans and Christopher Cronin, economics researchers at Notre Dame, gathered and analyzed all U.S. coronavirus-related state and local orders and compared them with geolocation data collected across 40 million cellular devices that have opted-in to location sharing services.

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Program of Liberal Studies professor wins fellowship to research at center for Italian Renaissance studies in Florence

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Denis Robichaud, an associate professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, has been awarded the I Tatti Jean-François Malle Residential Fellowship for his project, Controversies over God and Being in the Italian Renaissance: religion, philosophy, and Giovanni Pico della Mirandola’s De ente et uno. As one of 15 recipients awarded an I Tatti residential fellowship, Robichaud will spend a year researching and writing at I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy.

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Anthropologist named a Mellon Emerging Faculty Leader by Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Notre Dame anthropologist Alex Chávez has been named one of 10 Mellon Emerging Faculty Leaders at the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. The award supports junior faculty whose research focuses on contemporary American history, politics, culture, and society, and who are committed to the creation of an inclusive campus community for underrepresented students and scholars. 

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The Inspiration Place: Writers and artists find space to create at Ireland's Kylemore Abbey

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, Graduate Students, General News, and Arts

At Kylemore Abbey in western Ireland, the presence of pure beauty overwhelms. A mere picture will not suffice; you must draw or write or paint. That’s the idea behind two summer programs that Notre Dame runs at the abbey in the Connemara mountains. The debut of a month-long graduate art residency last summer adds another option on top of a three-credit creative writing seminar that began in 2016. The 19 students spent the first week at the Dublin Global Gateway soaking in the city arts and lit scene, then spent the remainder at Kylemore Abbey, a 19th-century castle where Notre Dame has renovated a section for hosting guests.

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Eye of the hurricane: Notre Dame's new provost understands crisis leadership

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Marie Lynn Miranda, announced as the successor to Thomas Burish in mid-March, is no stranger to leading a university through a crisis. Now the Charles and Jill Fischer Provost at Notre Dame, the former provost of Rice University and a distinguished scholar in the field of children’s environmental health organized the school's disaster response in the wake of Hurricane Harvey in 2017. “Throughout our lives, we are confronted with situations where we don’t quite know what to do,” she said. “We don’t know what the best thing is and we don’t necessarily have all the expertise we might ideally have. We must bring data and analysis and the best technical advice there is. But when in doubt, responding with love is always a good choice.”

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Notre Dame, IBM launch Tech Ethics Lab to tackle the ethical implications of technology

Author: Patrick Gibbons

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

The University of Notre Dame in partnership with IBM today launched a collaboration that will address the myriad ethical concerns raised by the use of advanced technologies, including artificial intelligence, machine learning and quantum computing, to address society’s most pressing problems. Funded by a 10-year, $20 million IBM commitment, the new Notre Dame-IBM Tech Ethics Lab will conduct applied research and promote models for the ethical application of technology within the tech sector, business and government.
 

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Law professor Mark McKenna named founding director of Notre Dame’s Technology Ethics Center

Author: Brandi Wampler

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Mark McKenna, the John P. Murphy Foundation Professor of Law and director of the Law School’s Program on Intellectual Property and Technology Law, has been named the founding director of the University of Notre Dame’s Technology Ethics Center. ND-TEC was formed as a result of interest and leadership from Sarah Mustillo, dean of the College of Arts and Letters, and Provost Thomas G. Burish.

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Kylemore Abbey Global Centre, campus partners announce new program on literary works and films during pandemics

The Kylemore Abbey Global Centre, along with six partners from across the University of Notre Dame campus, has launched the Kylemore Book Club, an open, multimedia, educational enrichment program featuring Notre Dame’s expert faculty. The debut program, “Literature and Film in Lockdown,” is led by Professor of English and the Donald R. Keough Family Professor of Irish Studies Barry McCrea

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History alumna follows her curiosity and ‘growth mindset’ to a career in publishing, artificial intelligence, and podcasts

Author: Jack Rooney

Categories: Undergraduate News, Internationalism, General News, and Alumni

Michelle Gaseor ’11 doesn’t meet many other history majors in the tech world. But in her career, which has taken her from educational publishing and user experience design to the forefront of conversational artificial intelligence, she continually builds upon the foundation she established in the College of Arts and Letters. 

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Twenty Arts and Letters students and alumni awarded Fulbright grants

Twenty-six University of Notre Dame students and alumni — including 20 from the College of Arts and Letters — have been awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants to teach or study abroad during the 2020-21 academic year. Notre Dame has been a top producer of Fulbright students for six consecutive years.

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At a Chicago museum and a South Bend kindergarten, anthropology and Spanish major discovers a future in research and education 

Author: Ashley Lo

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, and General News

Firing a portable X-ray fluorescence scanner at 2,000-year-old artifacts last summer, Claire Stanecki discovered the value of hands-on education. A 2020 graduate who majored in anthropology and Spanish, Stanecki’s Arts and Letters education has been defined by exploring nontraditional forms of learning — from conducting research at a museum to studying the benefits of bilingual education in a local school. “The ability to learn about something and actually go interact with it is so incredibly mind-blowing,” she said.

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International economics major combats poverty through researching and implementing microfinance services

At Notre Dame, senior Emily Pohl found a passion for social change — and put it into action. An international economics major with a concentration in French, Pohl worked to combat the cycle of poverty by researching and implementing microfinance initiatives. She is graduating with a portfolio of real-world research experiences, a published journal article, and a position at LEK Consulting in Chicago. And it was her Arts and Letters education that empowered her to take action.

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How the Program of Liberal Studies helped McKenna Cassidy expand her mind, strengthen her faith, and find a career path she loves 

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, and General News

The Program of Liberal Studies’ motto — Learn what it means to be human — is a phrase that Notre Dame senior McKenna Cassidy has taken to heart. She grappled with big ideas in her Arts and Letters courses, traveled to Italy to research Renaissance mealtime rituals, and followed her passions to a career in the wine industry. “That motto is a wonderful goal for each individual,” Cassidy said. “It is important to understand who I am and why I’m here, and I’m grateful for the space that the College of Arts and Letters has created for me to discern that question.”

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Notre Dame anthropologist elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Agustín Fuentes, the Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C. Chair in Anthropology, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s oldest learned societies and independent policy research centers. He is among more than 250 members of the 240th AAAS class, which includes singer-songwriter Joan Baez, former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, and filmmaker Richard Linklater.

 

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Seniors team up for Hesburgh Program capstone project, researching bipartisan solutions to reducing recidivism

Author: Sophia Lauber

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, General News, and Centers and Institutes

Seniors Kendrick Peterson and Andrew Jarocki are on opposite ends of the political spectrum, but they brought their perspectives together for research they hope will make an impact on the South Bend community. The pair chose to team up for their Hesburgh Program in Public Service capstone project — searching for a solution to reducing recidivism that Democrats and Republicans can agree on.

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Through research and teaching, Notre Dame historian and gender studies scholar-in-residence explores how archives shape narratives

What Karen Graubart didn’t find in archives in Spain and Peru was, in some ways, as valuable as what she did. An associate professor in the Department of History, Graubart has spent more than 15 years conducting archival research on women and non-dominant communities in the Iberian Empire for her first two books. But she is also considering how the archives themselves have shaped her research — by questioning who is represented in them and why.

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Theology major Brady Stiller named valedictorian; Glynn Scholar Love Osunnuga selected salutatorian

Author: Sue Ryan

Categories: Undergraduate News and General News

Brady Stiller of Madisonville, Louisiana, has been named valedictorian and Love Osunnuga from Granger, Indiana, was selected as salutatorian of the 2020 University of Notre Dame graduating class. Stiller is a biological sciences and theology major and guided small groups of first-year students in weekly philosophical discussions as a dialogue facilitator in the God and the Good Life Fellows Program directed by Meghan Sullivan, the Rev. John A. O’Brien Collegiate Chair and Professor of Philosophy. Osunnuga is a biological sciences and honors mathematics major and a member of the Glynn Family Honors Program.

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A&L alumna Nikole Hannah-Jones wins Pulitzer Prize

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News and Alumni

Nikole Hannah-Jones, a 1998 University of Notre Dame alumna and an investigative reporter for The New York Times Magazine, has won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for criticism, journalism’s highest honor. Hannah-Jones was recognized for her introductory essay to the newspaper’s landmark The 1619 Project, an ongoing and interactive series she created that focuses on the 400th anniversary of when enslaved Africans were first brought to what would become the United States.

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In memoriam: Gilburt Loescher, emeritus professor of political science

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Gilburt Loescher, a longtime Notre Dame political scientist and an international expert on refugee and humanitarian issues, died April 28 of heart failure. He was 75. In 2003, he was in Baghdad, Iraq, when a suicide bomber attacked United Nations offices at the Canal Hotel. Loescher was among the more than 150 people injured in the attack, his wounds life-threatening, with doctors giving him only a 25 percent chance of survival. It took rescuers more than four hours to extract him from the rubble, amputating his legs in the process.

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How palm oil explains state-building in Colombia: A Q&A with political science Ph.D. candidate Camilo Neito-Matiz

What does palm oil — cheap, easy to produce, and endlessly versatile — explain about state-building in a region wracked by violence? Plenty, according to Ph.D. candidate Camilo Nieto-Matiz, a comparative political scientist who studies how states increase their capacity in subnational peripheries, poor areas with little state presence, in times of conflict. In other words, he examines how governments undertake fundamental tasks like providing security, collecting taxes, and building schools and roads ­— all of which are necessary for development, democracy, and political order.

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Video: Government major Chris Wilson '85 on his career in finance

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News and Alumni

“I think being a lifelong learner is important, both in a career and in life,” said Chris Wilson ’85, senior partner at Stonehill Capital Management in New York. Wilson started at Notre Dame as an engineering major, but realized early on that it wasn’t a good fit for him. “I thought, ‘Somebody really needs to know the forces acting on that bridge and somebody really needs to know that really well, but it doesn't have to be me,” he said. Fortunately, he loved the elective courses he had been taking in government, so he switched majors. 

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American studies professor’s research on slaves’ courtroom testimony garners multiple book awards

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Sophie White, a professor in the Department of American Studies, offered an exceptional glimpse into the lives of the enslaved — through their own words — in her latest book, Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Louisiana. She recently won two awards for the work — the Kemper and Leila Williams Book Prize and the 2020 Summerlee Book Prize. White also received an honorable mention for the Merle Curti Award for best book in American social history from the Organization of American Historians.

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