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Video: Medieval studies major illustrates the story of Charlemagne's elephant

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

When honors medieval studies major Karen Neis ’16 took a class on Charlemagne, the unusual story of the emperor’s prized elephant resonated with her. She recalled that story when it came time to choose a senior thesis, ultimately leading her to produce an illustrated children’s book, Abul Abbas, The Elephant. The book recounts the journey of the elephant a caliph gave as a gift to Charlemagne around the year 800. In the story, a Christian, a Jew, and a Muslim all work together to transport the elephant 3,000 miles from Baghdad to Aachen.

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Video: Professor David Campbell on political involvement and civic engagement

Author: Todd Boruff

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

David Campbell is the Packey J. Dee Professor of American Democracy and chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include American politics, civic engagement, political behavior, religion and politics, and education policy. In this video, he discusses his research on why people do—or, increasingly do not—get involved in politics.

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Romance languages and literatures associate professor receives Sheedy Award

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Marisel Moreno, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, has been selected to receive the 2016 Sheedy Excellence in Teaching Award, the highest teaching honor in the College of Arts and Letters. Moreno, whose research and teaching focus on Latino literature and culture, helped launch a community-based learning program in her department in 2010. Students in her classes enhance traditional literature study by volunteering at La Casa de Amistad, a local Latino community organization.

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French professor to write a ‘capitalist’ history of literature with support from NEH fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

French literature has received a lot of attention lately from an unexpected source—economists. Julia Douthwaite, a professor of French in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, wants to evaluate their interpretations and delve deeper into literary representations of money. Douthwaite has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities—her second—for her book project on the topic, tentatively titled Financiers We Have Known: A Capitalist History of Literature.

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English graduate student wins Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

César Soto wants to know how the spark of political revolution can transform religious concepts of community and inclusion. To better understand the issue, he’s turning to the literature of England, Ireland, and Mexico in the late 1700s and early 1800s. Soto, a Ph.D. candidate in Notre Dame’s Department of English with a graduate minor in Irish studies, has been awarded a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for 2016-17 to support his project.

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Two Arts and Letters graduate students awarded Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

Author: Carrie Gates

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, and Centers and Institutes

Graduate students Filippo Gianferrari and Adriana Monica Solomon have been awarded Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships to delve deeper into the lives and impact of two intellectual archetypes—Dante and Isaac Newton, respectively. Gianferrari, a Ph.D. candidate in the Medieval Institute, is investigating the Latin authors who may have influenced Dante. And Solomon, a philosophy Ph.D. candidate in the History and Philosophy of Science Program at the John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, is shining a light on Newton’s lesser-known contributions to philosophy and science.

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Hope and Optimism project funds philosophical research, awards playwrights and video producers

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

An interdisciplinary research collaboration between the University of Notre Dame and Cornell University has awarded more than $344,000 to seven projects in the final year of the program that explores the theoretical, empirical, and practical dimensions of hope and optimism, as well as related states such as pessimism, anxiety, and despair. The project, Hope and Optimism: Conceptual and Empirical Investigations, also announced the winners of its Hope on Stage and Hope on Screen contests, which challenged artists to create both original plays and original films that explored the concept of hope.

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Notre Dame to host academic conference on Pope Francis in Cuba

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies will convene a gathering of theologians and other scholars in Havana Oct. 16-18 to discuss the impact of Pope Francis’ visits to Latin America and the United States. The colloquium, to be held in the Casa Sacerdotal (Priests’ House) of the Archdiocese of Havana, will include participants from throughout Latin America and the United States — among them, a group of Notre Dame undergraduate students enrolled in one of the institute’s theology courses.

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1916 The Irish Rebellion awarded 'Best Documentary Series'

Author: Mary Hendriksen

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

1916 The Irish Rebellion was awarded "Best Documentary Series" at the 2016 Irish Film and Television Award ceremony, held on Friday, Oct. 7, in Dublin. Narrated by Liam Neeson, the three-part series tells the dramatic story of the events that took place in Dublin during Easter Week 1916, when a small group of Irish rebels took on the might of the British Empire.

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Notre Dame launches new Ph.D. programs in Italian and Spanish

Author: Josh Weinhold

Categories: Graduate Students, General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters has launched two rigorous new doctoral programs in Italian and Spanish designed to train world-class literary scholars in the languages and literatures of Italy, the Iberian Peninsula, and Latin America. As the first new graduate degrees formed since the creation of the College’s innovative 5+1 Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, the curriculum and structure has been designed to incentivize and facilitate timely degree completion.

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Notre Dame student documentarians reveal to audiences how others see the world

Author: Tom Lange

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Alumni, and Arts

A documentary by two Notre Dame student filmmakers has been featured in 12 film festivals across the country and won numerous awards. It's the latest success story for documentarians from Notre Dame, a line that extends from How to Die in Oregon director Peter Richardson to The Great Alone’s Greg Kohs to Wordplay director Patrick Creadon. That tradition of excellence extends to 2015 graduate Dylan Parent, whose short documentary on a Holocaust survivor screened at the St. Louis International Film Festival, and Erin Zacek ’11 and Dan Moore ’11, whose film was chosen for the 2011 Los Angeles Film Festival.

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Historian Ted Beatty wins 2016 AHA Friedrich Katz Prize

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Edward “Ted” Beatty, professor of history, associate dean for academic affairs at the Keough School of Global Affairs, and faculty fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, has been selected as the winner of the 2016 Friedrich Katz Prize for his book Technology and the Search for Progress in Modern Mexico (University of California Press, 2015). The Katz Prize is awarded annually by the American Historical Association (AHA) to honor the best book in Latin American and Caribbean history.

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Notre Dame launches Latino Studies Scholars Program

Author: Shannon Rooney

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Centers and Institutes

Notre Dame announces the launch of the Latino Studies Scholars Program (LSSP). The merit-based scholarship and accompanying curriculum for undergraduate students is designed to attract and shape leaders working to support and empower Latino communities. The scholarship was created by the University’s Institute for Latino Studies (ILS) as part of its mission to advance the understanding of the fastest growing and youngest population in the United States and the Catholic Church.

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Program of Liberal Studies associate professor wins fellowship to further research on Renaissance intellectual

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Robert Goulding, an associate professor in Notre Dame’s Program of Liberal Studies and the History and Philosophy of Science program, has won a yearlong fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, where he will finish a book on Renaissance thinker Thomas Harriot. About 200 scholars from around the world are chosen each year to work with 28 permanent faculty at the IAS.

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Theology major Jake Grefenstette ’16 spending year in Beijing through prestigious Yenching Scholar program

Author: Megan Valley

Categories: National Fellowships, General News, Undergraduate News, and Internationalism

Notre Dame theology major John “Jake” Grefenstette ’16 has been named a Yenching Scholar at Peking University in Beijing. The globally competitive award provides Grefenstette with a full scholarship and stipend to pursue an interdisciplinary master’s degree in China studies. He is one of just 125 students—from 40 countries and more than 80 universities worldwide—to join the second cohort of Yenching Scholars.

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