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Learning to Become Scholars and Teachers

Author: Lisa Walenceus

Categories: Centers and Institutes, General News, and Research

Day-to-day life for graduate students is defined by the need to make a scholarly contribution to their chosen field of study. This intense focus drives these students to spend their days—and nights—doing research and analysis, writing and presenting papers, and, ultimately, submitting their work for publication in peer-reviewed journals. But at Notre Dame, these young scholars have another aspiration as well. As part of a University that values both research and undergraduate education, the graduate students in the Department of Sociology also strive to make a real contribution in the classroom.

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John Van Engen Wins Gründler Book Prize in Medieval Studies

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

John Van Engen, Andrew V. Tackes Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, has been awarded the 2010 Otto Gründler Book Prize for Sisters and Brothers of the Common Life: The Devotio Moderna and the World of the Later Middle Ages (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008). The honor is given each year to an author whose work in any area of medieval studies is judged to be an outstanding contribution to the field.

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Brian Ó Conchubhair Honored for Book on Irish Fin de Siècle

Author: Joanna Basile

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

Brian Ó Conchubhair, associate professor in the Department of Irish Language and Literature, has won an award for his book, Fin de Siècle na Gaeilge: Darwin, an Athbheochan, agus smaointeoireacht na hEorpa (The Irish Fin de Siècle: Darwin, the Language Revival, and European Intellectual Thought), from the American Conference for Irish Studies. The award, Duais Leabhar Taighde na Bliana Fhoras na Gaeilge, is bestowed for the best book of the year written in the Irish language.

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ND Expert: Arizona Immigration Law Fuels Misconception That All Latinos Illegal

Author: Shannon Chapla

Categories: Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, and Internationalism

Allert Brown-Gort, associate director of the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies, is critical of Arizona’s immigration law that goes into effect next month. The law requires an officer to determine a person’s immigration status if he/she is stopped, detained or arrested and there is “reasonable suspicion” that person is in the U.S. illegally.

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New Italian Studies Program Receives Two Office of Research Grants

Author: Renee Hochstetler

Categories: Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

The University of Notre Dame has longstanding historical and intellectual ties with Italy. While the University is already home to an impressive number of scholars whose research and teaching focus on Italy, previously no institutional structure captured their collective expertise. Now, thanks to support from the College of Arts and Letters and two grants awarded by the Office of Research, the University will further extend its engagement with that country in the form of an interdisciplinary program in Italian studies.

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Professors Amago and Jerez-Farrán Edit Book on Franco

A new book in the Kellogg Institute’s series with the University of Notre Dame Press explores how citizens in Spain confront memories of Franco’s dictatorship. Unearthing Franco’s Legacy: Mass Graves and the Recovery of Historical Memory in Spain is the most recent addition to the Contemporary European Politics and Society Series.

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Father-Daughter Peacebuilders Publish Book

Author: Jennifer Laiber

Categories: Alumni, Centers and Institutes, Faculty News, General News, Internationalism, and Research

John Paul and Angela Jill Lederach have written When Blood and Bones Cry Out: Journeys Through the Soundscape of Healing and Reconciliation. Published by the University of Queensland Press, the book challenges the traditional idea that healing and reconciliation are linear and sequential “post-conflict” processes. Instead, the authors write, healing after war, near-death experiences, or sexual violence is circular and dynamic—and can continue even when the violence hasn’t stopped.

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