Latest News

Latest News » Archives » 2019

2019 Naughton Fellowship awardees announced

Author: Joanne Fahey

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Twenty-one students have been announced as awardees of the Naughton Fellowships for 2019. The research fellowships were awarded to undergraduate and master's students from the University of Notre Dame and from five universities in Ireland. This year’s winners from Notre Dame represent the Colleges of Arts and Letters, Engineering, and Science.

Read More

Philosophy professor Meghan Sullivan named director of Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Categories: Faculty News, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

As of July 1, Sullivan will oversee the Institute, including its flagship residential fellowship and graduate student fellowship programs. In conjunction with Sullivan’s directorship, the Institute has added a thematic option to its 2020-2021 call for fellowship applications — “the nature of trust.”

Read More

Video: Theologian on early Christian reception of the New Testament

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, Catholicism, Research, and General News

“By reading the Bible along with some of its earliest interpreters in antiquity, it's actually strange, unsettling, unsystematic. It's full of surprises,” said Nathan Eubank, associate professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. Eubank’s research centers on the Synoptic Gospels and the writings of Paul, particularly in light of ancient Biblical interpretation. He is currently writing a book on merit in early Christianity — the ability to gain salvation through good actions.

Read More

Face to face: Arts and Letters community-based classes help students learn Spanish

While there are more than 200 community-based classes across Notre Dame, few faculty members have jumped in with more commitment than those in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, especially those teaching Spanish. CBL classes engage in a sustained partnership with community centers and schools through service or educational activities relevant to coursework. Spanish students in these classes average about 1,500 hours of service per year in South Bend.

Read More

de Nicola Center fellow appointed as Companion of the Order of Australia

Author: Kenneth Hallenius

Categories: Faculty News and General News

In the Queen’s Birthday Honours announced on June 10, 2019, John M. Finnis, a permanent senior distinguished research fellow of the de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture and the Biolchini Family Professor of Law at Notre Dame Law School, was appointed as a Companion [AC] of the Order of Australia. The honor was granted with the citation, “For eminent service to the law, and to education, to legal theory and philosophical enquiry, and as a leading jurist, academic and author.”

Read More

Felipe Fernandez-Armesto publishes book on the history of human imagination

Author: Joanna Byrne

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, and General News

Felipe Fernández-Armesto, the William P. Reynolds Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters is the author of a new book on the journey of human imagination throughout history. Fernández-Armesto is currently teaching in London at the London Global Gateway. Titled Out of Our Minds: A History of What We Think and How We Came to Think It, the book examines science, politics, religion, culture, philosophy and history in order to tell the story of human imagination from the beginning of civilization to the modern day.

Read More

How two very different majors — Africana studies and biology — help Shelene Baiyee understand the world

Author: Hailey Oppenlander

Categories: Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Shelene Baiyee’s time at Notre Dame has been characterized by connection – whether it’s with faculty, other students, or seemingly unrelated subject matters. The rising senior may be busy with clubs, service, research, and more, but never loses sight of what drives her forward — the connection between it all. “It’s really important, especially as a black female in America, to understand the history of race in America, and to acknowledge a lot of history that has been left out of history books,” she said. “Having two extremely different majors allows you to see the interconnectedness of certain topics and life in general, because what you can understand through science can be aided by history.”

Read More

Video: The design major at Notre Dame

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Arts, Undergraduate News, and General News

What is the design major like at Notre Dame? “If you're creative minded and like solving problems, I would say this is the perfect major for you,” said industrial design major Alexis Dorsey. Design majors pursue their passions while developing skills such as critical and analytical thinking, research, ideation and implementation, and visual literacy.

Read More

Economists to present model showing success of unconventional monetary policies to Fed officials

Author: Colleen Sharkey

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

With the backdrop of the Great Recession in mind, but with the economy on the mend, the Federal Reserve launched a review in 2018 to closely examine U.S. monetary policy to see if it could be made more robust. Notre Dame associate professors of economics Cynthia Wu and Eric Sims were solicited to contribute a paper on assessing the agency’s tools for dealing with economic decline. They will present to Fed Chairman Jerome Powell and other high-level economists at a Fed conference in Chicago on June 4 and 5.

Read More

Rallying around Puerto Rico: A&L faculty, students explore hurricane recovery efforts

Author: Brendan O'Shaughnessy

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

After Hurricane María caused severe damage to Puerto Rico in September 2017, critics said federal government aid was too little, too late. Other organizations saw the need and decided to step in, including Notre Dame. Here are recent efforts, including the faculty-led Listening to Puerto Rico project and a spring break storytelling trip by journalism students..

Read More

In memoriam: Richard Lamanna, 86, associate professor emeritus of sociology

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News and General News

Richard “Dick” Lamanna, an associate professor emeritus in the Department of Sociology, died Wednesday (May 22) at his home in Holy Cross Village. He was 86. A Notre Dame faculty member for more than 35 years who served as department chair on multiple occasions, his research focused on urban sociology, race and ethnic relations, religious beliefs and practices, and urban poverty.

Read More

Year abroad helps Italian major develop language skills, discover senior thesis topic, and strengthen connection to family heritage

Author: Hailey Oppenlander

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

Gianna Van Heel’s time studying abroad while at Notre Dame was immersive and comprehensive — the nearly yearlong experience included coursework, research, an internship, and embracing the Italian way of life. She knew it was the best way to truly learn another language. Van Heel, who won the College of Arts and Letters’ Robert D. Nuner Award for the language major with the highest GPA, studied Dante during her time abroad and was captivated by his writing. 

Read More

Majoring in neuroscience helps Arts and Letters student research concussions, study abroad, and land a job at a big consulting firm

Author: Hailey Oppenlander

Categories: Internationalism, Research, Undergraduate News, and General News

When Joseph Weiler was 8, he sustained his first concussion — and he's wanted to study the complexities of the brain ever since. Now a neuroscience and behavior major in the College of Arts and Letters, Weiler's senior thesis oversaw the implementation of the Cogstate Cognigram — a test designed to track early cognitive symptoms of concussions — in Notre Dame’s Baraka Bouts women’s boxing competition for the last two years.

Read More

11 Arts and Letters faculty receive undergraduate teaching and advising awards

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: Faculty News and General News

Nine Arts and Letters faculty members have received Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and two have been honored with Dockweiler Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. The awards are presented by the Office of the Provost, and the recipients are selected through a process that includes peer and student nominations.

Read More

Three Arts and Letters professors named ACLS fellows

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

Two historians and one theologian are among 81 fellows named from more than 1,100 applicants in the 2019 award cycle. ACLS awardees are selected for excellence in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, and the fellowships support six to 12 months of full-time research and writing. Notre Dame winners include Yury P. Avvakumov, associate professor of theology; Katie Jarvis, assistant professor of history; and Emily Remus, assistant professor of history.

Read More

American studies professor's research explores how U.S. Catholics' quest for holy heroes leads to tensions between national, religious identities

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: Faculty News, Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

In new research, Kathleen Sprows Cummings — University of Notre Dame associate professor of American studies and director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism — chronicles how canonization, or the intricate process of naming someone a saint, prompted a minority religious group to define, defend and celebrate its American identity. Her book, A Saint of Our Own: How the Quest for a Holy Hero Helped Catholics Become American, is the first study of multiple causes for canonization within a United States context. 

Read More

Sheedy Award winner Ernesto Verdeja praised for commitment to peace and justice

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News, Internationalism, Centers and Institutes, Research, and General News

For his work in the classroom, Verdeja has been selected to receive the 2018 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award — the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters — which will be presented at a reception in his honor on May 7 at 3:30 p.m. in the McKenna Hall auditorium.

Read More

Theology and neuroscience major Sofia Carozza named valedictorian

Author: Sue Ryan

Categories: Undergraduate News and General News

Sofia Carozza, a neuroscience and behavior major in the College of Science with a supplemental major in theology and a minor in philosophy, politics, and economics, has been named valedictorian of the 2019 University of Notre Dame graduating class. Annelise Gill-Wiehl, an environmental engineering major with a minor in international development studies, has been selected as salutatorian.

Read More

A classic Notre Dame story: How the extraordinary saga of Father Hesburgh was brought to life by 19 A&L students and alumni

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Arts, Alumni, Undergraduate News, and General News

Hesburgh, a critically acclaimed documentary to be released nationwide on May 3, tells the story of Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C. — reaching far beyond the borders of the Notre Dame campus to tell an epic American saga. But the making of Hesburgh is very much a Notre Dame story. Documentary filmmaker Patrick Creadon ’89 has a history of hiring Notre Dame students and alumni — and sought out no less than 19 of them to help create Hesburgh.

Read More

English professor wins 2019 PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News and General News

Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi, assistant professor of English at the University of Notre Dame, has won the 2019 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the country’s largest peer-juried prize for novels and short stories. She won the prize for her second novel, "Call Me Zebra," which follows a young heroine as she leaves New York and retraces the path she took with her father from Iran to the United States.

Read More

PLS professor Jennifer Newsome Martin receives 2019 Frank O’Malley Undergraduate Teaching Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Faculty News and General News

The award is named for Notre Dame professor Frank O’Malley, who taught classes on the philosophy of literature for more than 40 years. Recipients are nominated by undergraduates and approved by the Student Government. Jennifer Newsome Martin, an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies with a concurrent appointment in the Department of Theology, received the award at the annual Student Leadership Banquet and will also be recognized at commencement.

Read More

A business major fell in love with anthropology, and found her career path in the process

Author: Jack Rooney

Categories: Alumni and General News

As a senior associate at KPMG, Madeline Boyer’s background in anthropology often sparks curiosity. “Everybody’s always fascinated,” said Boyer ’09. “It’s an immediate conversation starter for people.” But more than that, Boyer’s anthropology major — and her entire Arts and Letters experience — gives her an edge in her career. 

Read More

Notre Dame student volunteers introduce South Bend fifth-graders to Latin through tutoring program

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Faculty News, Undergraduate News, General News, and Graduate Students

Led by students from the University of Notre Dame, a group of 45 fifth-graders from Clay International Academy in South Bend gathered in adjacent classrooms recently to learn Latin as part of a pilot Aequora program sponsored by the Department of Classics. The program introduces K-8 students to the basics of Latin vocabulary and grammar, Roman culture and mythology and the connections between Latin, English, and Spanish with specially designed lessons and activities.

Read More

Economics and Spanish major launches student group to help prepare undergrads for careers in consulting

Author: Hailey Oppenlander

Categories: Undergraduate News and General News

One of the greatest assets of a Notre Dame degree is the University’s incredible global network. But those connections aren’t only with alumni — senior Nick Gabriele believes that, sometimes, the most important mentors can be fellow students. Gabriele, an economics and Spanish major who will begin working as a consultant with McKinsey & Company after graduation, launched Consulting Connect — an organization designed to educate students about the diverse field of consulting, prepare them for the recruiting process, and connect them with potential employers.

Read More

Two Notre Dame faculty elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, Research, and General News

Two faculty from Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters — Declan Kiberd and Dianne Pinderhughes — have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s oldest learned societies and independent policy research centers. They are among more than 200 members of the 239th AAAS class, which includes former first lady Michelle Obama, author Jonathan Franzen, gender theorist Judith Butler, former Indiana governor Mitch Daniels, NPR host Michel Martin, and neuro-oncologist Robert B. Darnell.

Read More

Political science and economics alumnus Carlos Lozada wins Pulitzer Prize

Author: Dennis Brown

Categories: Faculty News, Alumni, and General News

Notre Dame faculty member and alumnus Carlos Lozada, the nonfiction book critic for the Washington Post, is the recipient of a 2019 Pulitzer Prize for criticism, journalism’s highest honor. In announcing the award April 15, the Pulitzer jurors cited Lozada “for trenchant and searching reviews and essays that joined warm emotion and careful analysis in examining a broad range of books addressing government and the American experience.”

Read More

Arts and Letters graduates Jeremy Cappello Lee, Lily Falzon named 2019 Yenching Scholars

Author: Erin Blasko

Categories: Internationalism, Alumni, Research, Undergraduate News, General News, and National Fellowships

Arts and Letters graduates Jeremy Cappello Lee and Lily Falzon, both members of the class of 2018, have been invited to study at the Yenching Academy of Peking University in Beijing, China, as two of approximately 125 Yenching Scholars from across the globe. Established in 2014, the Yenching Academy offers a one-year master’s degree program for students with outstanding academic backgrounds and broad curiosity. The program pushes the study of China beyond the traditional boundaries of the humanities and social sciences.

Read More