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Video: Meet Spanish Major Nick Nissen

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Internationalism, and Undergraduate News

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“The focus of your education should be on trying to open your doors to a more international understanding of the world, and I think the Spanish major does an amazing job in preparing us for that,” said Nick Nissen ’16, a Spanish major in the College of Arts and Letters. Studying Spanish at Notre Dame provides students with the skills needed to fully experience the Spanish-speaking world. Students learn the language while also studying literature and culture to better understand the historical and social contexts of the 400 million native Spanish speakers around the world.

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Three Questions with Political Science Associate Professor Christina Wolbrecht

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

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Christina Wolbrecht, associate professor of political science, C. Robert and Margaret Hanley Family Director of the Notre Dame Washington Program, and director of the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy at the University of Notre Dame, teaches and writes about American politics, political parties, women and politics, and American political development. Now at work on a study of the first 100 years of women as voters in American politics, she is co-author, with J. Kevin Corder, of the recently published book Counting Women’s Ballots: Female Voters from Suffrage through the New Deal.

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Historian Wins Phi Beta Kappa Award for Book on Philology

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Phi Beta Kappa

For his book pulling together the complex history of philology and how Western humanistic learning split into the modern humanities that we know today, Notre Dame historian James Turner has received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award. The honor is given for books in literary scholarship or criticism and is named for a distinguished Princeton University scholar, teacher, and dean. Turner’s book, Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities, looks at how learned researchers once included languages, history, and texts in a single broad field of study that came to be known as philology.

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Liberal Studies Professor and Medieval Institute Faculty Affiliate Wins Olivia Remie Constable Prize

Author: Megan J. Hall

Categories: General News

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Denis Robichaud, an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, has been awarded the 2016 Olivia Remie Constable Prize in Medieval Studies for study at the University of Oxford this summer. The prize was established last year by Robert M. Conway to honor Remie Constable, the former director of Notre Dame's Medieval Institute, and was held last summer by Kent Emery Jr., a professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, who completed work for an ongoing multi-person Duns Scotus edition. Robichaud studies 15th-century history and philosophy, and particularly Marsilio Ficino.

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Video: William Collins Donahue on the Resonance of Small Moments in Holocaust Literature

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

William Collins Donahue

“Early literary encounters with the Holocaust tended to tell you about the whole event, but now when the Holocaust appears, generally speaking, it appears in small moments, in kind of passing glances,” said William Collins Donahue, the John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities and chair of the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures at the University of Notre Dame. Donahue has researched extensively in the areas of literary realism and modernism, especially the work of Elias Canetti. Now focusing primarily on Holocaust literature, Donahue is developing an analogy for how the Holocaust appears in contemporary narratives. These small episodes, Donahue said, are similar to the Stolpersteine, a worldwide movement of small pavement stones, each commemorating a victim in the Holocaust.

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Video: Theology Professor Khaled Anatolios on Studying the Origins of Christian Doctrines

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Catholicism, Faculty News, General News, and Research

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“I tend to gravitate towards doctrines that seem inexplicable, and I try to understand what motivated the early Christians to formulate these doctrines in just these ways,” said Khaled Anatolios, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. Anatolios specializes in the theology of the early Church. As a Byzantine Catholic priest, he has a special interest in the doctrines of the Greek fathers as well as complementary ideas between the Eastern and Western traditions. His current research focuses on the doctrine of salvation, particularly the disconnect between classical sources and modern experience.

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Seven Arts and Letters Students Awarded Graduate Fellowships from National Science Foundation

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Graduate Students, National Fellowships, Research, and Undergraduate News

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Seven students in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have been awarded graduate fellowships from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for 2016. Another six have been recognized with honorable mentions. The NSF’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) honors and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based degrees in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and social science disciplines. The award provides a stipend, tuition support, and research funds for three years.

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Theology, Arts and Letters Pre-Health Major Wins Greenspan Student Voice of Mental Health Award

Author: Ann Hastings

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Maggie Skoch

Maggie Skoch, a 2016 graduate of the University of Notre Dame, was recognized as this year’s Jerry Greenspan Student Voice of Mental Health Award recipient at The Jed Foundation’s annual gala in New York City on June 7. The prestigious annual award honors a student who has reduced prejudice around mental illness, raised awareness of mental health issues on campus, and encouraged help-seeking among their peers. Skoch, an Arts and Letters pre-health and theology graduate from Mentor, Ohio, will attend the Stritch School of Medicine at Loyola University in Chicago to pursue a career in psychiatry.

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Video: Theology Professor Robin Jensen on Understanding Early Christian Art and Architecture

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: Faculty News, General News, and Research

Robin Jensen

“It’s my conviction that the best way to know about how early Christians worshipped — even what they believed — is to try to get as much information as we can about where they lived and what they saw, not just what they wrote and what they read,” said Robin Jensen, the Patrick O’Brien Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. Jensen researches topics at the intersections of Christian art, architecture, liturgy, and theology. Her forthcoming book examines the history of the cross from a variety of liturgical and social perspectives, both in ancient times and in contemporary culture.

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Video: Political Science Major and Glynn Scholar Delivers 2016 Valedictory Address

Author: Notre Dame News

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Abby Davis

Abby Davis, a political science major from Avon Lake, Ohio, was named valedictorian of the 2016 University of Notre Dame graduating class and gave the valedictory address during the 171st University Commencement Ceremony on May 15 at Notre Dame Stadium. See the video or read the transcript of her speech here.

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