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Spanish and Italian Ph.D. programs build strong reputations with dissertation-focused approach

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Graduate Students, Internationalism, and Research

From the beginning, there’s an end in sight. For students in Notre Dame’s new Ph.D. in Italian and Ph.D. in Spanish programs — each of which launched in 2016 — the focus is on ensuring students complete their dissertations and earn their degrees within five years. The programs are attracting high-caliber students from around the world, helping to strengthen a flourishing community of scholars that includes students in successful master’s of arts programs already operating in each area. 

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2 years, 35 students, $125,000 in funding: History seminar prepares undergraduates to do research around the world

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

In the past two years, 35 history majors in Paul Ocobock’s honors seminar have received more than $125,000 in funding to do original research around the world. And every student in his course who applied for funding received it — using the grants to explore archives in France, Ireland, Uganda, China, and South Korea, among other places. But to Ocobock, there is something even more important than his students’ 100 percent success rate in securing funding — the sense of community they develop as they plan their projects together, travel the globe to conduct research, then return to his classroom to begin work on their senior theses.

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Through history Ph.D. program, students develop innovative lines of research

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, and Research

Looking through new lenses, a Ph.D. candidate and two recent alumni of Notre Dame’s Ph.D. program in history have developed innovative lines of research that are adding depth to the topics of British imperialism, comparative colonialism, and human connections to animals. All three have obtained either tenure-track faculty positions or fellowships, and two finished their degrees in five years — a lofty goal set by the department and College of Arts and Letters and incentivized through the 5+1 Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

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Historian of modern European Catholicism joins Arts and Letters faculty

Author: Tom Coyne

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

An intellectual and cultural historian of modern Europe, Sarah Shortall joins the Department of History this fall as an assistant professor. She recently finished a junior research fellowship at Oxford University, is working on a book tentatively titled Soldiers of God in a Secular World: The Politics of Catholic Theology in Twentieth-Century France. The book examines the impact of Catholic theology on French politics after the separation of church and state in 1905, which she said is different from the separation of church and state in the United States.

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Notre Dame philosopher awarded National Humanities Center fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

Therese Cory, an associate professor of philosophy, has been awarded a Philip L. Quinn Fellowship by the National Humanities Center, a private institute of advanced study in North Carolina. Cory is one of 34 fellows chosen from among 630 applicants and the fourth Arts and Letters faculty member to receive an NHC fellowship since 2010. It will allow her to spend the year working on her book manuscript, Aquinas’s Metaphysics of Intellect: Being and Being-About.

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Researchers find sharp decline in poverty in the U.S. despite report from Census Bureau

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Research

This year’s report estimates poverty in the U.S. to be 12.7 percent for 2016, which is very close to the rate in 1980, suggesting little progress or change in the fight against poverty. However, the official poverty measure is flawed, according to James Sullivan, Rev. Thomas J. McDonagh, C.S.C., Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, and Bruce Meyer, McCormick Foundation Professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy.

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Video: Notre Dame's pre-health study abroad program in Puebla, Mexico

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

In Notre Dame International's study abroad program in Puebla, Mexico, students can enroll in a unique pre-medicine track, taking classes on health-related topics at the Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla. Participants in this track also shadow doctors twice per week in two Mexican public hospitals, learning about different specialties and gaining valuable clinical experience. They return with valuable language and cultural experience and a new perspective on health care, which they can apply to their future health professions at home or abroad.

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Notre Dame economist finds campaigns to reduce elective early-term births effective

Author: Brittany Collins Kaufman

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

A new study from researchers at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Central Florida shows that programs aimed at reducing early-term elective births have been successful, reducing the number of health complications in mothers and babies. Kasey Buckles, Brian and Jeannelle Brady Associate Professor of Economics at Notre Dame, and her co-author published the paper in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

 

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Corbett Family Hall: A dynamic mix of academics, community, and technology

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Alumni, Faculty News, General News, Graduate Students, Research, and Undergraduate News

Corbett Family Hall strikes a stunning silhouette rising above the east side of Notre Dame Stadium. But for the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology, it’s what’s on the inside that counts. Below the club seating, terraces, and press box on the building’s top three levels, faculty and students from these two social science departments will come together in the new 289,000-square-foot structure, made possible by a leadership gift from Notre Dame alumnus Richard Corbett. With classrooms, laboratories, and offices all under one massive roof, research and teaching efforts are united in a way that will bring untold benefits.

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Father Jenkins, Dean McGreevy reflect on 50th anniversary of Land O'Lakes Statement and the future of Catholic higher education

Author: Amanda Skofstad

Categories: Catholicism, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, and General News

In his opening remarks for “Land O’Lakes and Its Legacy,” on September 5, Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., suggested that among the essential activities of a university is to engage in discussion and debate about what its proper activities are. The examination included a lecture and panel discussion with four other Catholic university presidents in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the drafting and signing of the Land O’Lakes Statement. Arts and Letters Dean John T. McGreevy opened the event with a talk on the historical contexts of Land O’Lakes. He pointed to the impact of Vatican II, shifts in university and faculty governance, and a more global Church as essential backdrops for understanding the intentions of Land O’Lakes.

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Video: Chinese literature and culture professor Michel Hockx on censorship, China, and literary communities

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

“I'm interested in literature as product of a community and the way in which they decide what to include, what not to include, what is good, what is bad, how they choose to engage with censorship or not engage with censorship,” said Michel Hockx, professor of Chinese literature and culture in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures in the College of Arts and Letters and director of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies. Hockx has published works both in English and in Chinese on early 20th-century Chinese print culture as well as contemporary Internet culture in China.

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Spanish major hones language skills to prepare for career in medicine

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Research, and Undergraduate News

In summer 2016, Notre Dame senior Andrew Grose studied abroad in Spain — taking a headfirst dive into a language and culture he loved and had studied for years. The experience confirmed for him that whatever path he takes after graduation, Spanish will be a part of it. Grose, a Spanish and preprofessional studies major, is planning a career in medicine and knows his language skills will be a valuable asset — a fact that was underscored in a course on Latin America he took last fall.

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Mark Cummings receives lifetime achievement award from American Psychological Association

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Cummings, the William J. Shaw Center for Children and Families Professor of Psychology at Notre Dame, recently won the 2017 Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contribution to Developmental Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s developmental psychology section. Over the past 35 years, he has done extensive research to show that inter-parental relationships, father-child relationships, and other family relationships and processes are related to children’s short-term and long-term adjustment and well-being. With research projects in Northern Ireland, Colombia, Israel, Croatia, and Iran, he is also examining how political violence affects children's emotional security and development.

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Political science professor wins prestigious book award for research on women’s suffrage

Author: Emily McConville

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

In the nearly 100 years since women won the right to vote, a conventional wisdom about the aftermath of the 19th Amendment developed. Christina Wolbrecht believed that conventional wisdom needed to be challenged. In her book, the Notre Dame professor of political science and her co-author investigated and often upended long-held assumptions about women’s suffrage and offered new insight into the largest expansion of the electorate in American history. Their efforts earned them the American Political Science Association’s Victoria Schuck Award for the best book on women and politics published in the past year.

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