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Anthropologist Agustín Fuentes Explains “Planet of the Apes” Fascination

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Rise of the Planet of the Apes, opening nationwide Friday, is expected to be a summer blockbuster. So what’s the fascination with apes taking over? Why not Planet of the Dogs or Planet of the Seagulls? “The lure of the Planet of the Apes movies lies in our fascination with the possibility that we are not the only sentient beings on earth,” says University of Notre Dame anthropologist Agustin Fuentes, who specializes in human evolution and primatology.

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Notre Dame and Sprint To Study Wireless and Social Networking Habits

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Does mobile technology actually help students to learn to better express themselves and ultimately enhance their face-to-face interactions? This is one of many questions that sociologists David Hachen and Omar Lizardo will try to answer as part of a pioneering three-year study by the University of Notre Dame’s Wireless Institute.

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Economist Abigail Wozniak Studies Decline in Long-Distance Moves

Author: Susan Guibert and Paul Murphy

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

While Americans have a storied past with internal migration dating back hundreds of years, the number of people relocating within the U.S. has dropped to a 30-year low. University of Notre Dame economist Abigail Wozniak, together with Raven Molloy and Christopher Smith of the Federal Reserve, reviewed 30 years of data and found that the recent slump in the housing market and economic conditions play little part in the decline.

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Anthropologist Rahul Oka Shares Insights on Somalia Famine

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

By flip-flopping its position on which groups can provide humanitarian aid to the thousands of starving Somalians, and forbidding supplies from foreign agencies not currently working in its strongholds, the al-Qaida-linked militant group al-Shabab is “playing an interesting game,” says University of Notre Dame economic anthropologist Rahul Oka, who currently is in Kenya at the Kakuma Refugee Camp conducting fieldwork on trade and the distribution of relief supplies.

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Workshop Focuses on Philosophy of Astronomy

Author: Gene Stowe

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Matt Dowd missed the first Biennial History of Astronomy Workshop, organized in 1993 by Michael J. Crowe, but he has the group photo to prove he was part of the second event in 1995. Crowe, the Rev. John J. Cavanaugh Professor Emeritus in Humanities in the Program of Liberal Studies, was Dowd’s dissertation adviser for the Ph.D. he received in 2003 in the history and philosophy of science.

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Political Scientist Michael Desch on Solving Israel-Palestine Conflict

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The results of a recent Zogby poll confirm the growing anti-American attitude of most of the Arab world, and President Obama’s lack of meaningful action in the Israeli-Palestine conflict can be blamed for a good portion of it, according to Michael Desch, chair of the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science and fellow in the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

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Study Links Cell Phone Usage and Relationship Strength

Author: Renee Hochstetler

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

A project on the dynamics of social networks at the University of Notre Dame’s Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications (iCeNSA) has found a link between cell phone usage and relationship strength. To conduct the study, sociologists David Hachen and Omar Lizardo collaborated with faculty members from the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics, the Department of Computer Science, and the Department of Physics.

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Political Scientist Vincent Phillip Muñoz Wins Book Award

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Vincent Phillip Muñoz has been named a winner of the 2011 American Political Science Association’s Hubert Morken Award for his book God and the Founders: Madison, Washington, and Jefferson (Cambridge University Press). Muñoz, the Tocqueville Associate Professor of Religion and Public Life at the University of Notre Dame, will receive this biennial prize for the best book in religion and politics at the association’s annual meeting in early September.

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Christine Becker Book on Film Stars Wins International Prize

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

Christine Becker, an associate professor in the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television, and Theatre, has received the 2011 Michael Nelson Prize from the International Association for Media and History for her book It’s the Pictures that Got Small: Hollywood Film Stars on 1950’s Television.

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Stuart Greene Honored for Civic Engagement

Author: William Schmitt

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Campus Compact, a coalition of more than 1,100 college and university presidents, has named Stuart Greene, an Institute for Educational Initiatives fellow and director of the Education, Schooling, and Society (ESS) program at the University of Notre Dame, one of four finalists for the 2011 Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award.

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Psychologist Darcia Narvaez Comments on Video Game Ruling and Moral Development

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Monday’s Supreme Court ruling on the sale of violent video games to minors may have been a victory for free speech, but raises an important issue: Do violent video games really harm kids? Absolutely, according to Darcia Narvaez, a University of Notre Dame psychology professor who researches the effect of violent video games on the developing brains of children and teens.

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Anthropologist Catherine Bolten Reveals Human Side of Sierra Leone

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

An army officer betrayed by the government and put on trial for a treasonous crime he didn’t commit. A market trader who forges an alliance with a rebel leader in order to feed her starving children. And a man who almost gets himself killed several times in order to get food for his pregnant wife. These are among the scores of survivors Notre Dame anthropologist Catherine Bolten came to know during more than seven years researching post–war Sierra Leone.

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Research on Christian School Graduates Yields Surprising Results

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

In the first study of its kind on K-12 Christian education in North America, University of Notre Dame sociologist David Sikkink, in partnership with Cardus—a public policy think tank—found that while Protestant Christian school graduates show uncommon commitment to their families and churches, donate more money than graduates of other schools, and divorce less, they also have lower incomes, less education, and are less engaged in politics than their Catholic and non-religious private school peers.

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