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Political Science Major Makes Mark at Summer Institute

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Research

Hours of class each day and frenzied paper writing into the early dawn hours is practically a Notre Dame tradition during finals weeks in December and May. Less so in the middle of July, but this is exactly what senior political science major Angel Mira found himself doing this past summer. Mira was one of just 20 students nationwide accepted into the American Political Science Association’s Ralph Bunche Summer Institute.

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Cities in the Desert: Anthropologist Rahul Oka Studies Trade in African Refugee Camps

Author: Carol C. Bradley

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Rahul Oka, Ford Family Assistant Professor of anthropology at Notre Dame, has conducted five seasons of ethnographic research in the 90,000-person Kakuma Refugee Camp, in the Turkana District in northwest Kenya, where refugees from war—from southern Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Congo and Uganda—co-exist.

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Arts and Letters Alumnus Wins Prestigious Award for Work With Homeless

Author: Megan Zagger

Categories: General News and Alumni

James O’Connell, M.D., a 1970 University of Notre Dame College of Arts and Letters graduate and founder and president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, was recently awarded the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism. Presented by The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship, this prestigious award recognizes O’Connell for his advocacy and direct service to people experiencing homelessness. The Schweitzer Prize is given to an individual whose life example has significantly improved the health of people in the United States or abroad, and whose commitment to service influences and inspires others.

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A Memorable Reacquaintance in Rome: Pope Presents Prize to Notre Dame Theologian

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, Catholicism, and Faculty News

Some 40 years ago, Rev. Brian E. Daley, S.J., Catherine F. Huisking Professor of Theology, then a doctoral student at Oxford, met Rev. Joseph A. Ratzinger, then a professor of theology at the University of Regensburg, at an academic conference in Germany. Whether or not Pope Benedict XVI remembers their first meeting, Father Daley won’t soon forget their second. On Oct. 20, at a ceremony at the Vatican, Pope Benedict presented Father Daley with a 2012 Ratzinger Prize for Theology.

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Notre Dame Offers New Study Abroad Program in Paris

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, and Internationalism

Paris, the legendary City of Lights, is the newest destination for University of Notre Dame College of Arts and Letters students who want to study abroad. “We are delighted to offer this new opportunity beginning in 2013-14,” says Julia Douthwaite, a professor of French in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. “The new exchange program at the Université Paris Diderot will expand existing offerings by allowing advanced students in the humanities to enroll directly in courses with French students at one of the youngest and most dynamic universities in Paris.”

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Discussion to Celebrate 40th Anniversary of Coeducation at Notre Dame

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Catholicism, and Faculty News

The 40th anniversary of coeducation at the University of Notre Dame will be celebrated in a panel discussion, Paving the Way: Reflections on the Early Years of Coeducation at Notre Dame, at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 8 in the auditorium of the Eck Visitors Center. The discussion, sponsored by Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism with the Department of American Studies, the Gender Studies Program and Badin Hall, will include five people who experienced and shaped Notre Dame’s transition from an exclusively male to coeducational institution.

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Liturgical Manuscript From Beethoven Raises Questions, Expert Says

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Categories: General News, Catholicism, Arts, and Faculty News

The recent discovery of a previously unknown musical manuscript by Ludwig van Beethoven provides a glimpse of the composer at work on a medieval hymn he would already have known quite well, according to Peter Jeffrey, Michael P. Grace Professor of Medieval Studies in the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Music. Beethoven’s manuscript was an arrangement of the Gregorian chant “Pange Lingua,” a hymn often sung in Catholic liturgies during Holy Week.

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Professor Kasey Buckles Brings Economics Home

Author: Aaron Smith

Categories: General News, Research, and Faculty News

Kasey Buckles, an assistant professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Economics, challenges undergraduates to take the theories, statistics, and modeling tools they learn in their core courses and apply them to universal life experiences like birth, marriage, divorce, and other family dynamics. In her research-focused seminar called Economics of the Family, Buckles and her students explore questions such as “What is the effect of birth order on prenatal investment in children?” and “How does a mother’s age at first birth affect the academic achievement of her children?”

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First-Year English Course Leads to Writing Career

Author: Mary Kate Malone

Categories: General News and Alumni

In the fall of her first year at Notre Dame, Stephanie Fitzhugh ‘91 sat nervously at her desk in an O’Shaughnessy Hall classroom, awaiting the start of her Composition and Literature class. Fitzhugh, who always excelled in math and science, felt uneasy taking a course focused on subjects that usually gave her trouble: literature and writing.

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Video: Fighting For a More Generous World

Author: Arts and Letters

Categories: General News, Research, Centers and Institutes, and Faculty News

Exploring an essential human virtue. Whether it’s the gift of time, money, or a helping hand, everyone has the capacity to transform someone else’s life. But, in a world where millions struggle to put food on the table, millions more struggle either to keep their jobs or to find jobs that pay a living wage, and millions still struggle with either preventable or treatable diseases, why do some people give so much and others so little? The University of Notre Dame’s Science of Generosity initiative is leading an international effort to uncover the causes, manifestations, and consequences of generosity.

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FTT Students Granted Exclusive Right to Make Cannes Documentary

Author: Kate Cohorst

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Internationalism, and Arts

Networking with industry insiders, watching highly anticipated films, walking the red carpet, and seeing stars was all part of the job for a group of University of Notre Dame students who jetted off to the 2012 Cannes International Film Festival this summer. Working with Assistant Professor Aaron Magnan-Park, the students from the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) were granted the exclusive right to make a documentary about the internship program at the festival’s American Pavilion—an opportunity that provided a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the premier event in international film.

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Political Scientist Continues Research in Post-Doc at Brown

Author: Mike Danahey

Categories: General News and Alumni

The European Union received the Nobel Peace Prize—despite current economic woes and social unrest—for transforming most of Europe from “a continent of war to a continent of peace.” But political scientist Joshua Bandoch, who received his Ph.D. at Notre Dame this year and is now a post-doctoral fellow at Brown University, argues that the 27-member-nation European Union is trying to form too close of a union. “This is problematic because the diverse peoples of this union are more different than their leaders seem to want to acknowledge.”

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New Book Illuminates Sierra Leonean War and the Role of Love

Author: Joan Fallon

Categories: General News, Research, and Internationalism

When Catherine Bolten first considered studying the city of Makeni in Sierra Leone, many people—government officials, professors, the U.S. ambassador—warned her to stay away. It’s a dangerous and immoral place, they told her, infamous because residents refused to fight the rebels who occupied Makeni for three years (1998-2002) during the decade-long civil war.

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Varieties of Democracy Project Awarded European Commission Funding

Author: Elizabeth Rankin

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

The Varieties of Democracy project (V-Dem), an ambitious international research collaboration based at Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute for International Studies, has been awarded €475,000 (about $616,500) in research support from the European Commission. Led by Notre Dame political scientist Michael Coppedge, Staffan Lindberg of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and John Gerring of Boston University, the multiyear project aims to produce better indicators of democracy, helping to illuminate why democracies around the world succeed or fail.

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Notre Dame Theater Course ‘Takes it Down to Zero’

Author: Leigh Hayden

Categories: General News, Centers and Institutes, Internationalism, Arts, and Faculty News

In Performance Analysis, a Notre Dame theatre course taught by Anton Juan, senior professor of directing and playwriting in the Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT), this fall, majors from a cross-section of the FTT’s disciplines are guided to the sources of performance. It’s more than just “What’s My Motivation 101.” The goal, says Juan, is for student actors to develop critical thinking.

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Notre Dame Film Students’ Documentary Explores a New Kind of Modern Family

Author: Claire Stephens

Categories: General News, Undergraduate News, Alumni, and Faculty News

Project Hopeful, a documentary 2012 University of Notre Dame graduates Grace Johnson and Kelsie Kiley made for a course in the Department of Film, Television and Theater (FTT), is about a new kind of modern family: one where an Illinois couple with seven biological children doubles the size of its family by adopting orphans with HIV/AIDS and special needs.

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Liberal Arts Education Inspires Life of Learning for Dr. Bob Arnot

Author: Mark Shuman

Categories: General News, Alumni, and Internationalism

Dr. Bob Arnot ’70 has worked as an Olympic physician, served on the boards of Save the Children and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, worked as the chief medical correspondent for NBC and CBS News, covered most major humanitarian disasters, served as MSNBC’s chief foreign correspondent in Iraq and Afghanistan, and written a dozen best-selling books on health and nutrition. As host of the television show Dr. Danger, he navigates treacherous assignments in Somalia, Sudan, and other global hotspots. Arnot also spends four months a year on humanitarian projects in Africa and the Middle East, and just completed a PBS documentary on starving children. His passions, he says, took root in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters.

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Notre Dame Student Grants Wishes of Hospice Patients

Author: Claire Stephens

Categories: General News and Undergraduate News

When Caitlin Crommett was 15 years old, she founded DreamCatchers, a club she created to grant the last wishes of terminally ill hospice patients. Now a University of Notre Dame sophomore majoring in business entrepreneurship and film, television and theatre, Crommett recently expanded DreamCatchers, which began as a high school club and is now a national organization with chapters in California and Indiana.

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ND Design Students’ Project Receives Sappi ‘Ideas that Matter’ Grant

Collaboration among University of Notre Dame faculty and students, Sedlack Design Associates, and Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns has resulted in a $50,000 Sappi Ideas that Matter grant to together+, a campaign to combat xenophobia in South Africa.

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The Breadth and Depth of Life: Former Chief Justice Lauds Liberal Arts Perspective

Author: Mary Kate Malone

Categories: General News and Alumni

Of the many lessons Kathleen Blatz ’76 took from Notre Dame, the one she says mattered most was not learned in a specific class or from a certain professor. Rather, it was the entirety of her educational experience—from studying abroad in Rome to diving into art history to exploring anthropology—that broadened her perspective on life and helped shape her own path.

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Notre Dame Magazine Essays Honored

Author: Claire Stephens

Categories: General News and Alumni

Two essays published in Notre Dame Magazine last year have been named to the “Notable Essays of 2011” in this year’s collection of The Best American Essays, edited by David Brooks and Robert Atwan. Both essays were written by graduates of the University’s College of Arts and Letters.

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Bringing the Unknown to Light: Faculty Research Overlooked French Writing

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: General News, Research, Internationalism, and Faculty News

Two professors of French and Francophone studies in Notre Dame’s Department of Romance Languages and Literatures are bringing recognition to little-known literature of the past and present. Through individual and joint research projects, Professor Julia Douthwaite, a specialist in 18th and 19th century French literature, and Associate Professor Alison Rice, an expert in French-language texts from the 20th and 21st centuries, are working toward this common goal.

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