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New art exhibit helps students explore transnational iconography

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: Arts, Faculty News, and General News

The University of Notre Dame’s Snite Museum of Art presents Raising Children for Strangers, featuring the latest work of the Brooklyn-based, Taiwanese-American artist Fay Ku. The special exhibition is a collaboration between the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, the Liu Institute of Asia and Asian Studies, and the Snite Museum. The seven pieces featured in the exhibit are hybrid works of art that, to use the artist’s own words, “adopt visual tropes from both Western art and found images from social media to create tableaux that are open-ended narratives.”

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Notre Dame psychologist looks at the toll of daily stressors on long-term health

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

How people react to stress–both psychologically and physically–can have implications for a person’s health and well-being, including how well they age. Professor of Psychology and Associate Vice President for Research Cindy Bergeman is conducting a 10-year study based on how different people respond to stress, why they react the way they do, and the different ways people cope.

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LEO’s James Sullivan presents homelessness prevention study on Capitol Hill

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

James X. Sullivan

James Sullivan, Rev. Thomas J. McDonagh, C.S.C., Associate Professor of Economics and co-founder of the Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities at the University of Notre Dame, will participate in a briefing to Congressional members, staff and other key stakeholders on Thursday (Sept. 15) about the impact of emergency assistance on homelessness.

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In new book, Arts and Letters dean reveals Jesuits’ impact on global history

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Alumni, Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

In his new book, American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global (Princeton University Press), McGreevy uses individual religious experiences and others as a gateway to a larger narrative. The book traces how the religious order grew from 600 men in 1814 to roughly 17,000 men a century later. McGreevy argues that their odyssey of expulsion (by European nationalists worried about excessive Jesuit loyalty to the papacy) and reconstruction (as Jesuits launched a counterculture centered around parishes, schools, and universities) powerfully shaped modern history.

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New FTT assistant professor brings humanistic focus to study of video games

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Matthew Payne will join Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT) as an assistant professor this fall, bringing research and teaching interests that range from the rapidly evolving field of video games and interactive entertainment to convergent media, new media literacy, media representations of war, and ethnographic audience research. His book, Playing War: Military Video Games After 9/11, examines how games like the Call of Duty and Battlefield series “transform international strife into interactive fun."

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Video: Joshua Lund, associate professor of Spanish, on the poetics of paramilitarism

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

“When we think about paramilitarism, we tend to think about a rather contemporary history around counterinsurgency warfare, but that moment is actually linked to a much longer history that goes back to the very formation of modern American states,” said Joshua Lund, associate professor of Spanish at the University of Notre Dame. Lund studies Latin American film, literature, and cultural politics. His published works include two books, The Mestizo State (2012) and The Impure Imagination (2006), a co-edited volume of scholarship on Gilberto Freyre, and essays on a range of cultural topics.

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Annual research funding at Notre Dame tops $128 million

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Professor Amy Hixon works with an undergraduate researcher in her Stinson-Remick Lab, Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental and Earth Studies

The University of Notre Dame has received $128 million in research funding for fiscal year 2016 — the second highest in its history. In fiscal year 2015, the University’s research funding was its highest of all time, reaching $133 million.

“The research, scholarship and creativity of Notre Dame faculty continues to make a difference in multiple ways across our country and around the world,” said Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., the University’s president. “The growth in external funding is a tangible testimony to the importance of their work.”

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In Fifty Years with Father Hesburgh, Schmuhl paints warm portrait of former president

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, C.S.C., president of the University of Notre Dame from 1952 to 1987, was one of the nation’s most influential figures in higher education and national affairs and a well-known figure on campus. In the 1960s, a student named Robert Schmuhl, covering what Father Hesburgh called “the student revolution” for the Associated Press, began what would be a lifelong relationship with the president. Schmuhl, now the Walter H. Annenberg-Edmund P. Joyce Chair in American Studies and Journalism at Notre Dame, is the author of Fifty Years with Father Hesburgh: On and Off the Record, released Aug. 25 by University of Notre Dame Press.

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Anthropologist wins ACLS fellowship to digitally analyze Brazilian indigenous language

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

When the Wauja people tell a story about their history and culture, the words they choose convey a deep meaning about the indigenous Brazilian tribe’s interconnectedness to its landscape. Christopher Ball wants to delve into that relationship between language and place. Funded by an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship, the assistant professor of anthropology is exploring how the Wauja people use words to create an identity that ties their culture to a nearby river and chronicling that meaning for future generations.

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English professor wins ACLS fellowship to study medieval marginalia

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Kathryn Kerby-Fulton studies medieval texts, many of them on sheepskins and fragile after hundreds of years in conditions not always suited for preservation. The Notre Dame Professor of English studies the margins of these medieval texts, which contain thoughts scrawled by some of the brightest minds of the time. They are a layer of interaction and understanding that Kerby-Fulton will spend the next year studying, supported by a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. 

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Scholar of Portuguese language, Brazilian culture joins Arts and Letters faculty

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Marcio Bahia is coming to Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures with his eyes focused squarely on Brazil. A scholar of Brazilian culture and language, Bahia will join the College of Arts and Letters faculty this fall with a focus on accelerating the growth of the Portuguese program.

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LEO study on homelessness prevention published in Science

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

A study of the Homelessness Prevention Call Center in Chicago by the Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities found that such hotlines have a considerable effect on people facing homelessness, and that emergency financial assistance successfully prevents homelessness — if funding is available. The study, published in the Aug. 12 edition of Science, examines the impact of financial assistance for 4,500 individuals and families who called the HPCC between 2010 and 2012.

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Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute names Thomas E. Burman new director

Thomas E. Burman, an esteemed scholar of medieval Christianity and Islam, has been named the Robert Conway Director of the University of Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute. Burman, currently a professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will begin his new role in January 2017.

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Three Questions with Latino Theologian Peter J. Casarella

Peter Casarella

Peter Casarella, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame and interim director of Latin American/North American Church Concerns (LANACC), is a scholar of Latino theology. Before joining the Notre Dame faculty in 2013, he served as professor of Catholic studies at DePaul University where he was director of the Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology. In an interview, he discusses his research, Pope Francis, and the future of Latin American/North American Church Concerns, of which he is interim director.

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Global Affairs Scholar to Join Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs, Department of Sociology

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Internationalism

Tamara Kay

Tamara Kay, a scholar with extensive experience in Latin America and Africa, will join the new Keough School of Global Affairs as associate professor of global affairs, according to Scott Appleby, Marilyn Keough Dean of the Keough School. Kay will hold a joint appointment in the Notre Dame Department of Sociology.

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Three Questions with Political Philosopher Patrick Deneen

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Patrick Deneen

A member of the University of Notre Dame political science faculty since 2012, Patrick Deneen is the David A. Potenziani Memorial Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies. He teaches and writes about the history of political thought, American political thought, religion and politics, and literature and politics. Books he has published on these subjects include The Odyssey of Political Theory, Democratic Faith, Democracy’s Literature, The Democratic Soul, and Redeeming Democracy in America.

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In Memoriam: Bernard E. Doering, Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages and Literatures

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Faculty News and General News

Bernard Doering

Bernard E. Doering, professor emeritus of Romance languages and literatures at the University of Notre Dame, died July 9. He was 91. A member of the Notre Dame faculty since 1965, Doering became a popular and affectionately regarded teacher and mentor. Among the pioneers of the University’s international studies programs, he played an indispensable role in establishing and developing the Notre Dame program in Angers, France.

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Center for Theology, Science and Human Flourishing Appoints New Assistant Director

Author: Katie Zakas Rutledge

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Terrence Ehrman

The Center for Theology, Science and Human Flourishing at the University of Notre Dame has named Rev. Terrence P. Ehrman, C.S.C., its assistant director of life sciences research and outreach. Ehrman will expand the center’s portfolio of life sciences research projects and oversee the center’s outreach efforts across campus and more broadly.

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Three Questions with Political Science Associate Professor Christina Wolbrecht

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Christina-Wolbrecht-release

Christina Wolbrecht, associate professor of political science, C. Robert and Margaret Hanley Family Director of the Notre Dame Washington Program, and director of the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy at the University of Notre Dame, teaches and writes about American politics, political parties, women and politics, and American political development. Now at work on a study of the first 100 years of women as voters in American politics, she is co-author, with J. Kevin Corder, of the recently published book Counting Women’s Ballots: Female Voters from Suffrage through the New Deal.

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Historian Wins Phi Beta Kappa Award for Book on Philology

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Phi Beta Kappa

For his book pulling together the complex history of philology and how Western humanistic learning split into the modern humanities that we know today, Notre Dame historian James Turner has received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award. The honor is given for books in literary scholarship or criticism and is named for a distinguished Princeton University scholar, teacher, and dean. Turner’s book, Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities, looks at how learned researchers once included languages, history, and texts in a single broad field of study that came to be known as philology.

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Video: William Collins Donahue on the Resonance of Small Moments in Holocaust Literature

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

William Collins Donahue

“Early literary encounters with the Holocaust tended to tell you about the whole event, but now when the Holocaust appears, generally speaking, it appears in small moments, in kind of passing glances,” said William Collins Donahue, the John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities and chair of the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures at the University of Notre Dame. Donahue has researched extensively in the areas of literary realism and modernism, especially the work of Elias Canetti. Now focusing primarily on Holocaust literature, Donahue is developing an analogy for how the Holocaust appears in contemporary narratives. These small episodes, Donahue said, are similar to the Stolpersteine, a worldwide movement of small pavement stones, each commemorating a victim in the Holocaust.

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Video: Theology Professor Khaled Anatolios on Studying the Origins of Christian Doctrines

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Khaled Anatolios Icon

“I tend to gravitate towards doctrines that seem inexplicable, and I try to understand what motivated the early Christians to formulate these doctrines in just these ways,” said Khaled Anatolios, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. Anatolios specializes in the theology of the early Church. As a Byzantine Catholic priest, he has a special interest in the doctrines of the Greek fathers as well as complementary ideas between the Eastern and Western traditions. His current research focuses on the doctrine of salvation, particularly the disconnect between classical sources and modern experience.

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Video: Theology Professor Robin Jensen on Understanding Early Christian Art and Architecture

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Robin Jensen

“It’s my conviction that the best way to know about how early Christians worshipped — even what they believed — is to try to get as much information as we can about where they lived and what they saw, not just what they wrote and what they read,” said Robin Jensen, the Patrick O’Brien Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. Jensen researches topics at the intersections of Christian art, architecture, liturgy, and theology. Her forthcoming book examines the history of the cross from a variety of liturgical and social perspectives, both in ancient times and in contemporary culture.

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CEC Director to Deliver Inaugural Law & Justice Lecture at University of Florence

Author: Kenneth Hallenius

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Internationalism

O. Carter Snead

Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture director and professor of law Carter Snead will deliver the inaugural University of Florence “Law and Justice Lecture” on May 30 in Florence, Italy. His lecture, “Three Regulatory Models for Stem Cell Research,” will analyze and contrast the U.S. government’s federal funding policies under Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama as a means of exploring the complexities of American governance of science, medicine, and biotechnology in the name of ethical goods.

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Nature and Nurture Are Both Important, Anthropologist Argues in New Journal Article

Author: William G. Gilroy

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Agustín Fuentes

Evolutionary science stresses the contributions biology makes to our behavior. Some anthropologists try to understand how societies and histories construct our identities, and others ask about how genes and the environment do the same thing. Which is the better approach? Both are needed, Notre Dame biological anthropologist Agustín Fuentes argues in a forthcoming paper in the journal Current Anthropology.

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Video: Historian Darren Dochuk on the Power of Religion and Oil in America

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Darren Dochuk

Notre Dame historian Darren Dochuk’s research primarily focuses on the United States in the long 20th century, with emphasis on religion, politics, and the rising influence of the American West and Sunbelt Southwest in national life. His current project examines religion and politics in North America’s age of oil, 1890 to the present, through the lens of two prominent oil families, the Rockefellers and the Pews. “Oil sparked a certain imagination of progress, a certain ambition for American dominance in the world in the twentieth century, and then religion helped frame that imagination,” he said.

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Classics Scholar Traces History of Saint Augustine's Words

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Hildegund Müller

Augustine of Hippo is recognized as one of the most important church fathers and greatest thinkers of Christianity. While many theologians and philosophers study his work, Hildegund Müller, associate professor of classics and associate vice president for research at Notre Dame, takes a different approach to reading Augustine’s texts. Müller’s research is influenced by her philological background and study of literary detail in texts, especially in her current project, A Reading of Augustine’s Sermons, which includes an edition of a selection of his preaching on the Psalms.

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