Latest News

Two Graduate Students Named to Humanities Without Walls’ Career-Focused Fellowship Program

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Research

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Two Notre Dame graduate students have won fellowships from Humanities WIthout Walls, a consortium funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that aims to support collaborative research and scholarship across the humanities. Michael Skaggs, who is pursuing a Ph.D. in history, and Courtney Smotherman, a student in the Ph.D. in Literature program, were among a cohort of 30 predoctoral fellows selected by HWW, based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. They will attend three weeks of summer workshops designed to encourage doctoral students to explore careers both inside and outside the academy.

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Three Notre Dame Faculty Receive Fellowships from National Endowment for the Humanities

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

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Three faculty from the University of Notre Dame received fellowships this week from the National Endowment for the Humanities, continuing the University’s record success winning support for humanities research. Receiving the grants are Julia Douthwaite, a professor of French; Amy Mulligan, an assistant professor of Irish language and literature; and Gabriel Said Reynolds, a professor of Islamic studies and theology. Since 1999, College of Arts and Letters faculty have won 57 NEH fellowships—more than any other private university in the country.

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Shamrock Series Academic Events to Tackle Irish History, Research on Poverty

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

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A football game isn’t the only thing Notre Dame is bringing to Boston in late November. As part of a weekend of events surrounding the Shamrock Series, Notre Dame’s annual home-away-from-home football game, the College of Arts and Letters will host a pair of academic conversations the day before the Fighting Irish face Boston College at Fenway Park. Notre Dame historians will offer an interdisciplinary look at the impact of Irish immigration on American religious and political structures, as well as the role of the U.S. in the 1916 Easter Rising, while economists will discuss research initiatives that aim to change the way humanitarian services help the poor both domestically and abroad.

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Six New History Faculty Bring Transnational Research and Teaching Interests to Department

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

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They bring expertise in subjects that span physical borders and chronological boundaries. They bring passion to their research and energy to their classrooms. And the six new faculty members joining the Department of History this fall bring additional prestige to an already elite group of academics. “For a long period of time, we’ve been working to assemble a group of scholars that could work across national boundaries, redefining the department and what it does," said Patrick Griffin, chair of the department.

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Scholars Gather in Rome to Bridge Migrant Issues

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

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An interdisciplinary symposium hosted this week by the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies aims to facilitate conversation and collaboration between scholars from the United States and Italy who are researching issues related to immigration. “Transnational Migration in Comparative Perspective: Italy and the United States” offers the chance for academics to learn from one another about immigration experiences and discuss ways that research can better inform policymakers.

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History Ph.D. Students Win Major Fellowships and Grants

Notre Dame Academic Seal

The projects took them them to Italy, Switzerland, Germany, and England. The research offers new insights into the Renaissance, Protestantism, immigrant religiousness, monks, and begging practices. Eight graduate students from Notre Dame’s Department of History received competitive fellowships or grants in support of their research—awards including a Rome Prize, a Fulbright, and Louisville Institute, Newcombe, and Schallek fellowships.

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Spanish Students Connect with South Bend Through Community-Based Learning

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Undergraduate News, General News, Faculty News, and Centers and Institutes

Community-based learning with Spanish majors at Notre Dame

Through a series of new community-based learning Spanish courses at Notre Dame, undergraduates are improving their language skills both inside and outside the classroom. The learning model is based on the idea that a faculty member and local organization leader are co-educators—the experience is designed to be mutually beneficial to both the class and the community group. Spanish students in intermediate-level and community-based learning classes now average about 3,000 hours of service per year in South Bend.

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Theatre Alumnus Jack Blakey Appointed to Federal Judgeship

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News and Alumni

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When Jack Blakey was studying theatre at Notre Dame in the 1980s, he never dreamed he would one day be hearing legal disputes on the federal bench. But his liberal arts courses were preparing him for it nonetheless. Blakey was formally installed this spring as a judge of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, following his nomination by President Barack Obama and confirmation by the U.S. Senate last year.

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LEO Receives $435,000 NIH Grant to Study Impact of Community College Intervention Program

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

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Notre Dame’s Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities has received a $435,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health for a two-year study of Stay the Course, a program designed to keep low-income community college students on the path to academic success. Participants are paired with a case manager who offers guidance and support on how to stay on track to graduate or transfer to a four-year college. They are also directed to affordable child care or other social services that will aid them in their pursuit of an education.

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Notre Dame Graduate Wins Prestigious Native American Internship in Washington, D.C.

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

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Before he heads to law school, Notre Dame graduate Tyler Barron ’15 will have a front-row seat for the lawmaking process. Barron, a sociology and American studies major, has been selected for the Udall Foundation’s Native American Congressional Internship Program in Washington, D.C. He will work for 10 weeks this summer with U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Arizona.

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Anthropology Ph.D. Program Establishes Strong Reputation in First Year

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, and Research

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Under the leadership of Ian Kuijt, director of graduate studies, seven first-year Ph.D. students encountered a curriculum focused on integrative anthropology—studying approaches and methods across a range of subfields. Next year, the program will add six students, who chose Notre Dame over several other elite institutions.

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Sociology Course Helps Students Prepare for International Field Research

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, and General News

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Undergraduate research projects are transformed from broad ideas to focused realities in International Research Design, a new course in the Department of Sociology developed by Erin Metz McDonnell. Offered for the first time this spring, the class covered the fundamental elements of an international research project, from conception to execution.

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Medical Anthropologist Natalie Porter to Join Faculty

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News and Faculty News

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Medical anthropologist Natalie Porter will join Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology as an assistant professor in fall 2015. As a researcher studying health and biosafety issues associated with human-animal interactions and laboratory experiments, Porter will bring a “distinctive and engaging” scholarly presence, said Professor Agustín Fuentes, chair of the department.

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Scholar of African American Literature to Join Department of English

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: General News and Faculty News

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Jarvis C. McInnis, a scholar whose research blends African American and African diaspora literature with music and visual culture, will join Notre Dame’s Department of English as an assistant professor in fall 2016. In studying what he has deemed the “global black South,” McInnis examines the looming sociopolitical and cultural presence of the plantation in the U.S. South and the Caribbean in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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