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Heather Reynolds named inaugural managing director of Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities

Author: DJ DiDonna

Categories: General News and Centers and Institutes

Heather Reynolds, a nonprofit leader with extensive expertise in poverty alleviation, will join the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities at Notre Dame as its inaugural managing director in January. Reynolds has served as president and CEO at Catholic Charities Fort Worth for the past 14 years.

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Psychology professor to improve assessment testing for high school students

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Ying Alison Cheng, associate professor of psychology and fellow of the Institute for Educational Initiatives at the University of Notre Dame, will lead a $1.4 million project funded by the Institute of Education Sciences to develop the intelligent diagnostic assessment program (i-DAP) for high school statistics education. 

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Snite Museum of Art appoints new director

Author: Gina Costa

Categories: General News and Arts

Joseph Antenucci Becherer, the founding director and curator of the sculpture program at Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Michigan, has been appointed the new director of the Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame. He will lead a staff of 16 responsible for exhibition development and educational programs that serve Notre Dame students and faculty as well as thousands of primary and secondary school students. He also will play a major role in helping design the University’s new Raclin Murphy Museum of Art at Notre Dame, scheduled to open in 2021.

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Historian Brad Gregory wins Expanded Reason Awards honorable mention

Author: Kristian Olsen

Categories: Research, Internationalism, General News, Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, and Catholicism

Brad Gregory, director of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study and Dorothy G. Griffin Professor of Early Modern European History, received a 2018 Expanded Reason Awards honorable mention for his book, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society.

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Video: Africana studies and English professor Mark Sanders on print culture in the Americas among the African diaspora

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

“African-American cultural experience is one that can't be bound by national boundaries,” said Mark A. Sanders, a professor of English and Africana studies at the University of Notre Dame. Sanders researches early 20th-century American and African American literature and culture. He has worked extensively on the Harlem Renaissance, writing one book and co-editing another on the poet Sterling Brown. He is now working to bring together scholars to translate work by African-descended writers from across the Americas.

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English professor Laura Dassow Walls wins 2018 Phi Beta Kappa Book Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Laura Dassow Walls, the William P. and Hazel B. White Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, has won the 2018 Christian Gauss Award from Phi Beta Kappa for her biography, Henry David Thoreau: A Life. The prize, which recognizes outstanding books of literary scholarship, will be presented at a reception in Washington, D.C., in December.

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Anthropologist and psychologist's study shows fathers’ postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

In a first-of-its-kind study, Notre Dame anthropologist Lee Gettler and psychologist Patty Kuo focused on how dads’ biology around the birth of their children relates to their parenting down the road. Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth – either skin to skin or clothed – were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives.

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Through her lens: Art alumna captures untold story in Kylemore

Author: Colleen Wilcox

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, General News, Catholicism, and Alumni

It was a New Year’s Eve celebration that Mary McGraw '17 will never forget. McGraw was ringing in the new year with eight Benedictine nuns at Kylemore Abbey in Galway, Ireland. This intimate moment isn’t something that most study abroad students get to experience while in Ireland. In fact, most people will never know what it’s like to see these nuns behind closed doors. It took several months in Kylemore for McGraw to develop trust with the nuns and, ultimately, a relationship that allowed her to gain a unique perspective into their everyday lives. A studio art major with a photography concentration, McGraw was able to pull back the curtains and capture even more intimate moments through her camera lens — a project that led to her senior thesis.

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Video: English professor Kate Marshall on the 'poetics of the outside' in contemporary novels

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Kate Marshall is associate professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. Her research interests include media theory, narrative, and the philosophy of science. "I spend a lot of time working on problems in contemporary fiction and how they relate not only to the long history of the novel and other forms of literary representation but also the way that they relate to other ways of thinking in the contemporary world," she says."

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Psychologist Kristin Valentino awarded $2.7 million grant to evaluate interventions to improve mental and physical health in maltreated children

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Kristin Valentino is dedicated to understanding how adversity in early childhood — such as chronic poverty or maltreatment — can affect children’s mental and physical health later in life. And she wants to know how psychologists can best intervene and improve outcomes for those children. The William J. Shaw Center for Children and Families Associate Professor of Psychology has been awarded a $2.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue exploring these issues in her latest project, “Pathways Linking Early Adversity and Support to Behavior and Physical Health.”

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Video: Notre Dame international security expert Joseph Parent on what happens when great powers decline

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Joseph Parent, an associate professor of political science and associate director of the Notre Dame International Security Center, recently studied how states respond to shifts in power, questioning the conventional wisdom that great powers become more aggressive when they are falling. “In fact, decline is one of the biggest causes of peace,” he said. “It turns out that states were very aware of their declining power and they knew that if they started something, it would end badly for them.”

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For history major Micah Johnston, a year of service was a ‘master class’ in relationship building 

Author: Emily McConville

Categories: General News, Catholicism, and Alumni

Now a senior program office for IREX in Washington, D.C., Micah Johnston '06 spent his first year after graduation volunteering for the Little Brothers Friends of the Elderly in Chicago. He spent his days visiting the homes of elderly individuals who did not regularly see friends or family. “Spending a year in service helps other people, but it can also be a master class in learning about the world, learning about other people, incorporating that into the education you get at Notre Dame,” he said.

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Grammy-winning jazz musician Arturo Sandoval records Christmas album with Notre Dame Children's Choir

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News and Arts

An internationally acclaimed jazz and classical musician and composer, Arturo Sandoval has received 10 Grammy Awards, six Billboard Awards and an Emmy Award and is a 2013 recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, this nation’s highest civilian honor. Sandoval will headline a festive Christmas in September event featuring the Notre Dame Children's Choir, Notre Dame Symphonic Winds, and the Notre Dame Jazz Ensemble. His album Arturo Sandoval's Christmas at Notre Dame, recorded last year in the Leighton Concert Hall, will be released Sept. 28.

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Q&A with Leslie Lockett, alumna of the Ph.D. program at the Medieval Institute

Author: Brandon Cook and Karrie Fuller

Categories: Q and A, Graduate Students, General News, Centers and Institutes, and Alumni

In this Q&A, Leslie Lockett, an associate professor of English and director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at The Ohio State University, discusses early medieval concepts of the mind, what initially hooked her on the Middle Ages, and her advice for graduate students who would like to follow her career track.

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Study confirms adopting truth commissions and justice measures in post-authoritarian regimes lowers homicide rates

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

According to new research led by Notre Dame Associate Professor Guillermo Trejo, nations that adopt transitional justice measures, such as truth commissions and judicial prosecutions for past human rights violations, experience lower homicide rates and lower levels of criminal violence.

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Ernesto Verdeja, associate professor of political science and peace studies, to receive 2018 Sheedy Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Ernesto Verdeja, an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, will receive the 2018 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award. The highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters, the Sheedy Award was created in 1970 to honor the Rev. Charles E. Sheedy, C.S.C., who served as dean of Arts and Letters from 1951 to 1969. Verdeja will receive the award at a reception in his honor in May 2019.

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Master of Theological Studies program adds new World Religions World Church focus

Author: Margaret McVeigh

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Catholicism

The Department of Theology has launched a new area of concentration within its Master of Theological Studies program — World Religions World Church.  Applications for the two-year, full-time program will be due on January 15, 2019, for admission in August 2019. The area of WRWC offers students the opportunity to study both global religions and the global Church while also receiving exposure to other areas of Christian theology. In their WRWC coursework, students will have the freedom to focus on a particular non-Christian tradition or cultural context of the Church and to develop their abilities in primary and research languages.

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Arts and Letters students play integral role in new on-campus location of St. Joseph County Cyber Crimes unit

Author: Sue Ryan

Categories: Undergraduate News and General News

The unit recently relocated to Hammes Mowbray Hall, home of the Notre Dame Security Police department, to provide the county with expanded working space and greater access to a larger group of student interns. The Notre Dame students chosen this year are studying in a variety disciplines including economics, political science, and film, television and theater, as well as computer science and information technology management. Four of the students also have a minor in the Arts and Letters interdisciplinary Idzik Computing and Digital Technologies Program.

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Notre Dame psychologist guides Templeton grant project on civic virtues

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Notre Dame psychologist Darcia Narvaez is helping lead a $3.9 million Templeton Religion Trust grant that will support new research on civic virtues. The “Self, Virtue and Public Life Project,” which began this week and runs through 2021, will fund research projects, conferences, edited volumes, and community outreach activities. Narvaez will be working with Nancy Snow — director of the University of Oklahoma’s Institute for the Study Human Flourishing, where the project will be based — to steer the grant and guide its educational interventions.

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Video: English professor Ernest Morrell on why powerful, equitable literacy is essential

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Ernest Morrell's research examines how children can move beyond basic reading and writing abilities by analyzing and producing media in ways that allow them to engage meaningfully with the world. “The practices around literacy in your own neighborhood and community are just as powerful as the literacy practices in school, and hopefully we begin to bridge that gap,” he said.

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Scholar studying the sociology of education joins Arts and Letters faculty

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

Calvin Zimmermann wants to better understand the fundamental roles that race, gender, and class play in society, and particularly how they affect young children. He focuses his research on African American youth, he said, because they are one of the most vulnerable and oppressed populations in the world. Zimmermann joins the faculty of Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology and the Center for Research on Educational Opportunity this fall, where he will continue to research inequality in school settings.

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Madrasa Discourses hosts second summer intensive in Nepal

For the second summer in a row, students and faculty from Notre Dame's College of Arts and Letters converged with madrasa (Islamic seminary) graduates from India and Pakistan for two weeks of intensive teaching and dialogue in Dhulikhel, Nepal (an hour outside of Kathmandu). Drawn by Notre Dame’s Madrasa Discourses project, the July 1-14 summer intensive featured conversations about citizenship, religion, and society in a pluralistic and rapidly changing world.

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College of Arts and Letters launches new minor in musical theatre

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Undergraduate News, General News, Faculty News, and Arts

Notre Dame has launched an interdisciplinary minor in musical theatre — a collaboration between the Departments of Music and Film, Television, and Theatre — which can be customized for students interested in performing, songwriting, directing, conducting, or scholarship. The program begins at a time when dramatic, music-based performances are thriving on campus, including Opera Notre Dame’s recent productions of Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte and a world-premiere operatic version of As You Like It as well as FTT musicals such as Cabaret and Little Shop of Horrors.

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Notre Dame sociologists extend their term as editors of ASA flagship journal

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

The American Sociological Association (ASA) has announced that sociologists from the University of Notre Dame will continue to serve as editors of its flagship journal, the American Sociological Review, through 2020. Founded in 1936 and published six times per year, ASR’s mission is to publish peer-reviewed works of exceptional quality and general interest to the discipline.

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Video: Gallivan director and former New York Times reporter Richard Jones on the future of journalism

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Research, General News, and Faculty News

“The need for skilled, ethical, talented, compassionate journalists is greater now than ever before,” said Richard Jones, the Annenberg Director of the Gallivan Program in Journalism, Ethics and Democracy at Notre Dame. "It really is a natural fit to teach journalism in the context of a liberal arts education, and in the context of a Notre Dame education," he said. "There's so much overlay between the principles journalists try to adhere to and the principles that our students are taught here."

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