Conference to Explore Conceptions of Truth

February 28, 2012 • Brittany Collins

NDIAS Conceptions of Truth conference

The University of Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) will host an international conference, Conceptions of Truth, focused on the nature of truth.

The interdisciplinary conference, scheduled for April 12-14 (Thursday-Saturday), will bring 17 leading experts to McKenna Hall to address the subject of “the truth.” The conference will include discussion of ideas presented as well as less formal opportunities for scholarly interaction.

Speakers from institutes across the globe will present such topics as:

  • “What is the nature of inference?”
  • “Speculation and narration in mathematics”
  • “How is theology inspired by the sciences?”
  • “Could normative insights be sources of normative information?”
  • “A molecular glimpse at how Mother Nature can regulate our being”

Each session consists of a 35-minute presentation followed by 25 minutes for discussion. Registration is now open to faculty, staff, students and the public. The conference will be simulcast; video will be available on the NDIAS website during the event.

Presenters include Celia Deane-Drummond, a professor in Notre Dame’s Department of Theology and the University’s John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values; Robert Hanna, philosophy professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder; Carsten Dutt, assistant professor in the German department at the University of Heidelberg; Laurent Lafforgue, a mathematics professor at Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques (IHES); Sue Savage-Rumbaugh from the Great Ape Trust; and NDIAS Director Vittorio Hösle, Paul G. Kimball Chair of Arts and Letters in the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures and a concurrent professor in the departments of philosophy and political science.

Truth is one of the three major values—beauty, goodness and truth—that inspire NDIAS. The institute supports research that is directed toward, or extends inquiry to include, ultimate questions and questions of value, especially as they engage the Catholic intellectual tradition. It encourages fellows to explore the relationship between the world as it is and the world as it should be, and to reflect on the broad questions that link multiple areas of inquiry.

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Originally published at newsinfo.nd.edu.