Latest News

Latest News » Archives » 2012

Russian Scholar Alyssa Gillespie Wins Translation Award

Author: Chris Milazzo

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Notre Dame Associate Professor Alyssa Gillespie’s elegant translation of “Two Trees Desire to Come Together…” by Marina Tsvetaeva was recently awarded joint third place in the 2011 Joseph Brodsky–Stephen Spender Prize competition. This recognition comes just a few months after Gillespie, co-director of the University’s program in Russian and East European studies, won second prize in the 2011 Compass Awards, another international poetry translation contest.

Read More

Notre Dame Research Team Featured in Launch of Latin American/Latino Digital Archive Project

A research team based at the Julian Samora Library in the College of Arts and Letters’ Institute for Latino Studies (ILS) is one of three hemispheric teams to have its work featured in the launch of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston’s (MFAH) digital archive, which was formally released to the public during an international symposium held January 19–20 in Houston.

Read More

For Top Irish Language Tweeter, It’s #lovetostudyIrish

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Internationalism

University of Notre Dame senior Brian Boll has changed his major several times: First it was anthropology, then English, then philosophy, followed by medieval studies. “I always was, and still am, interested in too many things, but there’s one interest that’s always seemed to get the upper hand: language, languages and their study.” Specifically, study of the Irish language.

Read More

Shakespeare at Notre Dame Presents SonnetFest 2012

Author: Chuck Gessert

Categories: General News and Arts

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with the third annual “SonnetFest.” All 154 of William Shakespeare’s sonnets will be read sequentially from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, February 14 in the Great Hall of O’Shaughnessy at the University of Notre Dame. The event, sponsored by Shakespeare at Notre Dame and the College of Arts and Letters, is free and open to the public.

Read More

Political Scientist Michael Zuckert Wins Lifetime Achievement Award

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News and Faculty News

University of Notre Dame political scientist Michael Zuckert has been awarded the 2011 Jack Miller Center (JMC) Chairman’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Academic Excellence. According to the prize committee, the honor recognizes Zuckert’s scholarship as well as “his extraordinary ability as a classroom teacher who has provided generations of undergraduates and graduate students a profound understanding of our constitutional heritage.”

Read More

Film Festival Showcases Students' Projects

Author: Rachel Hamilton

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Alumni, and Arts

One weekend last month, members of the Notre Dame community sat down to watch 16 films, ranging from comedies to dramas and documentaries, in one evening. But these movies weren’t made in Hollywood. That’s because the 23rd annual Student Film Festival showcased the work of many students in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre.

Read More

Political Scientist Daniel Philpott Begins Research on Forgiveness in Uganda

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

What role, if any, does forgiveness play in the context of war, in the wake of unspeakable atrocities? Daniel Philpott, associate professor of political science and peace studies, recently returned from Uganda, where he is exploring the practice of forgiveness among survivors of the two-decades-long civil war between the Lord’s Resistance Army and the Ugandan government.

Read More

Psychologist Mark Cummings Studies How Political Violence Impacts Children

Author: Sarah Hutcheon and Susan Guibert

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Political violence and the aftermath of war are known to be harmful to children’s and teens’ mental health and well-being, but until now, few studies have examined how this happens. A new longitudinal study of neighborhoods in Belfast, Northern Ireland, led by University of Notre Dame Psychology Professor Mark Cummings, has found political violence affects children by upsetting the ways their families function, resulting in behavior problems and mental health symptoms among the youths over extended periods of time.

Read More

Economist Kirk Doran Shows How Communism's Collapse Changed Mathematics in the U.S.

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1992 brought an influx of Soviet mathematicians to U.S. institutions, and those scholars’ differing areas of specialization have changed the way math is studied and taught in this country, according to new research by University of Notre Dame Economist Kirk Doran and George Borjas from Harvard University.

Read More

Psychologist Cindy Bergeman Studies Aging and Resiliency

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

In an early job as a social worker for senior citizens, Cindy Bergeman began to wonder: Why did some of the people she worked with have such a positive attitude while others seemed so dreary? When faced with adversity or stress, why did some weather the storm better than others? Bergeman, now a professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Psychology, has spent more than two decades pursuing the answers to those questions.

Read More

Historian Brad Gregory's New Book Explores "The Unintended Reformation"

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

How did our world come to be as it is? Examining why and how the West was propelled into its current pluralism and polarization over the long term, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society (Harvard University Press, 2012), offers new insight into how life in North America and Europe has been shaped over the past five centuries by the Protestant Reformation. Author Brad Gregory, University of Notre Dame historian, traces the relationships among religion, science, politics, morality, capitalism and consumerism, and higher education from the Middle Ages through the Reformation era to the present.

Read More

Molly Kinder to Receive Kroc Institute 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: General News, Alumni, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Molly Kinder ‘01, who majored in political science and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame, will receive the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Kinder, a native of Buffalo, New York, is director of special programs for Development Innovation Ventures in Washington, D.C., a new initiative at the United States Agency for International Development that funds groundbreaking approaches to global development challenges.

Read More

Department of Music to Celebrate Works of Franz Schubert

Author: Alex Kilpatrick

Categories: General News and Arts

The University of Notre Dame’s Department of Music will celebrate Franz Schubert’s 215th birthday on Friday, February 3, with an afternoon of music by the famed Austrian composer. The event, called Schubertiade, will take place from 12:30 to 5 p.m. in the O’Shaughnessy Great Hall and features performances from faculty and students, as well as readings chosen by J.W. Van Gorkom Professor of Music Susan Youens, an expert on Schubert’s work.

Read More

Theologian and Historian Timothy Matovina Discusses Electoral Effect of Latino Vote

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

According to University of Notre Dame theologian and historian Timothy Matovina, “bold proclamations about Latino voters determining presidential elections have become a regular feature of political commentary.” Matovina, professor of theology and director of Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, is the author of a recent history titled Latino Catholicism: Transformation in America’s Largest Church. “In fact,” he says, “the electoral significance of Latinos is growing steadily, but not as exponentially as such commentaries suggest.”

Read More

Graduate Student Earns Accolades for Research on Cancer Survivors

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News, Research, and Alumni

Post-doctoral fellow Errol Philip made history this fall when he became the first two-time winner of a prestigious American Psychological Association graduate student award—just the latest in a long list of accolades. Philip won the APA’s Division 17 Health Psychology Graduate Student Award for his paper, “Depression and Cancer Survivorship: Prevalence Rates and the Importance of Coping Self-Efficacy in a Sample of Long-Term Survivors." He won the award in 2008 for a paper on quality of life in cancer patients.

Read More

Senior Nicole Shea Researches Autism Therapy

Author: Chris Milazzo

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Research

Senior Nicole Shea’s love for psychology began in a pool. “In high school, I worked with children with disabilities by teaching them swim lessons,” Shea says, adding that her desire to find ways to help such children only intensified during her first psychology courses at the University of Notre Dame. “I was just drawn to it.” Shea started working in the Department of Psychology’s labs even before she declared her major, and she has already contributed to a published paper and conference poster.

Read More

Economics Alumna Focuses on Health Policy

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, and Alumni

When she first arrived at the University of Notre Dame, Karen Stockley ’08 had no plan to major in economics and says graduate school wasn’t on her radar either. Today, she is pursuing a Ph.D. in economics at Harvard University and already has three years of professional research experience, an award-winning paper to her credit, and a bright future in healthcare economics. It was a Principles of Economics class during her very first semester, Stockley says, that sparked her interest in the field.

Read More

Mark Roche Honored for Why Choose the Liberal Arts?

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Former Notre Dame College of Arts and Letters Dean Mark Roche has been named winner of the 2012 Frederic W. Ness Book Award from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). The Ness award is given annually to the book that best illuminates the goals and practices of a contemporary liberal education. Roche’s winning book, Why Choose the Liberal Arts? (University of Notre Dame Press, 2010), “outlines the benefits of a liberal education for all students striving for success in today’s tough economy,” says Pomona College President David W. Oxtoby, the Ness Book Award committee chair.

Read More

Quantitative Psychology Professors Honored

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Three University of Notre Dame psychologists have been recognized for their work to more precisely measure a wide range of research topics, from happiness and depression to educational achievement. Specialists in the demanding subfield of quantitative psychology, Scott Maxwell, Zahng Guangjian, and Ying “Alison” Cheng design the statistical scaffolding needed to support measurable research into what are some of the most ephemeral of human conditions and concepts.

Read More

Notre Dame Professor Honored for Environmental-Justice Work

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Alumni, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

By now, most people are aware of the environmental effects of air or water pollution; University of Notre Dame philosopher and scientist Kristin Shrader-Frechette has devoted herself to bringing to light a less known concern, the inequitable distribution of pollution’s human toll. “Polluters ‘target’ poor and minority communities to locate noxious facilities because they know that residents often are unable to defend themselves,” she says. For her efforts, Shrader-Frechette was recently awarded the Dr. Jean Mayer Global Citizenship Award from Tufts University’s Institute for Global Leadership.

Read More

Bernoulli Award Winners Employ Skills Beyond Graduation

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, and Alumni

Economics majors in the University of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters develop the analytical skills and social perspective needed to better understand complex economic forces at work in the world. They also hone the ability to express their ideas and insights both clearly and concisely. That’s exactly what Class of 2011 students Elizabeth Koerbel and Matthew Conti demonstrated in their senior theses, which won first and second place, respectively, in the University’s annual Bernoulli Awards competition.

Read More

Notre Dame Intensifies Focus on Constitutional Studies

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News and Faculty News

The study of constitutions dates back to Aristotle, yet remains as relevant today as it was then. “It’s a perennial subject that I think is getting renewed attention, first with the fall of the Soviet Union and the constitution writing that went on with that, then the democratization movement in Latin America, and now the revolutions in the Arab world,” says Vincent Phillip Muñoz, Tocqueville Associate Professor of Religion and Public Life at the University of Notre Dame.

Read More

Economist Daniel Hungerman Tests Assumptions About Faith

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

By many different measures, people who take religion seriously are different from the rest of society, says University of Notre Dame economist Daniel Hungerman. And different in a good way. “In fact, religiosity is the best predictor of any number of positive social outcomes,” he says. “Religious people are generally healthier, they give more to charities, they are much more likely to be involved in civic life, and they are much less likely to suffer from depression or mental illness.”

Read More