Faculty Resources

This page is designed to give you quick, easy access to a variety of resources and information sources across the College and University. Have suggestions for additional links? Email us.

Calendars
CAP Documents
College Reference Guide
Computing, Document Support
Forms and Policies – Faculty Administration
Forms and Policies – Procurement, Requisitions, Reimbursements, Etc.
Lists of Note
Research Support, News
Space Requests
Special Programs
Teaching Resources
University Resources
Women in Arts and Letters

Calendars

Submit an event to the Arts and Letters calendar

CAP Documents (restricted access)

  • Find the latest CAP documents through the Office of the Provost.

College Reference Guide

Computing, Document Support

Forms, Policies – Faculty Administration

  • Form P (.pdf)
    Note: You must copy this two-page form onto a one-page, two-sided document before submitting.

Forms, Policies – Procurement, Requisitions, Reimbursements

Note: Additional forms can be found on the Controller’s website.

Lists of Note

Research Support, News

Space Requests

Special Programs

Teaching Resources

University Resources

Women in Arts and Letters


Key Contacts


Faculty Teaching Grants

Interested in getting funds to support cultural excursions and academic experiences that enhance teaching and student learning beyond the classroom? Check out the Teaching Beyond the Classroom Guidelines, the TBC Small Grant Application and the Teaching Beyond the Classroom Mid-Size & Major Grant Application

Want to share a meal with your students? Check out the Table Talk Form and Table Talk Reimbursement Step-by-Step Instructions. Faculty needing meal tickets to share a meal at one of Notre Dame’s dining halls can pick up the tickets from Brenda Teshka in the Office for Undergraduate Studies at 104 O’Shaughnessy.

Arts and Letters News

  • Historian Wins Phi Beta Kappa Award for Book on Philology

    Phi Beta Kappa

    For his book pulling together the complex history of philology and how Western humanistic learning split into the modern humanities that we know today, Notre Dame historian James Turner has received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award. The honor is given for books in literary scholarship or criticism and is named for a distinguished Princeton University scholar, teacher, and dean. Turner’s book, Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities, looks at how learned researchers once included languages, history, and texts in a single broad field of study that came to be known as philology. Read More >

  • Liberal Studies Professor and Medieval Institute Faculty Affiliate Wins Olivia Remie Constable Prize

    Robichaud Icon

    Denis Robichaud, an assistant professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, has been awarded the 2016 Olivia Remie Constable Prize in Medieval Studies for study at the University of Oxford this summer. The prize was established last year by Robert M. Conway to honor Remie Constable, the former director of Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute, and was held last summer by Kent Emery Jr., a professor in the Program of Liberal Studies, who completed work for an ongoing multi-person Duns Scotus edition. Robichaud studies 15th-century history and philosophy, and particularly Marsilio Ficino. Read More >

  • Video: William Collins Donahue on the Resonance of Small Moments in Holocaust Literature

    William Collins Donahue

    “Early literary encounters with the Holocaust tended to tell you about the whole event, but now when the Holocaust appears, generally speaking, it appears in small moments, in kind of passing glances,” said William Collins Donahue, the John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities and chair of the Department of German and Russian Languages and Literatures at the University of Notre Dame. Donahue has researched extensively in the areas of literary realism and modernism, especially the work of Elias Canetti. Now focusing primarily on Holocaust literature, Donahue is developing an analogy for how the Holocaust appears in contemporary narratives. These small episodes, Donahue said, are similar to the Stolpersteine, a worldwide movement of small pavement stones, each commemorating a victim in the Holocaust. Read More >

  • Video: Theology Professor Khaled Anatolios on Studying the Origins of Christian Doctrines

    Khaled Anatolios Icon

    “I tend to gravitate towards doctrines that seem inexplicable, and I try to understand what motivated the early Christians to formulate these doctrines in just these ways,” said Khaled Anatolios, professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame. Anatolios specializes in the theology of the early Church. As a Byzantine Catholic priest, he has a special interest in the doctrines of the Greek fathers as well as complementary ideas between the Eastern and Western traditions. His current research focuses on the doctrine of salvation, particularly the disconnect between classical sources and modern experience. Read More >