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Sociologist Jennifer Jones to Convene Afro-Latino Conference

Jennifer Jones

Jennifer Jones, Institute for Latino Studies faculty fellow and assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology, will convene a conference on Afro-Latinos in Movement: Critical Approaches to Blackness and Transnationalism in the Americas on October 31, 2014. The conference and an accompanying volume, for which Professor Jones will serve as co-editor, explore broad questions of black identity and representation, transnationalism and diaspora, with a particular interest in research on Afro-Latinos in the United States.

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FTT Students Shine at National Auditions

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Alumni, Arts, and Faculty News

Zuri Eshun '14

“Imagine a kind of live, national GRE exam where students audition in open competition against one another, evaluated by representatives from the best graduate theatre programs,” said Professor Jim Collins, chair of the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT). Notre Dame had record success in 2014 at the national auditions organized by the University/Resident Theatre organization (URTA), with six of the seven FTT students who auditioned receiving offers from graduate programs in attendance.

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Reilly Center Expands Programs for Graduate Students

Author: Ginna Anderson

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Anjan Chakravartty

The John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values has expanded its menu of training options for University of Notre Dame graduate students. Since August 2013, three supplementary training and degree programs have been added and are open for graduate student enrollment. The new offerings advance understanding of the connections between science, technology, and society while broadening a traditional Ph.D. or Master’s degree program of study.

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Video: Ann Mische on Peacemaking and Our Perceptions of the Future

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Ann Mische

“The capacity to project into the future is an essential component of our agency as human beings. It’s in our imaginations, yet it has a real impact upon what we do. It draws us forward in different ways,” said Ann Mische, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Sociology and the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

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Notre Dame Sociologists Explore the Paradox of Generosity

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

The Paradox of Generosity, by Christian Smith and Hilary Davidson

For most religious believers, it is an article of faith that it is more blessed to give than to receive. For at least two University of Notre Dame sociologists, it is an article of fact as well. In their recently published book, The Paradox of Generosity: Giving We Receive, Grasping We Lose, Christian Smith, Notre Dame’s William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology, and sociology doctoral candidate Hilary Davidson provide empirical evidence in support of the biblical admonition. According to their analysis of measurable data, people who are generous with their money, time, and associations are happier, healthier, and more resilient than their less generous counterparts.

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Notre Dame Music Faculty Builds Scholarly Connections in Asia

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

Beijing Global Gateway

Three faculty members from Notre Dame’s Department of Music embarked today, October 7, on a 12-day tour to Asia, building scholarly and cultural connections with universities in China and South Korea. Professor Peter Smith, chair of the department, Professor John Blacklow, an award-winning pianist, and Assistant Professional Specialist Tricia Park, a critically acclaimed violinist, will travel to Shanghai, Beijing, and Seoul. The trio will present lectures and performances, including one at Beijing’s Capital Library, in conjunction with the U.S. Embassy.

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Philosopher's Software Program Mines, Analyzes Digitized Documents

Author: Gene Stowe

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Grant Ramsey

Notre Dame Philosopher Grant Ramsey’s laboratory has produced a Big Data search-and-analysis tool to explore questions of definition, revolution, and trending in science. The application, evoText, already has access to a half-million articles, and pending agreements will add millions more. Ramsey, an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy and a fellow at the Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, came to Notre Dame in 2007.

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Notre Dame to Establish Keough School of Global Affairs; Scott Appleby Appointed Founding Dean

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Scott Appleby

The University of Notre Dame announced on Wednesday, October 1, the creation of the first new college or school at the University in nearly a century—the Donald R. Keough School of Global Affairs. R. Scott Appleby, a scholar of global religion and a member of Notre Dame’s faculty since 1994, will serve as the Marilyn Keough Dean of the school.

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ND Expert: Hong Kong Movement Unlike Any Other

Author: Shannon Chapla

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Victoria Hui

Hong Kong marked China’s National Day (October 1) in unprecedented fashion, as pro-democracy protesters crowded the streets of the Asian financial hub for what is being called a critical day in the territory’s “Umbrella Revolution.” University of Notre Dame political scientist and Hong Kong native Victoria Hui has worked in the democracy movement there. She says it is unlike any other.

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NSF Funds V-Dem Research on Consequences of Democratization

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Michael Coppedge

The National Science Foundation has awarded $277,000 to three members of the Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem) team for research that uses new data to identify the impact of specific types of democracy on economic development and infrastructure. A $77,588 share of the grant goes to Michael Coppedge, a professor in the Department of Political Science, one of V-Dem’s four PIs.

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Notre Dame Theologian Rev. Brian Daley to Receive Wright Prize from Fellowship of Catholic Scholars

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Rev. Brian E. Daley, S.J.

Rev. Brian E. Daley, S.J., Catherine F. Huisking Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame, will be awarded the John Cardinal Wright Prize by the Fellowship of Catholic Scholars at its annual meeting in Pittsburgh on Saturday, September 27. A member of the Notre Dame faculty since 1996, Father Daley, a Jesuit priest, is an internationally renowned scholar of the writings, sayings, and lives of the earliest Christians.

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Notre Dame Reports Highest Level of Research Funding in a Non-Stimulus Year

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

research

The University of Notre Dame received $113 million in research awards for fiscal year 2014, the highest ever recorded at the University in a non-stimulus year and a $17 million increase over the previous year. Notre Dame received $119 million in 2010, but approximately $30 million was from government stimulus grants through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

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Notre Dame Hosts Parenting Conference for Local Parents and Practitioners

Author: Jane Murphy

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Darcia Narvaez

On Saturday, September 27, the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Children and Families and the Department of Psychology will partner with Attachment Parenting International to host a day-long parenting conference, Nourishing Parents for Child Well-Being, bringing together scholars, practitioners, and professionals who work with children and families. As part of the Pathways to Child Flourishing symposium, presenters at the workshop will address a variety of topics, including birth, breastfeeding, sleep, discipline, and adult-child relationships.

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Campus Crossroads Project. Anthropology: An Audacious Plan

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Faculty News

Agustín Fuentes

The east building of the Campus Crossroads project will provide classrooms, offices, laboratories, and a student lounge for the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. Construction is expected to start in November and be finished in 33 months. “This new facility is going to allow us to have this social nexus that is also an intellectual nexus,” said Agustin Fuentes, the department chair. “We’re going to get together and think together and use what anthropology has in the context of the Notre Dame environment to go out and change the world.”

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Father Gutierrez to Receive 2014 Gittler Prize

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Rev. Gustavo Gutierrez, O.P.

Rev. Gustavo Gutierrez, O.P., John Cardinal O’Hara Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame, will receive the 2014 Joseph B. and Toby Gittler Prize from Brandeis University. Established in 2007, the Gittler Prize is annually awarded to a person whose body of published work reflects scholarly excellence and makes a lasting contribution to racial, ethnic, or religious relations. It will be formally presented to Father Gutierrez in a ceremony and talk on Sunday, October 5.

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Alumnus Jeff Spoonhower Brings Digital Media Expertise to FTT

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Alumni, Arts, and Faculty News

Jeff Spoonhower ’99

Jeff Spoonhower ’99 has been appointed assistant professor of film and digital media production in Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT). A 12-year veteran of the video game and animation industries, Spoonhower shares with students the very same production techniques and tools he uses in his award-winning professional work.

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Psychology: Finding Solutions to Real-Life Problems

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Faculty News

Daniel Lapsley

A famous psychological test asks children to sit in a room with a marshmallow or cookie for 15 minutes. Those who can delay gratification and endure the torture of temptation get a second sweet treat as reward. Their self-discipline is also likely to lead to success later in life. The Notre Dame Department of Psychology turns 50 next year, and its patience and growth will soon generate a significant reward —a new building attached to Notre Dame Stadium to call its home. The East building of the Campus Crossroads project will provide classrooms, offices, laboratories, and a student lounge for the Departments of Psychology and Anthropology. Construction is expected to start in November and be finished in 33 months.

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Campus Crossroads Construction to Begin in November

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Faculty News

Campus Crossroads Project

Construction on Campus Crossroads, a $400 million project that will use the University of Notre Dame’s iconic football stadium as a hub for new facilities supporting academic and student life initiatives, will begin in November, after the final home game of the season. “We announced this project in January with the hope—though not necessarily the expectation—that we could begin in November,” Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., said. “Thanks to the tireless work of many, plans have been finalized and funds have been raised so that we can, indeed, commence construction on facilities that will unite and inspire every member of our campus community for decades to come.”

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Award-winning Book Offers New Theory on Democratization in Latin America

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Research, Alumni, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Scott Mainwaring

A new book coauthored by Scott Mainwaring, Eugene and Helen Conley Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, and Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, an alumnus of the University, presents a striking new theory of democratization that has earned it two major prizes in comparative politics. Mainwaring, a faculty fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and Pérez Liñán, a Notre Dame Ph.D. who is now an associate professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh, spent a decade thinking about theories of regime change and analyzing political regimes in Latin America.

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ND Expert: Don’t Panic Over ISIS

Author: Shannon Chapla

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Michael Desch

As the Islamic State extremist group, commonly referred to as ISIS, shocks the world with its brutality and takes control of more territory in the region, Michael Desch, professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, says the U.S. should take ISIS seriously and stop its progress, but not panic. “ISIS is a serious local threat in Syria and Iraq, but does not yet pose a direct threat to the United States,” says Desch, an expert on international security and American foreign and defense policies. “While the presence of Western nationals in their ranks is worrisome, they have the greatest potential to do mischief in the weak states in the region, two of which we have created in Syria and Iraq with ill-advised policies.”

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Notre Dame’s Center for Civil and Human Rights Awarded Grant to Study Christian Persecution

Daniel Philpott

The University of Notre Dame’s Center for Civil and Human Rights and the Religious Freedom Project at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University have been awarded a grant from the Templeton Religion Trust to study and report on the persecution of Christian communities around the world.

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Notre Dame’s Lab for Economic Opportunities Endowed with $15 Million Gift

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

leo_icon

The Wilson Sheehan Foundation has made a $15 million gift to the University of Notre Dame to endow the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO), a recent University initiative that seeks to reduce poverty in the United States.

“We are immensely grateful to the Wilson Sheehan Foundation for a gift that supports the missions of both the foundation and Notre Dame: to be a force for good in the world,” said Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., the University’s president. “By endowing the work of LEO researchers, the foundation is supporting and challenging them to find enduring solutions to poverty in America.”

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Ebrahim Moosa, Leading Scholar of Islamic Thought, Joins ND Faculty

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Ebrahim Moosa

Ebrahim E.I. Moosa, a leading scholar of Islamic thought, philosophy and literature, has been appointed professor of Islamic studies at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and in the Department of History. Moosa will co-direct, with Scott Appleby, Contending Modernities, the global research and education initiative examining the interaction among Catholic, Muslim, and other religious and secular forces in the world.

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Fulbright Foreign Language Teachers Introduced to American Culture at Notre Dame

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

globeicon

The University of Notre Dame is hosting its ninth Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant (FLTA) orientation for the upcoming academic year. Sixty teachers from 28 countries, representing 15 languages, are staying on campus Aug. 9-13 (Saturday-Wednesday) and will attend a series of workshops designed to enhance their teaching in the United States.

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ND Expert: Persecution of Christians Not Confined to Iraq

Daniel Philpott

As some 100,000 people flee the town and region of Qaraqosh, the largest Christian town in Iraq, international attention is being drawn to a worldwide human rights violation that has received too little notice for too long, according to Daniel Philpott, professor of political science and peace studies and director of the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Civil and Human Rights.

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ND Expert: Chinese Government Threatened by Christianity

Author: Shannon Chapla

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Lionel Jensen hp crop

Government authorities in southeast China are continuing what local church leaders call a campaign against Christianity—knocking down crosses and razing sanctuaries at dozens of churches in the Zhejiang province. Christianity has grown so rapidly, it’s viewed as a threat by the Communist government, according to Lionel Jensen, associate professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Notre Dame.

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Video: Mary Celeste Kearney on Filmmaking and Girls' Media Culture

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Mary Celeste Kearney

“The world of filmmaking and television production is dominated by men’s voices. We are not seeing enough representations that are actually from a girl or a woman’s perspective,” said Mary Celeste Kearney, associate professor of film, television, and theatre and a senior fellow in the gender studies program at the University of Notre Dame.

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Tea Party Support Linked to Educational Segregation, New Study Shows

Author: Shannon Chapla

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

tea_party_2010_icon

In January 2009, Barack Obama assumed the U.S. presidency in the midst of the most severe recession since the great depression of the 1930s. While many Americans hoped the new administration would take an active role in providing relief for those harmed by the economic collapse, a “Tea Party” movement emerged to oppose Obama’s agenda.

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