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Ted Mandell: From Classroom to Stadium to Third World

Author: Mike Danahey

Categories: General News, Alumni, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

As a documentary filmmaker, a faculty member in College of Arts and Letters’ Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT), and a producer for Fighting Irish Digital Media, Ted Mandell ’86 quite literally sheds light on the University of Notre Dame’s traditions of social justice and student athletics. What unites his approach to these roles, says Mandell, is a commitment to show the human side of every story—and help his students learn to do the same.

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Senior Film Student Wins Princess Grace Award

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, and Arts

When Kathleen Bracke got the call, she dropped the phone out of shock, then picked it up and asked the caller to repeat the news. On the other end was a representative of the Princess Grace Foundation-USA announcing that Bracke had won a 2012 Princess Grace Award. Bracke, a senior in the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) is one of only two winners of this year’s Princess Grace Undergraduate Film Scholarship.

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Sacred Music at Notre Dame Hosts Inaugural Conference

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Catholicism, Arts, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s inaugural Sacred Music Conference will be held Thursday through Saturday (September 13 through 15). The conference will feature sacred music from the Renaissance to the present day and will bring together composers, scholars, and conductors of sacred music to discuss, share, and perform their work. Several concert events are open to the public and free of charge.

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Service Work Lands Notre Dame Senior on Magazine Cover

Author: Claire Stephens

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

Lindsay Brown, a University of Notre Dame senior majoring in political science, has won Seventeen magazine’s“Pretty Amazing”contest, which celebrates young women who have done something exceptional. Brown was recognized for her service work with girls in Nepal and other countries, her involvement in the nonprofit organization“She’s the First,”and the creation of her own nonprofit project. As the contest winner, Brown received a $20,000 scholarship and will be featured on the cover of the October issue of Seventeen ."

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Essaka Joshua Honored by Society for Disability Studies

Author: Mike Danahey

Categories: General News and Faculty News

The Society for Disability Studies recently presented its Tyler Rigg Award to Essaka Joshua, a teaching professor in Notre Dame’s Department of English and the Joseph Morahan Director of the College Seminar program in the University’s College of Arts and Letters. Joshua received the accolade—given annually to the best paper in literature and literary analysis published in Disability Studies Quarterly—for “The Drifting Language of Architectural Accessibility in Victor Hugo’s Notre-Dame de Paris.”

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New Book Celebrates Notre Dame’s Campus Chapels

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News and Catholicism

The Chapels of Notre Dame, by Lawrence S. Cunningham, John A. O’Brien Professor of Theology, and Matt Cashore, senior university photographer at the University of Notre Dame, has been published by University of Notre Dame Press. The book features a collection of some 200 full-color photographs taken by Cashore interspersed with Cunningham’s commentary on the theological, artistic, architectural, and historic dimensions of the 57 chapels embedded throughout Notre Dame’s campus.

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ICeNSA Network Opens Flow of Ideas, Collaboration

Author: Gene Stowe

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

The University of Notre Dame’s Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications (iCeNSA), is a connector and a hub whose interdisciplinary work and faculty affiliates span computing, science, engineering, mathematics, social science, and humanities. Nitesh Chawla of computer science and engineering is director of the center, with co-directors Michael Ferdig of biological sciences, David Hachen of sociology and Zoltán Toroczkai of physics. The multidisciplinary approach, reaching into education and service as well as research and science, puts iCeNSA on the leading edge of an accelerating trend in universities and other enterprises.

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Jaimie Bleck Wins Award for Best Dissertation in African Politics

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

University of Notre Dame political scientist Jaimie Bleck has won the 2011 Lynne Rienner Award for Best Dissertation in African Politics from the American Political Science Association’s Africa Politics Conference Group (APCG). Bleck’s award-winning work, “Schooling Citizens: Education, Citizenship, and Democracy in Mali,” explores the political effect of education in the West African country.

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Theologians Publish New Book on Eucharist

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Catholicism, and Faculty News

The Eucharistic Liturgies: Their Evolution and Interpretation, by University of Notre Dame theology professors Paul F. Bradshaw and Maxwell E. Johnson, has recently been published by Liturgical Press of Collegeville, Minn. The book concerns the historical development of the theology and liturgy of the Church’s most important prayer, from the early Christian communal meals to the diverse Eucharistic liturgies of Eastern and Western Christians.

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Fathers Biologically Attuned to Their Children When Sleeping Nearby, Research Reveals

Categories: General News, Research, Alumni, and Faculty News

Mothers aren’t the only ones who are biologically adapted to respond to children. New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that dads who sleep near their children experience a drop in testosterone. Previous research from humans and other species suggests this decrease might make men more responsive to their children’s needs and help them focus on the demands of parenthood. In a recent study, Notre Dame Anthropologist Lee Gettler shows that close sleep proximity between fathers and their children (on the same sleeping surface) results in lower testosterone compared to fathers who sleep alone.

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Notre Dame Forum Events to Explore Future of American Democracy

Categories: General News and Faculty News

The 2012-13 Notre Dame Forum, “A More Perfect Union: The Future of America’s Democracy,” will present a series of events throughout the academic year that will explore profound questions about the state of the U.S. political system and its capacity to deal with the rapidly changing domestic and international challenges it faces.

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History Major Plus Internship a Powerful Combination

Author: Chris Milazzo

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

Think about the study of history, and you might conjure images of dusty books and timelines. But Notre Dame history majors John Karol and Christine Affleck, both Class of 2012, and senior Jordyn Smith demonstrate how the versatile skills they developed in the College of Arts and Letters can be applied to a wide array of challenging internships and career paths.

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New Book Proposes Reconciliation as Path to Peace

Author: Renée LaReau

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

A new book by political scientist and peace studies scholar Daniel Philpott makes the case for forgiveness and reconciliation as a way to achieve justice and lasting peace after violent conflict. Just and Unjust Peace: An Ethic of Political Reconciliation, recently released by Oxford University Press, explores the concept of reconciliation, which is deeply rooted in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, as well as in the secular restorative justice movement.

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On the Path to the Foreign Service

Author: Mary Kate Malone

Categories: General News, Alumni, Centers and Institutes, and Internationalism

While working as a national sales planner at Univision Television Group in 2009, Melissa Fisher ’07 began to feel restless. She wasn’t sure what direction to take next but knew she had to think more about what she wanted to do with her life, even if that meant taking a leap into the unknown. And so that’s exactly what she did: She quit her job and bought a one-way ticket to Cambodia. “I wanted to challenge myself and live in a developing country where I didn’t know the language,” says the former political science and Spanish double major. “I felt like I needed to do something challenging, to grow up and be on my own.”

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New Faculty Propel Economics Department’s Rise

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Faculty News

Timothy Fuerst, one of the most-cited economists in the world, is joining the University of Notre Dame this fall as William J. and Dorothy K. O’Neill Professor of Economics. Fuerst’s appointment is the “crown jewel” in a series of recent hires that will bring even greater depth and diversity to the rapidly growing Department of Economics, says Chair Richard Jensen, the Gilbert F. Schaefer Professor of Economics.

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Preeminent New Testament Scholar Comes to Notre Dame

Author: Sara Burnett

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Professor John T. Fitzgerald, an award-winning teacher, will join the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Theology this fall, says J. Matthew Ashley, associate professor and department chair. “He is not only a preeminent scholar of the New Testament in itself but also has a broad and penetrating knowledge of the Greco-Roman context in which it was written and received,” Ashley says.

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Revisiting America’s Revolutionary Myths and Realities

Author: Kevin Clarke

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Most Americans are comfortable fixing a date (July 4) and an event (the signing of the Declaration of Independence) to a definitive moment when the United States separated itself from its colonial parent, Great Britain. But for University of Notre Dame historian Patrick Griffin, the revolution is better understood as a process—not an event.

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Political Scientist Geoffrey Layman Wins APSA Article Award

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Geoffrey Layman, professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science, has won the 2012 Jack Walker Outstanding Article Award for “Activists and Conflict Extension in American Party Politics,” published by the American Political Science Review in 2010. Bestowed by the Political Organizations and Parties section of the American Political Science Association (APSA), the award recognizes an article published within the past two years that has made a significant contribution to research and scholarship on political organizations and parties.

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Alumna Honored for Redesign of Breast Cancer Procedure

Author: Mike Danahey

Categories: General News, Research, Alumni, and Arts

With her graduate thesis project, University of Notre Dame alumna Charlotte Lux, M.F.A. ’11, set out to redesign a stressful diagnostic procedure women who might have breast cancer undergo in the hopes of making it less traumatic. The resulting design has earned Lux recognition in the 2012 Core77 Design Awards, where she was named student winner in the strategy and research category.

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Study Shows Official Measures of American Poverty Off-Base

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

The U.S. Census Bureau’s method of calculating who is poor and who is not has been under fire by researchers for years because it doesn’t calculate the benefits of anti-poverty programs—such as food stamps and housing subsidies—into its formula. In response to the criticism, the Census Bureau released in the fall of 2011 the Supplemental Poverty Measure to more accurately assess poverty in America. Though the new supplemental measure uses a definition of income that is conceptually closer to resources available for consumption than pretax money income, a new study by University of Notre Dame economist James X. Sullivan finds that even the Supplementary Poverty Measure provides an inaccurate reflection of deprivation in this country.

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Study: Telling Fewer Lies Linked to Better Health and Relationships

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

“Pants on fire” isn’t the only problem liars face. New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that when people managed to reduce their lies in given weeks across a 10-week study, they reported significantly improved physical and mental health in those same weeks. The “Science of Honesty” study was presented recently at the American Psychological Association’s 120th annual convention.

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Industrial Design Student Among Top Five in Nation

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

Notre Dame’s Ryan Geraghty ’12 has been named one of the top five graduating industrial design students in the nation, and his work will be featured at the Industrial Designers Society of America’s (IDSA) International conference in Boston August 15-18. Geraghty earned this opportunity by winning first place at the IDSA’s Midwest District competition in April. “For students, this is the highest honor they can receive within our profession and within our professional society,” says Assistant Professor Ann-Marie Conrado, “so that’s something that goes down in the record books.” Another record for the books: Geraghty was the fifth Notre Dame student in six years to take the title.

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Did Obama Break Mold of Dems as 'War Wimps'?

Categories: General News and Faculty News

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is banking on the traditional Republican advantage in defense to help him defeat Democratic President Barack Obama this November. This Republican strategy of painting Democrats as soft on defense has a long pedigree in American politics. It certainly seems to have worked in the past. But will it still? “In my view, Romney shouldn’t bet on it this time,” says University of Notre Dame Political Science Professor Michael Desch, who specializes in foreign and national defense policies.

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Political Scientist Monika Nalepa Wins Leon D. Epstein Book Prize

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Notre Dame assistant professor Monika Nalepa has won the American Political Science Association’s 2012 Leon D. Epstein prize for Skeletons in the Closet: Transitional Justice in Post-Communist Europe (Cambridge University Press). This is the second win in two years for Nalepa. Skeletons in the Closet also won the 2011 Best Book Award from the APSA’s Comparative Democratization section.

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