Two European Journeys of Formation: New Calls and New Charisms in France


Location: Geddes Hall, Andrews Auditorium

Brother Anthony Ariniello and Sister Nikki Borchardt, members of the Catholic Community of the Beatitudes.

Brother Anthony was born and raised in Boulder, Colorado. After his time at Notre Dame, he spent four years in diocesan seminary. During seminary, he got to know the community of the Beatitudes, one of many new communities and movements born in France in the wake of the second Vatican Council. In the Beatitudes, Anthony recognized a way to root his priesthood in the fabric of community praise, service, and fraternal relationships. In 2002, he left seminary to enter the community and spent two years in a monastic rhythm in Italy, two years of formation in Hebrew and Judaism in Israel, a pastoral year with the Beatitudes’ house in Denver, two years of theology in France, and he is presently finishing a master’s in Christian anthropology at the Faculty of Saint Teresa of Avila in Rome. Last summer, he joined 16 fellow brothers and sisters to pronounce final vows in Lourdes, and he received the name Anthony of the Transfiguration.

During a year of study at Universität Salzburg in Austria, Sr. Nikki encountered the Community of the Beatitudes at the bus stop. God used this providential moment to change her life forever! After entering the Community of the Beatitudes in Denver (2002), she was sent to France for two years of formation. She graduated from the University of Minnesota, summa cum laude, in 2002 with a degree in architecture and German studies. Sr. Nikki has since worked in music and liturgy, translations, the parish, and teaching. In the missionary spirit of the Community of the Beatitudes, she has spent time with the Beatitudes’ missions in Mexico, Israel, and most recently, a leper colony in China. Sr. Nikki is currently teaching at St. Catherine of Siena School and working on a Master’s in Biblical Theology at the Augustine Institute in Denver.

A pizza reception to follow the lecture.

Co-sponsored by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies